Tag: Urging

Mayor was on vacation in Mexico while urging residents to stay home

The mayor of Austin, Texas, on Wednesday apologized for attending a wedding and traveling to Mexico for a vacation after urging residents to stay home in an effort to slow the spread of coronavirus.



Steve Adler wearing a suit and tie


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Steve Adler

“I want you to know that I regret that travel,” Mayor Steve Adler said in a video statement. “I wouldn’t travel now. I didn’t over Thanksgiving, and I won’t over Christmas, and no one should. Everyone should be avoiding non-essential travel now because we are in the orange area.”

Adler, the two-term mayor of Austin, said he attended a small, private wedding for his daughter in November and then traveled with his family to Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. In a video filmed from his vacation, Adler urged residents to stay home, citing the rising number of coronavirus cases. “We need to stay home if you can,” he said. “Do everything you can to try to keep the numbers down. This is not the time to relax.”

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He first revealed he was on vacation in an interview with the Austin American-Statesman. 

“I recognize that the fact that I took that trip, and at the same time, was continuing to urge people to be cautious is confusing,” Adler said in his apology Wednesday. “I know that others have chosen not to travel under the same circumstances, and I know that in my position, I need to send a clearer message. I’m sorry I took that trip. It was a lapse in judgment, and I want you to know that I apologize.”

Adler said his actions set a “bad example” to the people of Austin but he did not break any established COVID-19 restrictions for the city. At the time, the city was operating under its Stage 3 health recommendations, which urges residents to avoid gatherings of more than 10 people. 

Adler told the Austin American-Statesman that 20 people attended the wedding. He said his daughter originally invited 100 people but disinvited most of the attendees. “It’s a hard thing for a girl to do, but there are girls all over the city that are having to do the same kind of thing, couples all over the city that are having to do the same kind of thing,” Adler said. 

Austin is located in Travis County, where there are currently over 2,600 active virus cases and 222 hospitalizations, according to health officials. More than 486 people have died from the virus there during the pandemic. 

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Austin mayor apologizes for urging residents to stay home while on vacation in Mexico

The mayor of Austin, Texas, on Wednesday apologized for attending a wedding and traveling to Mexico for a vacation after urging residents to stay home in an effort to slow the spread of coronavirus.

“I want you to know that I regret that travel,” Mayor Steve Adler said in a video statement. “I wouldn’t travel now. I didn’t over Thanksgiving, and I won’t over Christmas, and no one should. Everyone should be avoiding non-essential travel now because we are in the orange area.”

Adler, the two-term mayor of Austin, said he attended a small, private wedding for his daughter in November and then traveled with his family to Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. In a video filmed from his vacation, Adler urged residents to stay home, citing the rising number of coronavirus cases. “We need to stay home if you can,” he said. “Do everything you can to try to keep the numbers down. This is not the time to relax.”

He first revealed he was on vacation in an interview with the Austin American-Statesman. 

“I recognize that the fact that I took that trip, and at the same time, was continuing to urge people to be cautious is confusing,” Adler said in his apology Wednesday. “I know that others have chosen not to travel under the same circumstances, and I know that in my position, I need to send a clearer message. I’m sorry I took that trip. It was a lapse in judgment, and I want you to know that I apologize.”

Adler said his actions set a “bad example” to the people of Austin but he did not break any established COVID-19 restrictions for the city. At the time, the city was operating under its Stage 3 health recommendations, which urges residents to avoid gatherings of more than 10 people. 

Adler told the Austin American-Statesman that 20 people attended the wedding. He said his daughter originally invited 100 people but disinvited most of the attendees. “It’s a hard thing for a girl to do, but there are girls all over the city that are having to do the same kind of thing, couples all over the city that are having to do the same kind of thing,” Adler said. 

Austin is located in Travis County, where there are currently over 2,600 active virus cases and 222 hospitalizations, according to health officials. More than 486 people have died from the virus there during the pandemic. 

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Mayor of Austin, Texas, apologizes for taking Mexico vacation while urging residents to stay home

The mayor of Austin, Texas, has apologized for traveling to Mexico during the pandemic.

