Tag: travel

CDC warns Americans not to travel to Mexico as airlines see increased demand

Last month, Mexico was the “clear leader” for U.S.-International air travel.

In the past two weeks, Mexico surpassed 100,000 deaths due to the virus and reported over 1 million cases since the beginning of the pandemic. The agency assigned Mexico its highest advisory, saying travel there “may increase your chance of getting and spreading COVID-19.”

Data from travel itinerary app TripIt showed while air travel from the U.S. to Mexico in December is down overall, “the share of U.S.-origin flight reservations to the country have increased 179 percent year-over-year.”

PHOTO: Members of the military make sure passengers are following the COVID-19 rules at Cancun International Airport on Nov. 19, 2020 in Cancun, Mexico.

Brittany Bamrick, 31, plans to take her first international trip in January since the pandemic began. Her company bought out a “remote” yoga retreat center in Todos Santos, Mexico, that allows a maximum of 30 guests.

“I feel that I know the situation I’m getting into and assume the risk,” she said. “It’s an optional retreat, so if anyone wants to cancel, they can, it’s what you feel comfortable with.”

Bamrick and a majority of the people headed to the yoga retreat live in San Diego, California.

“It’s like going into a neighboring state for us,” she said. “It’s a shorter flight than others I’ve taken, so I almost feel better going to Mexico.”

Ashley Lewis, 36, has traveled to Mexico three times since March.

“I felt more safe there than I would at a Target or market in Los Angeles,” Lewis told ABC News. “The resorts were secluded, they weren’t selling the hotels to 100 percent capacity, and everyone was wearing masks and abiding by the rules. So much in those areas are dependent on tourism, and you could tell they were working incredibly hard to make the guests feel safe.”

Lewis says she is trying to take advantage of being able to work from anywhere – also traveling to Hawaii, Turks and Caicos, and Las Vegas during the pandemic.

“When I come home from a trip I quarantine in my home for a week or week and a half,” Lewis explained. “Then I go get that test and that’s for peace of mind that I can see my family without the fear of

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Washington region braces for increase in virus cases after Thanksgiving travel

D.C. Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D) on Monday said she expects a rise in coronavirus cases in the coming weeks, underscoring concerns about holiday travel as leaders across the Washington region lobby the federal government for additional financial relief.

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The District reported 371 new coronavirus cases on Saturday, its highest total in a single day since the start of the pandemic. The city’s daily case rate per 100,000 people, calculated on a seven-day rolling basis, reached 27 in recent days — a number not seen since May.

While it could be weeks before the region sees the effect of Thanksgiving travel, Bowser on Monday pointed to a nationwide jump in cases that is still being felt in the nation’s capital. She reminded residents to adhere to city travel guidelines, which call on those who visit a “high risk” state to limit activities for 14 days when returning to the city. Residents and visitors can also get tested within three to five days of arriving and self-monitor for symptoms until receiving a negative test result.

[D.C. eases travel restrictions ahead of Thanksgiving while urging caution during holidays]

“We expect that we’re going to have more cases,” Bowser said. “We’re also in a good position to do a lot of testing. We have a very robust testing program, which we feel strongly will help us identify and isolate people who have been infected by covid.”

The seven-day average of new daily infections across the greater Washington region on Monday was 4,662, down slightly from a high of 4,989 recorded on Thanksgiving Day.

The region on Monday recorded 3,920 new cases and 20 deaths. Maryland added 1,923 cases and 16 deaths; Virginia had 1,893 ­cases and four deaths; and D.C. recorded 104 cases and no additional deaths.

Neil J. Sehgal, an assistant professor of health policy and management at the University of Maryland, said it could be weeks before spikes in cases are seen that stem from Thanksgiving travel. Health experts had long cautioned residents to avoid traveling over the traditionally busy period — and also to avoid in-home gatherings.

“With the public attitude we saw towards travel over Thanksgiving, it’s very hard to think we won’t see an impact,” Sehgal said. “Cases will undoubtedly increase in the D.C. region.”

