Tag: shortterm

Deaths at Kendall home raise issues with short-term vacation rental operation

KENDALL, Fla. – The luxury home in Kendall that turned into a crime scene on Tuesday after two mysterious deaths had been flagged by code enforcement officers over violations during the coronavirus pandemic.

Since June, Miami-Dade County code enforcement officers had issued a series of citations related to not following COVID-19 emergency orders pertaining to short-term rentals.

The citations at the home at 19330 SW 136 St. had triggered a three-strike rule that code compliance said puts the owner’s certificate of use in jeopardy of being revoked.

The rule, which is part of the measures Miami-Dade authorities are taking to keep coronavirus infections under control, also included a police watch order for five weeks over the Summer.

Property records show Michael P. Hanna is the owner of the home. He could not be reached for comment. Records show he is a licensed real estate broker with an active certificate of use to operate a short-term vacation rental at his home.

Mystery at Kendall mansion: Detectives ask public for help solving case of 2 deaths
Mystery at Kendall mansion: Detectives ask public for help solving case of 2 deaths

On Tuesday, there were advertisements for the home on several short-term rentals including Airbnb, which profiled the home as a “Lake House Villa” with 5 bedrooms. The profile had been removed by Wednesday.

David Martinez was among the neighbors who had complained about the home’s suspicious houseguests and disruptive parties. He said the short-term rental operation at the home had become a threat to the quiet family-friendly neighborhood.

As crime scene investigators gathered evidence in the home on Tuesday, Martinez said the situation was so dire that seeing a Crime Scene Investigation van there didn’t shock him.

A crime scene investigations' van is parked in front of a home where two people were found dead on Tuesday in Kendall.
A crime scene investigations’ van is parked in front of a home where two people were found dead on Tuesday in Kendall. (Copyright 2020 by WPLG Local10.com – All rights reserved.)

“We knew something was going to happen,” Martinez said.

On Wednesday evening, the death investigations were still ongoing and the police department had not released any more information about the case.

Detectives were asking anyone with information about the death investigations to call Miami-Dade Crime Stoppers at 305-471-8477.

Copyright 2020 by WPLG Local10.com – All rights reserved.

Source Article

Continue reading

Short-term vacation rentals in Henderson will operate under stricter rules

The Henderson City Council voted unanimously Tuesday to implement stricter regulations of short-term vacation rentals.

City officials have said they commonly received complaints about noise, trash and the number of rentals within neighborhoods. Council members voted to allow the units in residential areas last year.

Included in the updated rules is a requirement for newly registered rental homes to be located at least 1,000 feet away from other short-term rentals.

Guests must use all on-site parking before parking on the street, and complaints about guests must be resolved faster than before. The update also includes stricter enforcement, such as increased fines.

The vote came one day after proponents of short-term rental properties threatened to sue the city over provisions they considered unconstitutional. Henderson said it has clear legal authority to regulate property and land use.

One of the provisions the group took issue with was a proposal to cap the number of days a non-owner-occupied unit may be rented at 21 per month. The city removed that provision before passing the new law.

Proponents of the rentals also took issue with the new distance requirement.

The council on Tuesday considered adopting a change that would have implemented a 1,000-foot distance requirement in rural neighborhoods and a 660-foot distance requirement everywhere else in the city, but ultimately decided against it.

Instead, the 1,000-foot requirement will be in effect throughout Henderson. Homeowner associations maintain the authority to prohibit short-term rentals in their neighborhoods.

Units that already are registered as short-term rentals will be grandfathered in and will not be forced to comply with the new distance requirement.

A moratorium on new rental registrations is due to expire at the end of the month. Council members plan to review the short-term rental program in one year.

Contact Blake Apgar at [email protected] or 702-387-5298. Follow @blakeapgar on Twitter.

Source Article

Continue reading

Phoenix Planning And Development Department Launches New On-Line Services For Short-Term Vacation Rental Property Registrations And Searches

November 6, 2020

Searching for or registering a short-term vacation rental property in Phoenix is a lot easier now, thanks to a new online self-registration portal. The city of Phoenix’s Planning and Development Department just launched the portal that will make the registration process more efficient for property owners. It will also make it easier to find rentals and the owner’s emergency contact information by surrounding property owners should there be management issues.

In 2019, the Arizona Legislature authorized municipalities to create provisions for short-term vacation rentals (Arizona Revised Statutes (A.R.S. §9-500.39) to help manage them as the law requires all cities to allow them within their city. Phoenix adopted the Short-Term Vacation Rental Ordinance (G-6653) in early 2020, to implement the law passed by the State Legislature.