Responding to a story first reported Wednesday in The Austin American-Statesman, the mayor, Steve Adler, admitted he traveled in early November to Cabo San Lucas, Mexico — and while abroad, he even recorded a message urging Austinites to stay home to combat the spread of the coronavirus.

In a video posted online Wednesday, Adler said, “I need to set a clearer example so that my message is unambiguous, and for the failure to do that I sincerely apologize.”

In the message, Adler said that his daughter, “like many other brides,” had to cancel her wedding plans because of public health rules, and “instead she had a small, mostly family, very private wedding.”

“Most importantly, she was happy,” Adler said. “Afterwards, a small, mostly family group traveled to Mexico.”

“I want you to know I regret that travel. I wouldn’t travel now, I didn’t over Thanksgiving, and I wouldn’t over Christmas — and no one should, everyone should be avoiding nonessential travel now because we are in the orange area,” Adler said, referring to the fourth-highest level of the city’s color-coded chart.

Adler worried that his travel, which he said “took place during a safer period,” might “lead to some taking riskier behavior now.”

Adler called his decision to go to Mexico a “bad example” and “confusing” and said he needs “to send a clearer message.”

“I’m sorry I took that trip. It was a lapse in judgment, and I want you to know I apologize,” he said.

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Austin mayor took vacation in Mexico while urging people to stay home | Austin

Austin’s mayor, Steve Adler, went on vacation to Mexico with family in November as he urged people to stay home amid worsening coronavirus caseloads in Texas, at one point recording a video during the trip in which he told residents back home that now was “not the time to relax”.

The trip, revealed on Wednesday by the Austin American-Statesman, is the latest example of a public official who has pleaded for vigilance in the face of rising cases and hospitalizations across the US seeming not to heed their own guidance. Adler, a Democrat, told the newspaper his actions did not violate his own regulations.

Last month, the California governor, Gavin Newsom, came under scrutiny for attending a birthday party at a posh restaurant in the wine country near San Francisco as he urged people to stay within their own households. Denver’s mayor, Michael Hancock, also flew to Mississippi to visit family for Thanksgiving despite sending messages on social media and to city staff asking them to avoid traveling for the holiday. He has since apologized.

“There was no recommendation for people not to travel during that period of time,” Adler told the newspaper. “Someone could look at me and say, ‘He traveled.’ But what they could not say is that I traveled at a time when I was telling other people not to travel.”

Adler did not immediately return a message Wednesday.

Texas surpassed 9,000 hospitalized virus patients this week for the first time since a deadly summer outbreak. More than 15,000 new cases were reported on Tuesday, smashing a single-day record, though state health officials attributed some of that spike to a backlog of results from the long Thanksgiving holiday weekend.

More than 272,000 Americans have died from Covid-19, and more than 13.8 million have been infected – more than any other country by far.

The trip to Cabo San Lucas came after Adler hosted an outdoor wedding and reception with 20 guests for his daughter at a hotel near downtown Austin, according to the newspaper. Adler said the attendees had to take a rapid Covid-19 test and maintain social distancing. He acknowledged, however, that although masks were distributed at the wedding, all guests were “probably not” wearing them all the time.

Adler typically does a nightly livestream on Facebook, and while in Mexico on 9 November, he recorded a video warning about the rising number of cases. He did not say in the video that he was on vacation.

“We need to stay home if you can,” Adler said in the video. “This is not the time to relax. We are going to be looking really closely. … We may have to close things down if we are not careful.”

After Adler returned from the trip, local health officials elevated the city’s Covid-19 guidance before the Thanksgiving holiday to stage 4, which discourages nonessential travel.

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Denver mayor offers apology for Thanksgiving travel after urging residents to stay home

He recognized that many people were “disappointed” by his decision.

On Wednesday, Mayor Michael B. Hancock headed to Mississippi to join his wife and daughter there, he said.

Earlier that day, the mayor told Denver ABC affiliate KMGH that during the holiday, “if you can, remain in your household. If you can, stay with those in your household.” If you choose to travel, he said to “do what we’ve always been asking throughout the entire experience: Wear a mask, social distance and wash your hands.”

He also advised residents to avoid travel “if you can” and to host virtual gatherings this Thanksgiving in a social media post on Wednesday.

Hancock did not mention his own plans to travel. In his mea culpa, the mayor said he should have.