Maryland health officials said Monday that a child died Sunday of the coronavirus, becoming the pandemic’s youngest victim in the state. Officials didn’t release the child’s age, saying only that the victim was 9 or younger. No other information was available about the child or the nature of the death.

As caseloads continue to jump, Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (R) on Monday wrote to President-elect Joe Biden’s transition team, saying the state’s top priority is another round of stimulus funding to help battle the virus.

[Coronavirus cases and metrics in D.C., Maryland and Virginia]

Hogan, who has advocated for more federal funding since spring, told the transition team that small businesses, as well as state and local governments, need money soon.

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Despite a Second Wave Of COVID-19, 1 In 3 Americans Plan Holiday Travel

Despite a second wave of COVID-19 cases and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention urging Americans not to travel during the Thanksgiving holiday, the Sunday after Turkey Day was the busiest airports have been since mid-March when the pandemic began altering everyday life in the United States. 

According to a recent survey, and despite tightening COVID-19 restrictions in cities across the country, a larger percentage of people say they plan to travel for December holidays in the coming weeks. In fact, one in three Americans surveyed by The Vacationer said they plan to travel for Christmas, Hanukkah or Kwanzaa.

The checkpoint data from the Transportation Security Administration tells us that 1.18 million travelers went through airport security screening on Nov. 29. That’s down from 2.88 million on the same day in 2019, but much higher than in the spring when, on some days, fewer than 100,000 people were screened. Road trip travel is harder to track. But an analysis from Arrivalist shows road trip travel over the Thanksgiving holiday was down 35 percent from last year.

Of the 553 Americans queried for a recent survey published by The Vacationer, 33.46 said they planned to travel for Christmas compared to the 20.3 percent of those who said they had Thanksgiving travel plans. 

The Vacationer’s survey was done by Eric Jones, the co-founder and head of operations at the site who uses his background in mathematics as a professor at Rowan College South Jersey to conduct statistical studies and surveys on traveling and vacation.

Coast to coast, from San Francisco International Airport to John F. Kennedy and LaGuardia airports in New York, a growing number of airports are offering COVID-19 rapid tests. XpresSpa, which once opened manis, pedis and massages in airport terminals for on-the-go travelers, has pivoted to being a wellness center with rapid COVID-19 testing. The XpresCheck centers also offer flu shots. 

Airlines, including JetBlue, Hawiian Airlines, United and American Airlines, have also announced that they will begin offering pre-flight coronavirus tests. Negative tests could be a pass for travelers to skip quarantine at their destinations.

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How bad is the coronavirus pandemic about to get? Thanksgiving travel numbers look grim

Coronavirus infections are already reaching unprecedented levels throughout the U.S. Now with Thanksgiving in the rearview mirror and Christmas and New Year’s just around the curve, the question is: Just how much worse is the pandemic going to get?

The latest travel data out Monday suggest that things are looking grim. Between 800,000 and 1.1 million people flew in the days leading up to and after the holiday, according to data released by the Transportation Safety Administration. Though those numbers are a fraction of typical Thanksgiving travel patterns, they are far higher than public health officials and epidemiologists hoped to see.

Deborah Birx, the White House coronavirus response coordinator, said that Americans who traveled this past week should “assume that you were exposed and you became infected.” She urged those that traveled to get tested within the next week.

The number of new COVID-19 cases in the U.S. topped 200,000 for the first time Friday. There have been more than 265,000 deaths. Last Wednesday, as millions had already begun their holiday travel, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention forecast as many as 21,400 new deaths due to the virus over the next four weeks.

Ashish Jha, dean of Brown University’s School of Public Health, said he suspects those numbers are not high enough.

“Every time I look at the data, it’s worse,” he said.

Jha says he expects the number of new deaths to be more in the range of 25,000 to 30,000 in the Thanksgiving aftermath.

“Things are going to be so bad over the next month,” Jha said.

Exactly how bad it will get is difficult to say. Americans not only flew, but also drove to Thanksgiving celebrations. Before the holiday, the American Automobile Association predicted significant declines in bus, train and cruise travel, but only a slight drop in car travel. AAA said it would not have travel figures for the holiday anytime soon.