The Short-Term Vacation Rental Ordinance (ORDINANCE G-6653) requires owners of short-term or vacation rentals to register with the city and provide emergency and complaint contact information. The ordinance outlines vacation rental violations and reaffirms prohibited types of uses, such as banquet halls and large parties, and introduces an enhanced penalty structure.

Two new features have been added to the website and takes customers directly to the online PHX At Your Service Portals. Property owners should visit https://www.phoenix.gov/pdd/codes-ordinances/short-term-rentals to register their short-term vacation rental property. Neighbors impacted by a short-term vacation rental property should visit that site to find the contact information for the manager of that property to communicate about renter issues.


This press release was produced by the City of Phoenix. The views expressed here are the author’s own.

Source Article

Continue reading

Cathedral City hiring compliance officers for short-term vacation rentals

CLOSE

While many hotels are open for business, an influx of travelers heading to the Coachella Valley is fueling an unexpected boost in summer demand for vacation rentals.

Wochit

Cathedral City residents worried about loud, late night parties coming from nearby short-term vacation rental properties may be able to rest a little easier. The city’s task force to deal with the issue is expected to begin patrolling across all shifts Nov. 13. 

Four, full-time short-term vacation rental compliance officers are in the process of being hired, Cathedral City Police Chief George Crum said during the city council meeting on Wednesday. Each officer will be assigned to a patrol team and supervised by a sergeant. 

A fifth employee hired by the department will be assigned to the office and will work closely with an administrative analyst hired recently to coordinate with the police personnel. 

The six employees were hired to address short-term vacation rental violations following many months of city council discussions and planning on the issue. 

In June 2019, city leaders approved a temporary ban on new short-term rental applications amid noise concerns from residents. This past summer, the council directed city staff to move forward with a proposal to phase out short-term rentals in residential neighborhoods over two years, with exceptions for properties in homeowners’ associations and home-sharing rentals. And, last month, they voted unanimously to phase out short-term vacation rentals by 2023 despite concerns from homeowners who said it would cause them financial harm.

Special election? Cathedral City group opposed to rental ban submits petition

Residents speak up: Cathedral City survey sheds light on short-term vacation rentals

Earlier this month, after a short-term rental advocacy group submitted thousands of signatures in hopes of repealing the decision, the council unanimously approved an urgency ordinance and two resolutions related to a moratorium on new short-term vacation rentals and fees, penalties and fines. 

If enough petition signatures are verified, the city’s recently approved short-term rental ordinance will be suspended, City Attorney Eric Vail said previously. 

The short-term rental phase-out ordinance has exemptions for properties located in homeowners associations, which may have their own specific short-term rental rules. “Home-sharing” arrangements, where a permanent resident is staying at the property, are allowed under the ordinance.

The ordinance put a maximum on how many people can stay at a property, set a minimum contract of three nights, and called for stricter enforcement.

“Everyone recognizes that resident frustration is driven by a lack of enforcement from the city,” said Karyn McQueen, spokesperson for the advocacy group Share Cathedral City, this month. “We are hopeful that the council will rescind their ordinance and work with the community to come up with a better alternative that addresses community concerns while allowing vacation rentals to continue welcoming visitors to Cathedral City.”

Related: California desert vacation rentals proving a popular pandemic-era getaway

Palm Springs: City sees spike in vacation rental complaints. No changes to ordinance

Part of the city’s earlier ordinance included application and registration fees for new and

Continue reading

Hawaii’s short-term vacation rental business is still showing signs of struggle since the recent lifting of the COVID ban

COVID-19 restrictions banning short-term vacation rentals just lifted on Oahu, which moved into Tier 2 of its economic reopening Thursday.

That means roughly 800 short-term vacation rental properties on Oahu, which had been sidelined by Honolulu Mayor Kirk Caldwell’s pandemic restrictions since April 7, are now allowed to resume business like their neighbor island counterparts.

Short-term rentals, which rented for 30 days or less and weren’t being used to quarantine guests, have been allowed to operate on Hawaii island and Kauai and in Maui County since the middle of June, when the state’s first pandemic-inspired interisland quarantine was lifted. That didn’t change even after Aug. 11, when a partial interisland quarantine was reinstated for the counties of Kauai, Hawaii, Maui and Kalawao.

Still, it’s not exactly been smooth sailing for vacation rentals statewide, which have suffered from a COVID-19-related plunge in travel demand just like hotels, airlines and any other member of Hawaii’s visitor industry.