“I fully acknowledge that I have urged everyone to stay home and avoid unnecessary travel,” he said in a statement. “I have shared how my family cancelled our plans for our traditional multi-household Thanksgiving celebration. What I did not share, but should have, is that my wife and my daughter have been in Mississippi, where my daughter recently took a job. As the holiday approached, I decided it would be safer for me to travel to see them than to have two family members travel back to Denver.”

The news of Hancock’s travels was met with calls of hypocrisy on Twitter. The mayor said he recognized that many people were “disappointed” by his decision.

“As a public official, whose conduct is rightly scrutinized for the message it sends to others, I apologize to the residents of Denver who see my decision as conflicting with the guidance to stay at home for all but essential travel,” he said. “I made my decision as a husband and father, and for those who are angry and disappointed, I humbly ask you to forgive decisions that are borne of my heart and not my head.”

PHOTO: Denver Mayor Michael Hancock listens as Colorado Rep. Alec Garnett, D-Denver, makes a point during a news conference about the rapid increase in coronavirus cases in the state Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2020, in Denver.

Denver County has seen a surge in COVID-19 cases, with the seven-day moving average of new cases reaching a peak of 728 on Nov. 21, county data shows. The county is in the state’s “level red” risk category, indicating a 14-day average positivity rate of between 10% and 15%.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has advised people to spend the holiday at home as the number of COVID-19 cases spike.

Colorado Gov. Jared Polis has also urged residents

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Denver mayor says he ‘should have’ shared Thanksgiving travel plans after urging people to ‘avoid unnecessary travel’

Denver’s mayor apologized for traveling out of state to visit family members only hours after telling residents of the Colorado city to “avoid travel.”

Denver Mayor Michael Hancock, a Democrat, who was seen boarding a flight to Houston, Texas, on Wednesday said that although he warned residents of the Colorado capital to refrain from traveling amid the coronavirus pandemic, he decided “it would be safer” to travel to Mississippi to visit his daughter than have her come to Denver.

“I fully acknowledge that I have urged everyone to stay home and avoid unnecessary travel,” Hancock wrote. “I have shared how my family canceled our plans for our traditional multi-household Thanksgiving celebration. What I did not share, but should have, is that my wife and my daughter have been in Mississippi, where my daughter recently took a job. As the holiday approached, I decided it would be safer for me to travel to see them than to have two family members travel back to Denver.”

Hancock was chastised online for his hypocritical decision and apologized for the travel plans after critics noted his office previously instructed residents to stay home for “all but essential travel.”

Hancock admitted that he allowed his emotions to get the better of his travel plans, which fly directly against his own health guidelines.

“I made my decision as a husband and father, and for those who are angry and disappointed, I humbly ask you to forgive decisions that are borne of my heart and not my head,” Hancock added.

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Mayor offers apology for Thanksgiving travel after urging residents to stay home

The mayor of Denver apologized for traveling on Wednesday after having urged residents to stay home for Thanksgiving as COVID-19 cases surge.



Michael Hancock wearing a suit and tie: Denver Mayor Michael Hancock makes a point during a news conference about the rapid increase in coronavirus cases in the state Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2020, in Denver.


© David Zalubowski/AP, File
Denver Mayor Michael Hancock makes a point during a news conference about the rapid increase in coronavirus cases in the state Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2020, in Denver.

On Wednesday, Mayor Michael B. Hancock headed to Mississippi to join his wife and daughter there, he said.

MORE: Potential COVID-19 surge following Thanksgiving could cause ‘humanitarian crisis,’ experts warn

Earlier that day, the mayor told Denver ABC affiliate KMGH that during the holiday, “if you can, remain in your household. If you can, stay with those in your household.” If you choose to travel, he said to “do what we’ve always been asking throughout the entire experience: Wear a mask, social distance and wash your hands.”



Michael Hancock wearing a suit and tie: Denver Mayor Michael Hancock makes a point during a news conference about the rapid increase in coronavirus cases in the state Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2020, in Denver.


© David Zalubowski/AP, File
Denver Mayor Michael Hancock makes a point during a news conference about the rapid increase in coronavirus cases in the state Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2020, in Denver.