Car travel was projected to fall 4.3% from last year’s pre-pandemic level, to 47.8 million travelers. With less travel this year by public transportation, AAA estimates driving will account for 95% of all holiday travel. On Monday, AAA said travel may have been less than initially forecast because of climbing infection rates and public health warnings. U.S. gasoline demand decreased 7.3% in seven days ending Nov. 28, according to GasBuddy, the travel and navigation app.

Even with a surge in online sales, some Americans still hit the road to shop. Chains with lines out the door included Lululemon Athletica Inc., Bath & Body Works and Urban Outfitters. Shoppers camped overnight in some locations of GameStop Corp., one of the few retailers to do brick-and-mortar releases of new video game consoles.

“This does have the potential to turn into another superspreader event,” Doug Stephens, founder of consulting firm Retail Prophet, said of the shopping weekend.

The Trump administration had been sending out widely varying guidance on holiday travel in the weeks leading up to Thanksgiving, and only in the final week did the

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Have Rings, Will Travel | FOX Sports

By Melissa Rohlin
FOX Sports NBA reporter

Danny Green always thought this could happen. 

So when Lakers general manager Rob Pelinka let him know they were going to trade him and the No. 28 pick to the Oklahoma City Thunder in exchange for Dennis Schroder earlier this month, Green wasn’t taken aback. 

“I wasn’t shocked,” Green told FOX Sports. “I was just seeing where I was going. I was like, OK. Obviously, everybody is getting better. And I knew even when I signed (in LA), the contract that I signed for was going to be hard to maintain, was going to be hard to stabilize, especially with the pieces.”

The Lakers signed Green to a two-year, $30 million deal last July, wanting to add a veteran sharp-shooter with championship experience and defensive grit to a roster built around superstars LeBron James and Anthony Davis.  

Green, who the Thunder went on to deal to the Philadelphia 76ers, acknowledged he was hoping to return to the Lakers after helping them win their first NBA championship in a decade at Walt Disney World in Florida in October. 

Danny Green joins Colin Cowherd in the video above to discuss winning his third NBA championship with his third different team.

“Of course, any time you get a chance to win with a team, you want to try to run it back with that team,” said Green, who also won championships in 2019 with the Toronto Raptors and 2014 with San Antonio Spurs. “You make a home with the organization, the team, the players, the roster and within the city. Obviously, it’s up and down with the city and the fans and things like that.

“But I built a home and I loved the area where I was living. Nobody likes to move. I think anybody would want to go back, especially with winning and a great city like that. But at the same time, I’m not mad about it. … I know exactly what I signed up for before I got here.”

For Pelinka, it was a move that was a long time in the making. He had tried to pursue the 27-year-old Schroder before, knowing he’d give the Lakers another elite playmaker to ease the load on the team’s stars.

“We never want to just settle and I think this was an opportunity to get better,” Pelinka said Nov. 19. “It’s hard to lose a player like Danny. He was an ultimate professional and really filled a great role for us and played well. But overall, we just feel like this addition of a younger player to our core and for the future was something that we couldn’t pass on.”

The 33-year-old Green gets it.

He was appreciative of the time he spent with the Lakers and the investment they made in him. 

“There’s no love lost at all,” Green said. “You know, they gave me a contract that I never dreamed that I would ever get, and playing in a city I never

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‘Assume that you were exposed’: Officials warn of the fallout from Thanksgiving travel.

While many in the United States celebrated a muted Thanksgiving over Zoom, millions of people traveled instead, rejecting the advice of public officials.

According to Transportation Safety Administration data, about 800,000 to one million people passed through T.S.A. checkpoints each day in the days before and after the holiday — far lower than the same period last year, but likely far higher than epidemiologists had hoped to see.

A United Airlines spokeswoman, Annabelle Cottee, said the week of Thanksgiving was “the busiest since March” for the carrier.

Americans also took to the roads. AAA predicted significant declines in bus, train and cruise travel, but predicted only a modest drop in car travel.