Overall, travel demand in September was still depressed significantly by the requirement that all out-of-state passengers abide by a 14-day self-quarantine. It wasn’t until Oct. 15 that the state launched a pre-arrivals testing program that allows some travelers to bypass the quarantine.

Even before the pandemic, Oahu’s short-term rental industry was more restricted than in other counties. Honolulu allows short-term rental lodging only in resort and certain apartment-zoned districts, unless the property is one of the roughly 800 or so that were issued a nonconforming use certificate back in 1989 and have maintained it.

Ordinance 19-18, otherwise known as Bill 89, created means for the city to issue roughly 1,700 permits to allow bed-and-breakfast homes to operate. However, there’s a bill to push back the start date for permits to Jan. 31 because of the pandemic.

In September, Caldwell didn’t yet consider Oahu short-term rental as essential businesses. But the isle’s owners and suppliers realized the highest, albeit still low, September occupancy statewide.

According to a report released Friday by the Hawaii Tourism Authority, using data from Transparent Intelligence, Oahu’s vacation rental occupancy for September fell to 14.5%, a 59 percentage point drop from September 2019. Oahu’s vacation rental supply fell more than 56% to 97,989 units. Oahu’s demand dropped to 14,160 units, but the nearly 92% drop wasn’t quite as steep as that experienced by Maui or Kauai.

September occupancy at Maui County vacation rentals decreased 68.8 percentage points to 5.4%. Maui’s supply declined more than 48% to 151,521, and demand dropped more than 96%, the most of any island, to 8,151.

Kauai’s vacation rental occupancy fell 62.3 percentage points to 5.6%. Kauai’s supply fell nearly 49% to 62,133, while demand decreased nearly 96% to 3,500.

Hawaii island’s occupancy declined 49.2 percentage points to 10.7%. Hawaii island’s supply dropped about 57% to 89,813, and demand decreased more than 92% to 9,620.

Despite the economic devastation that tourism lockdowns have caused Hawaii’s vacation rental industry, not all Hawaii residents support allowing them to operate during the pandemic, especially since the the Honolulu Department of Planning

Continue reading

Stiffer penalties, fines proposed for problem short-term rentals

Stiffer fines and penalties, including a two-strikes rule, plus a required workshop for prospective vacation rental owners are among recommendations for changes to the city’s ordinance an ad-hoc committee is proposing to help address some short-term vacation rental problems in La Quinta.



a sign on a pole: La Quinta is a city in the eastern Coachella Valley.


© Jay Calderon/The Desert Sun
La Quinta is a city in the eastern Coachella Valley.

City officials are studying ways to address and reduce complaints that have led to a moratorium on all new permits in La Quinta. 

Loading...

Load Error

The city currently has 1,290 permitted short-term vacation rentals. The moratorium is in effect until Feb. 2 but could be lifted earlier if an amended ordinance is adopted.

“We’ve had short-term rentals since 2008,” Mayor Pro Tem John Peña said, and when problems have come up, the city has addressed them by amending the ordinance.

But COVID-19 brought an increase in short-term vacation rentals when hotels and resorts were closed and people found them to be a safe way to get away amid the pandemic.

“This is the first year we’ve had the kinds of problems that we’ve had and it’s because of the pandemic. People are working from home, kids … can go to school from wherever they’re located as long as they have internet,” Pena said.

In August, the city issued a 90-day moratorium on all new permits after seeing a 267% increase in noise and other complaints over a three-month period, to give its ad-hoc committee time to zero in on the problems and recommend solutions. The council extended the moratorium to Feb. 2 earlier this month, with the hope it can be lifted sooner.

“We are trying to get to the core issue … and solve it,” Councilmember Robert Radi said.

La Quinta is not the only city in the Coachella Valley trying to address increased numbers of short-term vacation rentals and complaints since COVID-19 hit.

Cathedral City wants to phase them out all together by 2023.

Palm Desert, which already has a ban on short-term vacation rentals in single-family residential neighborhoods zoned R-1 and R-2 recently issued a moratorium on permits in areas zoned planned residential, except where allowed by the HOAs.

Rancho Mirage is in the process of eliminating short-term vacation rentals in all but private neighborhoods where they are allowed by the homeowners’ associations.

Palm Springs has also seen an uptick in complaints and citations issued, but currently has no plans to change its ordinance.

More applications, more complaints

La Quinta has received 93 new short-term vacation rental permits from April through June, with 16 more filed and waiting to be processed the day the moratorium was issued, officials said.