He also advised residents to avoid travel “if you can” and to host virtual gatherings this Thanksgiving in a social media post on Wednesday.

Hancock did not mention his own plans to travel. In his mea culpa, the mayor said he should have.

“I fully acknowledge that I have urged everyone to stay home and avoid unnecessary travel,” he said in a statement. “I have shared how my family cancelled our plans for our traditional multi-household Thanksgiving celebration. What I did not share, but should have, is that my wife and my daughter have been in Mississippi, where my daughter recently took a job. As the holiday approached, I decided it would be safer for me to travel to see them than to have two family members travel back to Denver.”

The news of Hancock’s travels was met with calls of hypocrisy on Twitter. The mayor said he recognized that many people were “disappointed” by his decision.

“As a public official, whose conduct is rightly scrutinized for the message it sends to others, I apologize to the residents of Denver who see my decision as conflicting with the guidance to stay at home for all but essential travel,” he said. “I made my decision as a husband and father, and for those who are angry and disappointed, I humbly ask you to forgive decisions that are borne of my heart and not my head.”



a man wearing a suit and tie: Denver Mayor Michael Hancock listens as Colorado Rep. Alec Garnett, D-Denver, makes a point during a news conference about the rapid increase in coronavirus cases in the state Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2020, in Denver.


© David Zalubowski/AP, File
Denver Mayor Michael Hancock listens as Colorado Rep. Alec Garnett, D-Denver, makes a point during a news conference about the rapid increase in coronavirus cases in the state Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2020, in Denver.

Denver County has seen a surge in COVID-19 cases, with the seven-day moving average of new cases reaching a peak of 728 on Nov. 21, county data shows. The county is in the state’s “level red” risk category, indicating a 14-day average positivity rate of between 10% and 15%.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

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Denver Mayor Flies to Texas for Thanksgiving After Urging City Residents to Avoid Travel Due to COVID



Michael Hancock wearing a suit and tie: Denver Mayor Michael Hancock participates in a panel discussion during the U.S. Chamber of Commerce's 'Infrastructure Week' program May 15, 2017 in Washington, DC. Hancock boarded a fight on Wednesday despite warning Denver residents to avoid traveling over Thanksgiving.


© Chip Somodevilla/Getty
Denver Mayor Michael Hancock participates in a panel discussion during the U.S. Chamber of Commerce’s ‘Infrastructure Week’ program May 15, 2017 in Washington, DC. Hancock boarded a fight on Wednesday despite warning Denver residents to avoid traveling over Thanksgiving.

Denver Mayor Michael Hancock boarded a flight to Houston on Wednesday after urging city residents to avoid travel due to the rising cases of COVID-19 in Colorado.

Moments before boarding the plane to Texas, Hancock tweeted “avoid travel, if you can,” “stay home as much as you can,” and “host virtual gatherings instead of in-person dinners” in a Thanksgiving post about slowing the spread of the coronavirus.

His spokeswoman confirmed to NBC affiliate KUSA on Wednesday that the mayor was traveling to visit his daughter in Mississippi, and that his wife was already there.

Hancock has said his family will be foregoing a large gathering this Thanksgiving, writing in an email to city staff that for his family, coronavirus precautions “means cancelling our traditional gathering of our extended family.”

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“As he has shared, the Mayor is not hosting his traditional large family dinner this year, but instead traveling alone to join his wife and daughter where the three of them will celebrate Thanksgiving at her residence instead of having them travel back to Denver,” the mayor’s spokesperson told KUSA.

Hancock’s assistant advised that he would be out of office from Wednesday to Friday, according to an email obtained by the network.

In an email to city staff, Hancock wrote: “As the holidays approach, we all long to be with our families with person, but with the continued rise in cases, I’m urging you to refrain from travel this Thanksgiving holiday.”

He also said anyone who travels out of state for the weekend should self-isolate for 14 days, including himself.

“Upon return, he will follow all necessary health and safety guidance and quarantine,” the mayor’s spokesperson said.

COVID-19 cases are on the rise in Denver. Last week, the city entered Colorado’s Level Red severe risk category. According to Denver Public Health, the city has reported 33,971 confirmed cases and 494 deaths as of Wednesday.

At a news conference with Colorado Governor Jared Polis, Hancock said: “We need everyone to stay home.”