For several days leading up to Thanksgiving, as case numbers and hospitalizations across the country grew exponentially, political leaders and medical experts warned of the dangers of compounding the virus spread by being with others. In November alone, there have been more than 4.1 million cases and more than 25,500 deaths.

There were 91,635 current hospitalizations as of Nov. 28, according to the Covid Tracking Project, almost twice as many as there were on Nov. 1, and triple the number on Oct. 1.

Aware of the emotional resonance of the holiday, experts tried to thread a narrative from these numbers that would convince people of the danger. Their warnings were direct — sometimes stern, sometimes impassioned pleas.

“Keep the gatherings, the indoor gatherings as small as you possibly can,” Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease expert, said on “Good Morning America” last week. By making that sacrifice, he said, “you’re going to prevent people from getting infected.”

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention was also urging people not to travel. “All Americans want to do what they can to protect their loved ones,” Dr. Henry Walke, a Covid-19 incident manager at the C.D.C., said at a news briefing.

And though it would have been unrealistic to expect a public that is restive from months of restrictions to universally abide by such recommendations, the aftermath of those decisions will begin to unfold in the weeks ahead.

Dr. Fauci, during an appearance on the Sunday news program “This Week,” said the best course for Thanksgiving travelers might be “to quarantine yourself for a period of time.”

Dr. Deborah L. Birx, the White House coronavirus response coordinator, said that travelers “have to assume that you were exposed and you became infected and you really need to get tested in the next week.” She urged that travelers avoid anyone in their family over 65 or with underlying illnesses.

That guidance comes as the C.D.C. is considering shortening the recommended isolation period for infected people. And while it is too early to know if holiday travel will affect the virus’s spread, new research suggests that people are most infectious about two days before symptoms begin and for five days afterward, meaning this week will likely be crucial in containment.

On Monday, Mayor Bill de Blasio of New York City

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Sunday saw the most travelers pass through US airports since the pandemic began as Americans bucked CDC warnings against Thanksgiving travel



a group of people in a room: Travelers at New York's LaGuardia Airport. AP Photo/John Minchillo


© Provided by Business Insider
Travelers at New York’s LaGuardia Airport. AP Photo/John Minchillo

  • Over 1.1 million travelers flew on Sunday, breaking a record for pandemic travel for daily passengers not seen since March.
  • Thanksgiving was largely successful in getting more flyers in the air as over 15 million passengers flew between November 19 and November 29, according to the Transportation Security Administration.
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned against Thanksgiving travel but over a third of Americans told Insider that the guidance didn’t change their plans. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The Transportation Security Administration is reporting that a record-breaking 1,176,091 passengers traveled by air on Sunday, likely returning home after the Thanksgiving holiday. It’s the first time since March 16 that daily traffic numbers have been that high.

Thanksgiving encouraged more people to fly following a lackluster summer for airlines, TSA statistics show. The days leading up to the family-oriented holiday that typically draws scores of flyers to the skies similarly saw passenger numbers exceed one million.

From November 19 to November 29, nine days saw over 900,000 passengers, four of which saw over one million passengers for a total of 10,381,904 passengers. The same period in 2019 saw 25,898,477 passengers.

It took airlines seven months to get back to one million passengers in a single day with October 18 seeing 1,031,505 flyers pass through security checkpoints at US airports. The day quickly proved to be an outlier, however, as it took another month and a popular travel holiday for the daily passenger count to rise back to similar levels.

The influx of passengers comes as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned against non-essential travel. Large gatherings allow for the virus to spread from person to person, especially when attendees are in close proximity, such as around the dinner table. 

Video: Qantas airline plans to require coronavirus vaccine for international travel, CEO says (FOX News)

Qantas airline plans to require coronavirus vaccine for international travel, CEO says

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An Insider poll of 1,110 Americans found that over one-third didn’t plan on changing their holiday plans, despite CDC warnings, and the increase in traveler numbers around the holiday clearly reflects that. 

The Thanksgiving holiday itself didn’t see as many travelers with only 560,902 flyers. That’s to be expected, however, as most holiday-goers typically fly on the days leading up to and following the holiday itself.

