Tag: Thousands

50 million people ignore advice, travel for holiday while thousands die from COVID-19



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More than 263,000 people in America have died from COVID-19. The CDC says that number could reach 321,000 the week before Christmas. Adriana Diaz reports.

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Marriott Copley terminates half its staff; thousands of hotel workers unemployed around Boston

The hotel industry has taken a beating during the pandemic, nowhere more so than in Boston. Through September, Boston-area hotels had the largest declines in occupancy, average daily rate, and revenue per available room — the three major metrics of hotel performance — of any major metropolitan area in the country this year, according to the hospitality data company STR.

Many hotels have reopened, but business is bleak. Occupancy rates are hovering around 25percent in the Boston area, on average, and an estimated 8,000 hotel workers are still unemployed. The city’s largest property, the Sheraton Boston Hotel, near the Hynes Convention Center, is still closed, as is the former Taj Boston (set to reopen as the Newbury Boston) and the Ritz-Carltonon Avery Street. The hotel at the Encore Boston Harbor casino reopened in July but closed in November following new restrictions on operating hours.

Given the drop-off in demand, it’s not surprising hotels aren’t bringing back many employees. Unite Here Local 26, which represents hospitality workers, estimates that only 1,000 of its 6,600 hotel members are back at work. But not offering Marriott Copley workers — who aren’t part of the union — a chance to get their jobs back is “completely unacceptable,” said Local 26 president Carlos Aramayo.

More than 230 workers — some of whom have been at the hotel for more than three decades — and about 30 managers were terminated by the Marriott Copley, according to Local 26 estimates, and a group of employees recently sent the company a letter demanding that they be first in line for their jobs once demand returns and that they receive one week of severance pay for every year of service, in line with past practices. (Current offers were capped at 10weeks, instead of the previous 26.)

“They feel that they’ve been thrown out on the street, effectively, in the middle of this crisis,” Aramayo said.

The Marriott Copley Place’s general manager, Alan Smith, said the hotel is available to address employees’ questions and provide support. “Our hotel has experienced unprecedented business impact due to the pandemic,” he wrote in an e-mail. “Throughout this timeframe, we have maintained open communications with our valued employees. Many are now reviewing severance offers, which are competitive within the industry.”

Tchoumi, the concierge attendant, was offered eight weeks of severance for her 17 years of service. She is the only source of income for her family, she said, and her unemployment is about to run out; the rental income from her family’s house in Lynn has also disappeared because their tenants can’t pay. Continuing to send money to her family in Cameroon, where a civil war is raging, is out of the question.

“I am left with nothing — no job and barely enough money to survive,” said Tchoumi, whose son also lost his job setting up meetings at the hotel; her husband retired in January after 18 years of working banquets there. “They told us we were all a family. That is not

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Indiana man posed as US marshal to con thousands from Tennessee hotel

Sometimes getting a quick deal can be costly in the long run.

An Indiana man pleaded guilty to impersonating a law enforcement officer after prosecutors said he had repeatedly claimed to be a U.S. Marshal in order to get a hotel discount, the Knoxville News Sentinel reported.

Anthony Taylor tricked a Pigeon Forge, Tennessee, hotel into giving him discounts totaling thousands of dollars during at least 10 trips over five years, according to the report, which cited court records.

An Indiana man pleaded guilty to impersonating a law enforcement officer after prosecutors said he had repeatedly claimed to be a U.S. Marshal in order to get a hotel discount. (Google Maps)

An Indiana man pleaded guilty to impersonating a law enforcement officer after prosecutors said he had repeatedly claimed to be a U.S. Marshal in order to get a hotel discount. (Google Maps)

WOMAN DEMANDS FREE CHICK-FIL-A AFTER CLAIMING SHE IS AN FBI AGENT, GETS ARRESTED

Taylor would pay the hotel in cash and flash a badge to get a discount. On more than one occasion he even told the clerk “to wash her hands after handling the money as it was confiscated drug money he had received as bonuses for ‘busts,’” prosecutors wrote in court records, per the News Sentinel.