During a Tuesday briefing, Polis said that one in 41 Coloradans is currently infected with COVID-19, the highest figure the state has seen since the pandemic began in March.

Hancock is the latest public official to face backlash for traveling ahead of Thanksgiving despite encouraging constituents to do the opposite.

Earlier this week, New York

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California, Oregon and Washington issue Covid travel advisory urging 14-day quarantine

  • The governors of California, Oregon and Washington issued a joint coronavirus travel advisory on Friday urging people arriving to their states to self-quarantine for 14 days.
  • The West Coast states also advised people to avoid non-essential out-of-state travel.
  • The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warns that traveling can increase someone’s chance of spreading and becoming infected with the coronavirus.



a person sitting in a car: A masked passenger is seen seated on a flight from San Francisco, California to Newark, New Jersey on October 27, 2020.


© Provided by CNBC
A masked passenger is seen seated on a flight from San Francisco, California to Newark, New Jersey on October 27, 2020.

The governors of California, Oregon and Washington issued a joint coronavirus travel advisory on Friday urging people arriving to their states to self-quarantine for 14 days and asking residents to avoid all non-essential out-of-state trips.

The Pacific Northwest states said essential travel includes people who are traveling for “work and study, critical infrastructure support, economic services and supply chains, health, immediate medical care and safety and security,” according to a statement.

The Democratic governors also recommended that travelers limit their interactions with only people in their households.

“California just surpassed a sobering threshold – one million COVID-19 cases – with no signs of the virus slowing down,” California Gov. Gavin Newsom said in a statement. “Increased cases are adding pressure on our hospital systems and threatening the lives of seniors, essential workers and vulnerable Californians. Travel increases the risk of spreading COVID-19, and we must all collectively increase our efforts at this time to keep the virus at bay and save lives.”

The travel advisory is voluntary, according to Newsom’s office, which sent out a statement saying the best enforcement is “encouraging others to be respectable and be responsible by taking action. Asking people to do the right thing is the most powerful enforcement tool we have.”

Friday’s travel warning comes as families across the country modify their holiday plans and university students plan their return trips home amid a surge of Covid-19 cases in nearly every corner of the U.S.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo told reporters on a call late last week that the state would ramp up enforcement at its airports during the holiday season to ensure arriving travelers follow quarantine and testing requirements.

Cuomo said he plans to send in more National Guard to help enforce the state’s travel advisory, adding that he spoke with New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio about increasing the New York City Police Department’s presence as well.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warns that traveling can increase someone’s chance of spreading and becoming infected with the coronavirus. The safest option is to stay home, the CDC’s guidance says.

When it comes to traveling by air, people should be aware that the risk isn’t limited to sitting on the plane alone, said Keri Althoff, an associate professor in the department of epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, during a media call Thursday.

Althoff cautioned that standing in line, especially if travelers are less than 6 feet away

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Hotel association urging lawmakers to pass coronavirus relief before next Congress sworn in

The American Hotel & Lodging Association is urging federal lawmakers to pass new coronavirus relief before the next Congress takes over because of the group’s fear that Americans will not travel for the upcoming holiday season.

AHLA said a survey it commissioned by Morning Consult found that 72% of Americans are unlikely to travel for this month’s Thanksgiving holiday and 69% of respondents said they are unlikely to travel for the Christmas holiday in December.

“Fewer people will be traveling, and business travel remains nearly non-existent. That’s why it’s so important for Congress to pass a relief bill now,” Chip Rogers, AHLA president and CEO, said in a statement. “Millions of Americans are out of work, and thousands of small businesses are struggling to keep their doors open. We cannot afford to wait until the next Congress is sworn in for relief. They need help now.”

While promising news about coronavirus vaccine candidates have emerged in recent days, the long-term outlook for the hospitality industry remains dire. The Morning Consult survey for AHLA found 44% of respondents either have no plans to stay in a hotel or their next hotel stay for vacation travel is more than a year away.

Morning Consult’s poll surveyed 2,200 adults from Nov. 2-4 online with a plus or minus margin of error of 2 percentage points. AHLA bills itself as the only national association representing all segments of the lodging industry and has existed for more than 100 years, according to its website.

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