The next busy holiday travel rush will surround the Christmas and New Year’s holidays. This time, however, planes will be more crowded as Southwest Airlines and JetBlue Airways are filling their aircraft at higher levels than during the Thanksgiving travel period.

Southwest Airlines will allow its planes to be filled to capacity on December 1. The low-cost carrier had blocked seats over the summer, as Business Insider found on two June flights on the airline, but announced an end to the policy in October citing new Harvard University and US Department of Defense studies

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After Thanksgiving travel, Washington region braces for coronavirus rise

While it could be weeks before the region sees the effect of Thanksgiving travel, Bowser on Monday pointed to a nationwide jump in cases that is still being felt in the nation’s capital. She reminded residents to adhere to city travel guidelines, which call on those who visit a “high-risk” state to limit activities for 14 days when returning to the city. Residents and visitors can also get tested within three to five days of arriving and self-monitor for symptoms until receiving a negative test result.

“We expect that we’re going to have more cases,” Bowser said. “We’re also in a good position to do a lot of testing. We have a very robust testing program which we feel strongly will help us identify and isolate people who have been infected by covid.”

The seven-day average of new daily infections across the greater Washington region on Monday was 4,662, down slightly from a high of 4,989 recorded on Thanksgiving Day.

The region recorded 3,920 new coronavirus cases and 20 deaths on Monday. Maryland added 1,923 cases and 16 deaths, Virginia had 1,893 cases and four deaths, and D.C. recorded 104 cases and no additional deaths.

Neil J. Sehgal, an assistant professor of health policy and management at the University of Maryland, said it could be weeks before spikes in cases are seen that stem from Thanksgiving holiday travel. Health experts had long cautioned residents to avoid traveling over the traditionally busy period — and also to avoid hosting gatherings at home.

“With the public attitude we saw towards travel over Thanksgiving, it’s very hard to think we won’t see an impact,” Sehgal said. “Cases will undoubtedly increase in the D.C. region.”

Maryland health officials said Monday a child died Sunday of the coronavirus, becoming the pandemic’s youngest victim in the state. Officials didn’t release the child’s age, saying only that the victim was 9 or younger. No other information was available about the child or the nature of the death.

As caseloads continue to jump, Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (R) wrote Monday to President-elect Joe Biden’s transition team, saying the state’s top priority is another wave of stimulus funding to help with the coronavirus fight.

Hogan, who has advocated for more federal funding since the spring, told the transition team that small businesses, as well as state and local governments, need money soon. Many state and local governments, which are unable to carry a budget deficit, face significant shortfalls as tax revenue declines and price tags rise for the public health response to the pandemic.

“States are already fighting an uphill battle to rebuild our economies and maintain services in education, health care, emergency operations and public safety,” Hogan wrote. “Without federal assistance, we could be forced to consider furloughs and job cuts, halts to construction, reductions in government services, and other measures that will cause an increase in unemployment and further delay the economic recovery.”

Hogan’s request comes as officials across the region make similar pleas for additional federal

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Thanksgiving Travel Data Point to Surge in Covid Infections and Deaths

(Bloomberg) — Coronavirus infections are already reaching unprecedented levels throughout the U.S. Now with Thanksgiving in the rearview mirror and Christmas and New Year’s just around the curve, the question is: Just how much worse is the pandemic going to get?

The latest travel data out Monday suggest that things are looking grim. Between 800,000 and 1.1 million people flew in the days leading up to and after the holiday, according to data released by the Transportation Safety Administration. Though those numbers are a fraction of typical Thanksgiving travel patterns, they are far higher than public health officials and epidemiologists hoped to see.



a group of people standing in front of a building: Airline Travelers Ahead Of The Thanksgiving Holiday


© Bloomberg
Airline Travelers Ahead Of The Thanksgiving Holiday

Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told ABC’s “This Week” on Sunday that the U.S. may be about to see “a surge upon a surge.” On CBS’ “Face the Nation,” Deborah Birx, the White House coronavirus response coordinator, said that Americans who traveled this past week should “assume that you were exposed and you became infected.” She urged those that traveled to get tested within the next week.