However, staff at the hotel eventually got suspicious. When Taylor made a reservation to stay at the hotel again in April of 2019, a manager checked with the U.S. Marshals Service to verify Taylor’s employment, according to the report.

The man tricked a hotel into giving him discounts totaling thousands of dollars during at least 10 trips over five years. (SpringHill Suites)

The man tricked a hotel into giving him discounts totaling thousands of dollars during at least 10 trips over five years. (SpringHill Suites)

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When Taylor and his wife arrived for their visit, two Marshals in plainclothes were waiting for him in the lobby and pulled him aside, according to the report. They asked Taylor if he’d been telling hotel workers that he was a deputy U.S. Marshal, and he admitted he “was doing it to get the government discount.”

Taylor agreed to a plea deal in September, according to the report. Sentencing hasn’t been scheduled yet.

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He’s not the only one to get in trouble lately for allegedly impersonating a federal law enforcement officer.

Police in Dallas, Georgia, arrested a woman earlier this month after she claimed to be an FBI agent in an attempt to get free food from a Chick-fil-A, The Polk County Standard Journal reported.

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Boeing to cut thousands of additional jobs through 2021 as it prepares for long air travel slump

  • Boeing’s CEO Dave Calhoun told employees the company aims to have a staff of 130,000 by the end of 2021.
  • Earlier this year, Boeing targeted a 10% cut to its staff, which stood at 160,000 people at the start of the year.
  • The announcement came after the company reported third-quarter results, which were ahead of estimates but show Boeing’s struggles in the pandemic.



a group of fighter jets fly through the air: Grounded Boeing 737 MAX aircraft are seen parked in an aerial photo at Boeing Field in Seattle, Washington, July 1, 2019.


© Provided by CNBC
Grounded Boeing 737 MAX aircraft are seen parked in an aerial photo at Boeing Field in Seattle, Washington, July 1, 2019.

Boeing, which is already shedding 16,000 jobs, said Wednesday it will cut thousands more through the end of next year as it prepares for a long slump in air travel and aircraft demand because of the coronavirus pandemic.

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Boeing’s CEO Dave Calhoun told employees the company aims to have a staff of 130,000 by the end of 2021. Earlier this year, Boeing targeted a 10% cut to its staff, which stood at 160,000 people at the start of the year.

About 19,000 employees are leaving Boeing this year, but the company is adding some jobs in its more stable defense unit.

“As we align to market realities, our business units and functions are carefully making staffing decisions to prioritize natural attrition and stability in order to limit the impact on our people and our company,” Calhoun said in a staff note. “We anticipate a workforce of about 130,000 employees by the end of 2021. Throughout this process, we will communicate with you every step of the way.”

The announcement came after the company reported third-quarter results, which were ahead of estimates but show Boeing’s struggles in the pandemic.

Here are the numbers: 

  • Loss: $1.39 per share, vs. $2.52 a share expected by Refinitive’s consensus estimates
  • Revenue:  $14.1 billion, vs. $13.9 billion expected

Boeing shares were up fractionally in premarket trading.

Boeing reported negative free cash flow of $5.08 billion, better than analysts’ estimates and than the previous quarter’s negative $5.6 billion, according to FactSet.

The pandemic’s impact on air travel demand, which is still not back to half of last year’s levels, has worsened Boeing’s crisis, which started two years ago with the first of two crashes of its best-selling 737 Max.

Regulators are at the tail-end of the planes’ review but have still not signed off on them, preventing Boeing from delivering them to customers and crimping its cash flow as a result.

Boeing executives will detail their results on a 10:30 a.m. ET call.

Boeing to reduce workforce to fewer than 130,000 by the end of 2021

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Boeing to cut thousands of additional jobs through 2021 as it adjusts to long-term drop in air travel demand

Boeing on Wednesday said it would cut thousands of additional jobs through the end of next year as it scrambles to cut costs in the pandemic.



a group of fighter jets fly through the air: Grounded Boeing 737 MAX aircraft are seen parked in an aerial photo at Boeing Field in Seattle, Washington, July 1, 2019.


