Tag: store

Holiday store, recreation and restauarant open; Graham-Mebane lake closes

Elizabeth Pattman
 
| Times-News

Openings

Dewey’s Bakery Holiday Fundraising Store is now open in Alamance Crossing. The store, located at 1019 Boston Drive, is a full Dewey’s Bakery store benefiting Connect 4 Faith’s Child Sexual Abuse Prevention Initiative. Fresh cookies, cakes, cheese straws and more treats are available Monday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., Saturday from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Sunday from 1 to 5 p.m. For more information, email [email protected] or call 336-850-1008.

The downtown Graham ice skating rink is now open through Dec. 20. Forty-five-minute skating sessions begin on the hour at 213 South Main Street. Skating and skate rentals are also free, but there is a small cost for concessions. Due to COVID-19, there is a maximum of 20 people on the ice at one time and masks are required on and off the ice. The rink is open 1 to 8 p.m. on Sundays, 5 to 8 p.m. Monday through Wednesday, 5 to 9 p.m. on Fridays and noon to 10 p.m. on Saturdays. On Thursday nights between 5 and 8 p.m., you can reserve the rink for just your group or family for $25. If the rink is not reserved that night, it will be open to the public. For updates or inclement weather information, visit the Graham Recreation & Parks Facebook page.

More: Alamance COVID numbers climb through Thanksgiving week

Reopenings

Hibachi Buffet at Holly Hill Mall will reopen under new ownership on Dec. 4. The restaurant will now prepare food in front of customers, rather than in a buffet style.

The Cedarock Equestrian Center reopened this week. Located at 5160 Friendship Patterson Mill Road in Burlington, the equestrian center offers 6 miles of dedicated horse trails and a riding ring. Hours of operation are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Equestrian Center and trails will close during heavy rains and inclement weather. Visit Facebook to check for closings.

More: Owners of Smitty’s Homemade Ice Cream selling business

Closings

Graham-Mebane Lake has closed for the season. The lake will reopen on Feb. 5.

Have an item for Open & Shut? Email Elizabeth Pattman at [email protected] anytime.

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Wynwood may be getting an eco-friendly hotel at the site of the Art by God store

Art by God, the museum store specializing in furnishings and jewelry made from natural artifacts, is proceeding with negotiations for the sale of its Wynwood location. Fittingly, the site is set to become an earth-friendly hotel.

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The 21,155 square-foot store, located at 60 NE 27th St., is part of a four-parcel assemblage totaling more than 56,000 square feet and currently priced at $15.6 million. The acquisition includes three other lots at 26 NE 27 St., 25 NE 26 St. and 61 NE 26 St.

The buyer is the Miami-based Lucky Shepherd, a multi-company firm founded in 2016 that specializes in holistic wellness in technology, real estate and design.

The new owners plan to raze the existing property and build a 150-key eco-friendly lodging, with 48 residential units, a farm-to-table restaurant, a speakeasy and a rooftop pool and bar. Touzet Studio is the architect on the project. Gensler will handle the interior design. Construction is expected to begin in late 2021 and last 24-30 months.

Gene Harris, who founded Art By God Inc. in 1982, paid $350,000 for the 1.29 acre assemblage in 1997. He opened the Wynwood store on the property in 2014. The Harris family is still deciding whether to open a store at another location or go entirely online.

Andy Charry of Metro 1 (formerly of APEX Capital Realty), represented the seller. Arden Karson, managing principal of Karson & Co., together with Mika Mattingly and Cecilia Estevez with Colliers International Florida’s Urban Core Division, represented the buyer.

“Just like 2020, this transaction has been very challenging,” Charry said. “I’m grateful to everyone who is helping to push this deal to the finish line. The buyers are getting a phenomenal site.”

A COVID delay

The property, which was sold off-market, has been under contract since November 2019.

The hospitality industry has been banking on Wynwood as a lucrative hotel location to capitalize on its flood of annual visitors (more than four million in 2019, according to the Wynwood Business Improvement District).

The San Francisco-based Sonder is currently developing a 72-room hotel at 111 NE 26th St., just one block from the Wynwood Walls. The international firm Quadrum Global is developing a nine-story, 217-room hotel at a three-parcel assemblage it bought for $8.5 million at 2217 NW Miami Court.

The New York-based Domio leased an entire 175-unit building developed by The Related Group and Block Capital Group, originally intended as apartments, and is operating it as a hotel at 51 NW 26th St.

An earlier version of this story that relied on inaccurate information provided to the Miami Herald by APEX Capital Realty was incorrect. The story has been updated to reflect that the closing is expected to happen in 2021.

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©2020 Miami Herald

Visit Miami Herald at www.miamiherald.com

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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Wynwood is getting an eco-friendly hotel at the site of the Art by God store

Art by God, the museum store specializing in furnishings and jewelry made from natural artifacts, has closed on the sale of its Wynwood location. Fittingly, the site is set to become an earth-friendly hotel.

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The 13,622-square-foot property, located at 60 NE 27th St., sold for $15.1 million, or $1,108 per square foot. The buyer is the Miami-based Lucky Shepherd, a multi-company firm founded in 2016 that specializes in holistic wellness in technology, real estate and design.

The new owners plan to raze the existing property and build a 150-key eco-friendly lodging, with 48 residential units and two studios, a farm-to-table restaurant, a speakeasy and a rooftop pool and bar. Touzet Studio is the architect on the project. Gensler will handle the interior design.