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The number of new COVID-19 cases in the U.S. topped 200,000 for the first time Friday. There have been more than 265,000 deaths. Last Wednesday, as millions had already begun their holiday travel, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention forecast as many as 21,400 new deaths due to the virus over the next four weeks.

Ashish Jha, dean of Brown University’s School of Public Health, said he suspects those numbers are not high enough.

“Everytime I look at the data, it’s worse,” he said.

Jha says he expects the number of new deaths to be more in the range of 25,000 to 30,000 in the Thanksgiving aftermath.

“Things are going to be so bad over the next month,” Jha said.

Exactly how bad it will get is difficult to say. Americans not only flew, but also drove to Thanksgiving celebrations. Before the holiday, the American Automobile Association predicted significant declines in bus, train and cruise travel, but only a slight drop in car travel. AAA said it would not have travel figures for the holiday anytime soon.

Car travel was projected to fall 4.3% from last year’s pre-pandemic level, to 47.8 million travelers. With less travel this year by public transportation, AAA estimates driving will account for 95% of all holiday travel. On Monday, AAA said travel may have been less than initially forecast because of climbing infection rates and public health warnings. U.S. gasoline demand decreased 7.3% in seven days ending Nov. 28, according to GasBuddy, the travel and navigation app.



a busy street filled with lots of traffic: Traffic Ahead Of The Thanksgiving Holiday


© Bloomberg
Traffic Ahead Of The Thanksgiving Holiday

Even with a surge in online sales, some Americans still hit the road to shop. Chains with lines out the door included Lululemon Athletica Inc., Bath & Body Works and Urban Outfitters. Shoppers camped overnight in some locations of GameStop Corp., one of the few retailers to do brick-and-mortar releases of

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49ers to travel 700 miles for home games as Covid-19 continues to hit NFL | San Francisco 49ers

The San Francisco 49ers will play two home games in Arizona after new coronavirus regulations put in place by officials in northern California forced the team to find a temporary new home.

The news came as Covid-19 continues to ravage the NFL. The Denver Broncos were forced to play a back-up wide receiver at quarterback on Sunday after their regular signal-callers were affected by the virus, while the New Orleans Saints were fined heavily for failing to follow mask protocols. All NFL team facilities are closed on Monday and Tuesday because of the rise in Covid-19 cases across the United States, in addition to the “understanding that a number of players and staff celebrated the Thanksgiving holiday with out-of-town guests,” according to a league statement released on Friday.

An outbreak in the Baltimore Ravens camp has led to their crucial game against their fierce rivals the Pittsburgh Steelers being delayed until Tuesday. There were 70 positive tests among NFL players and staff in the week ending 21 November, compared to seven in the first week of the season, at the start of September.

The US as a whole is expecting a further rise in Covid-19 cases in the next few weeks after people travelled to visit family and friends for the Thanksgiving holiday. The virus has killed more than 265,000 people in America, the highest total for any country.

As for the 49ers, they will host the Buffalo Bills next Monday and Washington on 13 December at State Farm Stadium, home of the Arizona Cardinals, 700 miles from their base in Santa Clara county. The team said it will have information on practice arrangements later.

The AFC East-leading Bills will be returning to Arizona for the second time in a little over three weeks, following a 32-30 loss to the Cardinals on 15 November.

“The Cardinals organization, State Farm Stadium and League officials have been supportive and accommodating as we work through the many logistical issues involved in relocating NFL games,” the 49ers said in a statement.

Santa Clara county announced new rules on Saturday that include a three-week ban on practices and games for contact sports. The Niners were on a plane getting ready to travel to Los Angeles, where they beat the Rams 23-20 on Sunday, when the players and coaches heard about the rules.

The rules will also affect the San Jose Sharks of the NHL and college teams at Stanford and San Jose State. Along with the ban on contact sports, the new rules require anyone who has traveled more than 150 miles from the county to quarantine for 14 days.

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