The city’s code compliance team reported 310 new cases of possible violations were opened as well, from April through June – a 267% increase over the 67 filed from January through March – all stemming from calls to a city hotline, staff said.

Nine permits were suspended in response to the complaints, officials said.

More than 90% of the complaints were

Continue reading

La Quinta short-term vacation rentals: Stiffer penalties, fines proposed

CLOSE
Buy Photo

La Quinta is a city in the eastern Coachella Valley. (Photo: Jay Calderon/The Desert Sun)

Stiffer fines and penalties, including a two-strikes rule, plus a required workshop for prospective vacation rental owners are among recommendations for changes to the city’s ordinance an ad-hoc committee is proposing to help address some short-term vacation rental problems in La Quinta.

City officials are studying ways to address and reduce complaints that have led to a moratorium on all new permits in La Quinta. 

The city currently has 1,290 permitted short-term vacation rentals. The moratorium is in effect until Feb. 2 but could be lifted earlier if an amended ordinance is adopted.

“We’ve had short-term rentals since 2008,” Mayor Pro Tem John Peña said, and when problems have come up, the city has addressed them by amending the ordinance.

But COVID-19 brought an increase in short-term vacation rentals when hotels and resorts were closed and people found them to be a safe way to get away amid the pandemic.

“This is the first year we’ve had the kinds of problems that we’ve had and it’s because of the pandemic. People are working from home, kids … can go to school from wherever they’re located as long as they have internet,” Pena said.

In August, the city issued a 90-day moratorium on all new permits after seeing a 267% increase in noise and other complaints over a three-month period, to give its ad-hoc committee time to zero in on the problems and recommend solutions. The council extended the moratorium to Feb. 2 earlier this month, with the hope it can be lifted sooner.

“We are trying to get to the core issue … and solve it,” Councilmember Robert Radi said.

La Quinta is not the only city in the Coachella Valley trying to address increased numbers of short-term vacation rentals and complaints since COVID-19 hit.

Cathedral City wants to phase them out all together by 2023.

Palm Desert, which already has a ban on short-term vacation rentals in single-family residential neighborhoods zoned R-1 and R-2 recently issued a moratorium on permits in areas zoned planned residential, except where allowed by the HOAs.

Rancho Mirage is in the process of eliminating short-term vacation rentals in all but private neighborhoods where they are allowed by the homeowners’ associations.

Palm Springs has also seen an uptick in complaints and citations issued, but currently has no plans to change its ordinance.

More applications, more complaints

La Quinta has received 93 new short-term vacation rental permits from April through June, with 16 more filed and waiting to be processed the day the moratorium was issued, officials said.

The city’s code compliance team reported 310 new cases of possible violations were opened as well, from April through June – a 267% increase over the 67 filed from January through March – all stemming from calls to a city hotline, staff said.

Nine permits were suspended in response to the complaints, officials said.

More than 90% of the complaints

Continue reading

Temporary Changes In Travel Result In Increased Demand For Short-Term Rentals

Kellie Rastegar is Co-Founder and Creative Director at Rastegar Property Group.

A surge of Americans taking road trips this summer and fall is affecting the hospitality industry’s real estate. The trend is growing as people look for ways to enjoy time off during the pandemic in remote locations, where it is easier to distance from others.

For example, the RV Industry Association reported 46 million Americans plan to go on a trip in an RV this year. Whether they already own an RV or needed to purchase or rent one, this enables a family to potentially camp in the RV while on vacation, rather than reserve a hotel room or a short-term rental. Look to the National Park Service for evidence of this surge in popularity: Reservations to enter or camp in parks are booked almost immediately upon being opened to the public.

Overall, long-term vacation planning isn’t something that’s typically happening this year. GasBuddy.com reports that 24% of people planned to take shorter trips that don’t involve flying. People appear more inclined toward a somewhat spontaneous trip that’s closer to home, which opens up possibilities for last-minute hotel bookings. 

Part of the demand comes from parents who want to be able to get outside with their kids. Young, unmarried professionals are looking for something outside of their daily routine during time off from work. More time outdoors also opens the opportunity for a lake house or beach condo rentals. Renting a single-family home for vacation is especially appealing in the pandemic environment because it minimizes your chance of exposure from others. Often, renting a single-family home allows for virtual check-ins, rather than entering a lobby full of people. 

After a dramatic drop when the pandemic began in March, since the start of summer, Airbnb has reported an increase in demand for rentals. The company “saw more nights booked for U.S. listings between May 17 and June 3 than the same period in 2019.”