© Provided by CNBC
Grounded Boeing 737 MAX aircraft are seen parked in an aerial photo at Boeing Field in Seattle, Washington, July 1, 2019.

The company’s revenue came in ahead of estimates but the company is still struggling as virus and a plunge in air travel hurts demand for new aircraft.

Boeing’s CEO Dave Calhoun told employees that the company aims to have a staff of 130,000 by the end of 2021. Earlier this year, Boeing targeted a 10% cut to its staff, which stood at 160,000 people at the start of the year.

The company reported third-quarter results ahead of the market open.

Video: American and Southwest airlines should improve as business travel returns: Analyst (CNBC)

American and Southwest airlines should improve as business travel returns: Analyst

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Here are the numbers: 

  • Loss: $1.39 per share, vs. $2.52 a share expected by Refinitive’s consensus estimates
  • Revenue:  $14.1 billion, vs. $13.9 billion expected

Boeing was also expected to report negative free cash flow of $5.4 billion, slightly less than the previous quarter’s negative $5.6 billion, according to FactSet.

The pandemic’s impact on air travel demand, which is still not back to half of last year’s levels, has worsened Boeing’s crisis stemming from two fatal crashes of the 737 Max. Regulators are at the tail-end of the planes’ review but have still not signed off on them, preventing Boeing from delivering them to customers and crimping its cash flow as a result.

Boeing executives will detail their results on a 10:30 a.m. ET call.

This story is developing. Please check back for updates.

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Tens of thousands arrive in Hawaii with pre-travel testing

Hawaii Lt. Gov Josh Green speaks at a press conference at the Daniel K. Inouye International Airport Thursday, Oct. 15, 2020, in Honolulu. A new pre-travel testing program will allow visitors who test negative for COVID-19 to come to Hawaii and avoid two weeks of mandatory quarantine goes into effect Thursday. The pandemic has caused a devastating downturn on Hawaii's tourism-based economy. Coronavirus weary residents and struggling business owners in Hawaii will be watching closely as tourists begin to return to the islands.
Hawaii Lt. Gov Josh Green speaks at a press conference at the Daniel K. Inouye International Airport Thursday, Oct. 15, 2020, in Honolulu. A new pre-travel testing program will allow visitors who test negative for COVID-19 to come to Hawaii and avoid two weeks of mandatory quarantine goes into effect Thursday. The pandemic has caused a devastating downturn on Hawaii’s tourism-based economy. Coronavirus weary residents and struggling business owners in Hawaii will be watching closely as tourists begin to return to the islands.Marco Garcia/AP

HONOLULU (AP) — Hawaii had about 60,000 travelers arrive in the islands in the first week of its pre-travel coronavirus testing program, a state effort to get the tourism-based economy moving again amid the pandemic.

Lt. Gov. Josh Green, a Democrat, said at a news conference Thursday that 58,611 people had been screened since the Oct. 15 launch. Of those visitors — including returning residents, military members, essential workers, tourists and others — 49,791 tested negative for the coronavirus and were allowed to skip the previously required two weeks of quarantine.

People who can produce a negative test result within 72 hours of their flight to Hawaii are eligible. Test results from one of the state’s “trusted partners” — a group of clinics, pharmacies and airlines — must be uploaded to a government website upon arrival.

Some people came to Hawaii with the wrong kind of test. The state accepts only negative nucleic acid amplification tests. Other travelers chose to come to Hawaii without being tested at all.


Nearly 7,300 people on the first week’s flights were ordered to quarantine.

On Oahu, the state’s most populated island and home of Waikiki Beach, police issued about 8,400 warning and 885 citations for people not wearing masks or other coronavirus-related violations since Oct. 15, the first day of the testing program.

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Associated Press writer Jennifer Sinco Kelleher contributed to this report.