Gene Harris, who founded Art By God Inc. in 1982, paid $350,000 for the former warehouse, or $25.60 per square foot, in 1997 before converting it into a store in 2014.

“He is an art dealer that has been in Wynwood for many months, seeing all the new development in Wynwood,” said Miguel Pinto, president and managing broker of APEX Capital Realty, which represented the seller. “He was there before any of the new developments. Naturally, his land value went through the roof. It was a good opportunity for him.”

Mika Mattingly of Colliers International and Michael Light of Douglas Elliman represented the buyer.

A COVID delay

The property, which was sold off-market, had been under contract since November 2019.

Pinto said the delay in closing, which was a collaboration between the three brokerage firms, was due to the difficulty of finding financing for a hotel during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“Hospitality has been one of the hardest-hit sectors and having a developer willing to move forward with a land acquisition of over $15 million and having the foresight that COVID is temporary and will go away speaks volumes for them,” Pinto said. “People who understand the market really get it. At the same time, people are being cautious because they do not want to catch a falling knife.”

The hospitality industry has been banking on Wynwood as a lucrative hotel location to capitalize on its flood of annual visitors (more than four million in 2019, according to the Wynwood Business Improvement District).

The San Francisco-based Sonder is currently developing a 72-room hotel at 111 NE 26th St., just one block from the Wynwood Walls. The international firm Quadrum Global is developing a nine-story, 217-room hotel at a three-parcel assemblage it bought for $8.5 million at 2217 NW Miami Court.

The New York-based Domio leased an entire 175-unit building developed by The Related Group and Block Capital Group, originally intended as apartments, and is operating it as a hotel at 51 NW 26th St.

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©2020 Miami Herald

Visit Miami Herald at www.miamiherald.com

Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

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IMPACT: Frontline grocery store worker surprised with vacation and donation made in her name

Meet Brenda Stroble, the “mama” of Giant Food’s with a huge heart for others.

FALLS CHURCH, Va. — For months now, we’ve seen the work of everyday heroes in our community, wearing masks, shields and capes as they stock shelves to keep our families safe.

Brenda Stroble is one of them. She’s a fixture of her neighborhood working as a “Cash Office Lead” at Giant Food since 1984.

Stroble is leading a brand new team that opened a new store right as COVID-19 hit our area. When we met her, she thought WUSA9 was coming to talk about being on the frontlines during this pandemic.

“Morning Ms. Brenda, how are you?” WUSA9’s Lesli Foster asked. “We’re just trying to explain to people what it’s like for all of you who have been working so hard during this pandemic.”

But instead, our Impact team had a big surprise, for the “mama” of the store with a big heart.

“I have never met anybody like Brenda, in my whole life,” Giant manager Bill Randall said. “She makes it very happy to come to work every day.”

“The whole time that I’ve known her, she’s been always about someone else,” another coworker said about Stroble.

Foster asked Stroble what the best part of her daily job is. 

“Helping somebody in need, that is the best part about it,” she said. 

Then, Foster got to do something she’s always wanted to do

“Good morning, and attention shoppers,” Foster boomed over the loud speaker. “We have a special special celebration coming up today, in the floral section. So while you’re shopping in the aisles, if you could join us over in the floral section for just a moment. You won’t want to miss it.”

The pair walked over to the floral department where many of Stroble’s coworkers were waiting to surprise her, and celebrate her. 

“Oh, my God!” Stroble said, clearly shocked. “Oh, wow.”

Stroble calls her colleagues her family and in her free time she helps other families who are experiencing homelessness.

“You are a true servant leader in every way possible,” Foster said. 

Randall then made a special presentation. 

“We made a donation to Mount Pleasant Baptist Church at $250 on your behalf,” he said to Stroble.

Stroble was also presented with a gift basket filled with her favorite things.

But that wasn’t the end of the surprises for this shero.

“We have some friends with visit Myrtle Beach that heard about you as well,” Foster said. “And they wanted us to give this to you.”

Foster handed Stroble an envelope, with a piece of paper inside that said: “You are a winner of a vacation in sunny Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.”

“Oh my god!” Stroble exclaimed. “Thank you so much. Thank you, everybody. God bless you all. Thank you.”

“The big deal is that an entire community wanted to come together to say thank you for all that you’ve given,” Foster said. And our friends at visit Myrtle Beach hope that you

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Marriott, Tacoma, jewelry store, apartments, open

The long-awaited Marriott Tacoma Downtown opened Wednesday.

Located at 1538 Commerce St., the hotel is next door to the Greater Tacoma Convention Center.

The News Tribune reported that the hotel has 22 floors and 304 guest rooms.

BIRD UP AT NEW JEWELRY STORE

The Purple Peacock has opened a permanent location in Point Ruston at 5103 N. Main St.

According to its website, the business offers jewelry, furniture, home décor and gifts.

It will be open Monday through Thursday from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.

MORE APARTMENTS OPEN AT POINT RUSTON

The Village on Main apartments have opened their doors at Point Ruston.

Located at 5020 Main St. in Tacoma, the apartments are advertised as being pet friendly and with underground parking availability.

In post on social media, the locations are listed as actively leasing and available for tours.

Chase Hutchinson is the reporter for The Peninsula Gateway. He previously covered art and culture for The News Tribune as well as writing film reviews. He got his start in journalism at The Puget Sound Trail, the college paper of the University of Puget Sound from where he graduated.

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