It’s also worth noting that some changes in vacation rental trends were well on their way before the Covid-19 pandemic began. For example, for years now, pet owners have opted for vacation rentals that allow them to bring a dog, as opposed to traditional hotels with no-pet policies. It’s a worldwide trend, with 42% of people surveyed reporting they prefer to bring their pets with them on vacation.

Quirkiness in vacation rentals is also another trend among millennials. A recent report by Vrbo shows 71% of millennials would rather stay in a nontraditional rental. Teepees, igloos, travel boats and tiny houses are just some of the unique options appealing to one of America’s most youthful generations.

One of the strongest trends this year, though, is the increase in long-term vacation rentals. For the first time in modern history, a vast majority of Americans can work from anywhere. As a result, Zillow reports listings for rentals with terms less than six months increased by 23% from March 1 to May 21. The arrangement creates a

Continue reading

Vacation Rentals: Search Short-Term Rentals

Are you bored with the ordinary and craving a vacation that fits your family perfectly? That vacation rental getaway you’ve been eyeing will allow you to see the world through a new lens, explore attractions and relish the unfamiliar. Pack your bags and go for it!

When you reserve one of our money-saving vacation rentals, you can travel in style with easy access to adventures around every corner. Revel in the privacy of your own space as you map out your travels or put your feet up after a day of excursions. There are so many options to pick from – an ocean front condo rental to a creek-side mountain cabin.

As tempting as it sounds to simply rest and recharge in one of the best short-term rentals in town, there is food to sample, sights to see and memories to make! Venture into the city, discover its history, explore the cultural exhibits and truly taste the vibrant flavors of the new world around you. Then make yourself at home in your inviting rental space and take a well-deserved break or whip up a feast with local market delicacies.

Whether you’re in the mood for a cozy apartment, spacious residence or sumptuous villa, there’s a rental with your name on it. When you book through Expedia, you have access to all kinds of short-term homes to ensure you find your perfect match. What are you waiting for? Your dream vacation is on the horizon!

Source Article

Continue reading

Some short-term vacation rentals, hotels pushing to reopen on Oregon coast

Counties on the Oregon coast have begun planning – and in some cases taking — small steps toward reopening vacation rentals, hotels and RV parks amid the ongoing coronavirus pandemic.

On Friday, for instance, Coos County lifted its ban on short-term vacation rentals, though officials asked operators not to promote tourism or encourage visitors for now.

Gov. Kate Brown has talked about “Phase 1” of reopening Oregon businesses. Think of this as “Phase .25,” said Coos County Chair Melissa Cribbins.

“We see this as a baby step toward reopening,” she said.

Cribbins estimates the county is home to about 100 short-term rentals.

In neighboring Curry County, commissioners discussed lifting their ban on short-term lodging as early as Friday but then postponed the vote until next week after pushback from residents worried about public health.

Lincoln County commissioners and eight cities and towns in the county agreed last week to extend their ordinances restricting hotels and other short-term lodging establishments until the end of May, said board Chair Kaety Jacobson.

She said the county’s ban has exceptions for essential workers and others, such as people who live in hotels. She said the county also has made exceptions for people in need of emergency lodging.

After hordes of spring break visitors descended on the coast in March, many communities enacted ordinances that severely limited hotels, motels and other forms of lodging hoping to discourage visitors who, they thought, could spread the virus and overwhelm their hospitals.

The coastal bans in general did not shut down lodging but instead restricted their operation to certain situations, like essential workers, people staying more than 30 days and victims of domestic violence.

But now with the number of confirmed coronavirus cases in coastal communities remaining low, county leaders are tiptoeing their way toward kickstarting their battered economies.

Jason Brandt, president and CEO of the Oregon Restaurant & Lodging Association, said parts of the state with few known cases should be allowed to open “in a responsible way.”

“Based on the data and the cases I do think there is a path forward,” he said, “but we have to be careful to make sure people understand that this is not the time to be promoting leisure travel.”

It’s hard to know what practical effect reopening will have since many people are still staying home and many destinations remain closed.

“The beaches are closed,” Cribbins said. “The dunes are closed. The parks are closed and the restaurants are closed.”

“It’s a terrible time to go on vacation,” she said.

Curry County has had four confirmed COVID-19 cases; none required hospitalization in the county’s 16-bed medical center, local officials said.

In Coos County, all of the confirmed cases are tied to an outbreak at Shutter Creek Correctional Institution, a state prison where 19 inmates and two employees have tested positive for the virus.

Officials on the coast have sounded desperate when they talk about the need to reopen.

In an April 22 board meeting, Curry County Chair Chris Paasch

Continue reading