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In recreation of chipko movement, thousands gather to oppose felling of over 10,000 trees in Uttarak- The New Indian Express

By Express News Service

DEHRADUN: In recreation of famous ‘Chipko Movement’ dating back to 1973, thousands gathered in Thano of Dehradun on Sunday opposing felling of over 10,000 trees for expansion of Dehradun airport. 

A 12-year-old ‘Global Climate Activist’ Ridhima Pandey termed as Greta Thunberg of India, who was also there to support ‘Save Thano Forest’ movement said, “We are hell-bent on destroying our ecosystem mercilessly. This is a threat to whole mankind. These forests are source of life. We will be protesting against the felling of trees until the decision is reversed.”

Thousands of locals of Thano, Dehradun, Rishikesh, Bhaniyawala gathered and tied ‘Raksha Sutras’ to the trees pledging to protect those trees.

Slogans were raised and Raksha Sutras were tied around trees which represent that ‘we the people’ are the protectors of the forest.

A man hugs a tree after tying the Raksha Sutra.

Ayush Joshi, an environmental engineer and one of the protestors said, “At this age, where we as a country pledge to plant more trees, we are cutting more than ever. Thano forest works as the carbon and pollution sink of Dehradun, keeping it free of pollution issues. We must find a way to develop plans to allow our future generations to a be able to feel and benefit from the natural resources.”

Activists, environmentalists are apprehensive that the move to cut the trees in the Thano range of the Dehradun forest division could affect wildlife movement in the elephant corridors and change course of a river in the vicinity of the forest. 

Aanchal Sharma (28), a resident of Dehradun has started campaign on change.org urging the government to roll back its decision. It has got more than 20,000 signatures within three days. 

“As I have said earlier too that this planet belongs to all species and not only to humans. We should be more considerate if we want our next generations to live and thrive in sync with nature,” said Sharma. 

Many experts pointing out the problems stated that Uttarakhand is already ‘bleeding’ from the ‘devastation’ due to parachuted development ideas.

“Projects like this will destroy our sources of existence and our sources of life. Every single time, the entire model of development adopted by the current government for the sensitive Himalayan region of Uttarakhand is dangerous.

“It should have been taken up with immense care. The government wants to copy paste the development models of the plains and don’t want to invest time and energy even to understand what sustainability means.

“This is a clear evidence that the state has no intentions to conserve and are wearing blind fold to even analyse the needs of the future,” said Vishal Singh, one of the protestors and and expert on environmental issues who has been working on projects for more than a decade now. 

The Uttarakhand government has sought the National Wildlife Board (NWB)’s approval to transfer 243 acres of forest land to the Airports Authority of India (AAI) for expanding the airport. 

The current

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Thousands arrive in Hawaii on first day of pre-travel testing

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Tourists heading to Hawaii can now avoid the island’s 14-day quarantine if they take a state-approved COVID-19 test before arrival. The first passengers under the new rules left San Francisco International Airport on Thursday morning. (Oct. 15)

AP Domestic

About 8,000 people landed in Hawaii on the first day of a pre-travel testing program that allowed travelers to come to the islands without quarantining for two weeks if they could produce a negative coronavirus test.

Angela Margos was among the first passengers in San Francisco to get on a plane to Hawaii Thursday morning.

“Vacation, peace of mind,” said Margos, a nurse from San Carlos, California, of why she’s flying to Hawaii. “I need time to relax, unwind.”

The new testing program is an effort to stem the devastating downturn the pandemic has had on Hawaii’s tourism-based economy. Officials had touted the mandatory quarantine rule as an integral part of Hawaii’s early success in keeping the coronavirus at bay.

But gaps in the pre-travel testing program coupled with increasing cases of COVID-19 across the U.S. have raised questions about whether Hawaii is ready to safely welcome back vacationers.

And when local restrictions were eased before summertime holidays, community spread of the disease spiked to alarming levels, forcing a second round of stay-at-home orders for residents and closures for non-essential businesses.

Margos ran into hiccups with getting her test. She first did it at the hospital where she works, only to find out it wasn’t an approved site for United Airlines and the state of Hawaii. She then paid $105 for a drive-thru test, but she was later informed there was an error with that test.

State officials assist visitors at the Daniel K. Inouye International Airport Thursday, Oct. 15, 2020, in Honolulu. A new pre-travel testing program will allow visitors who test negative for COVID-19 to come to Hawaii and avoid two weeks of mandatory quarantine goes into effect Thursday. The pandemic has caused a devastating downturn on Hawaii’s tourism-based economy. Coronavirus weary residents and struggling business owners in Hawaii will be watching closely as tourists begin to return to the islands. (Photo: Marco Garcia, AP)

Margos ultimately paid $250 for a fast-result test Thursday at the airport in San Francisco, which came back negative.

Opponents of the testing program have said a single test 72 hours before arrival — especially when coupled with the option to fly without a test and still quarantine — is not enough to keep island residents safe.

Kathleen Miyashita and her husband were among those who came to Hawaii Thursday without getting tested. They said they plan to quarantine at their family’s farm on Oahu.

“We chose to do the 14-day quarantine,” Miyashita said. “We have no issues with having food being brought in. It’s like a quarantining haven in terms of having fresh fruits and vegetables at home.”

She said she and her husband were “not at all” concerned about being asymptomatic carriers of the disease.

“We’ve been traveling, and we just

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Thousands arrive in Hawaii on first day pre-travel testing

Honolulu (AP) — About 8,000 people landed in Hawaii on the first day of a pre-travel testing program that allowed travelers to come to the islands without quarantining for two weeks if they could produce a negative coronavirus test.

Angela Margos was among the first passengers in San Francisco to get on a plane to Hawaii Thursday morning.

“Vacation, peace of mind,” said Margos, a nurse from San Carlos, California, of why she’s flying to Hawaii. “I need time to relax, unwind.”

The new testing program is an effort to stem the devastating downturn the pandemic has had on Hawaii’s tourism-based economy. Officials had touted the mandatory quarantine rule as an integral part of Hawaii’s early success in keeping the coronavirus at bay.

But gaps in the pre-travel testing program coupled with increasing cases of COVID-19 across the U.S. have raised questions about whether Hawaii is ready to safely welcome back vacationers.


And when local restrictions were eased before summertime holidays, community spread of the disease spiked to alarming levels, forcing a second round of stay-at-home orders for residents and closures for non-essential businesses.

Margos ran into hiccups with getting her test. She first did it at the hospital where she works, only to find out it wasn’t an approved site for United Airlines and the state of Hawaii. She then paid $105 for a drive-thru test, but she was later informed there was an error with that test.

Margos ultimately paid $250 for a fast-result test Thursday at the airport in San Francisco, which came back negative.

Opponents of the testing program have said a single test 72 hours before arrival — especially when coupled with the option to fly without a test and still quarantine — is not enough to keep island residents safe.

Kathleen Miyashita and her husband were among those who came to Hawaii Thursday without getting tested. They said they plan to quarantine at their family’s farm on Oahu.

“We chose to do the 14-day quarantine,” Miyashita said. “We have no issues with having food being brought in. It’s like a quarantining haven in terms of having fresh fruits and vegetables at home.”

She said she and her husband were “not at all” concerned about being asymptomatic carriers of the disease.

“We’ve been traveling, and we just take precautions,” she said, adding that they had already done one quarantine in Hawaii about two months ago.

Hawaii’s economy is almost entirely built around tourism, and local families who rely on the sector to survive need to return to work.

More than 100 of Hawaii’s approximately 4,000 restaurants, bakeries and caterers have closed permanently and more than 50% predict they will not survive the coming months, officials have said.

Monica Toguchi Ryan, whose family has owned and operated The Highway Inn restaurant on Oahu for over 70 years, said the lack of tourism has been crippling.

“The restaurant and service industry has suffered so much during this pandemic,” Toguchi Ryan said. “Restaurants have not received any federal

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