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Mayor was on vacation in Mexico while urging residents to stay home

The mayor of Austin, Texas, on Wednesday apologized for attending a wedding and traveling to Mexico for a vacation after urging residents to stay home in an effort to slow the spread of coronavirus.



Steve Adler wearing a suit and tie


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Steve Adler

“I want you to know that I regret that travel,” Mayor Steve Adler said in a video statement. “I wouldn’t travel now. I didn’t over Thanksgiving, and I won’t over Christmas, and no one should. Everyone should be avoiding non-essential travel now because we are in the orange area.”

Adler, the two-term mayor of Austin, said he attended a small, private wedding for his daughter in November and then traveled with his family to Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. In a video filmed from his vacation, Adler urged residents to stay home, citing the rising number of coronavirus cases. “We need to stay home if you can,” he said. “Do everything you can to try to keep the numbers down. This is not the time to relax.”

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He first revealed he was on vacation in an interview with the Austin American-Statesman. 

“I recognize that the fact that I took that trip, and at the same time, was continuing to urge people to be cautious is confusing,” Adler said in his apology Wednesday. “I know that others have chosen not to travel under the same circumstances, and I know that in my position, I need to send a clearer message. I’m sorry I took that trip. It was a lapse in judgment, and I want you to know that I apologize.”

Adler said his actions set a “bad example” to the people of Austin but he did not break any established COVID-19 restrictions for the city. At the time, the city was operating under its Stage 3 health recommendations, which urges residents to avoid gatherings of more than 10 people. 

Adler told the Austin American-Statesman that 20 people attended the wedding. He said his daughter originally invited 100 people but disinvited most of the attendees. “It’s a hard thing for a girl to do, but there are girls all over the city that are having to do the same kind of thing, couples all over the city that are having to do the same kind of thing,” Adler said. 

Austin is located in Travis County, where there are currently over 2,600 active virus cases and 222 hospitalizations, according to health officials. More than 486 people have died from the virus there during the pandemic. 

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Austin mayor apologizes for urging residents to stay home while on vacation in Mexico

The mayor of Austin, Texas, on Wednesday apologized for attending a wedding and traveling to Mexico for a vacation after urging residents to stay home in an effort to slow the spread of coronavirus.

“I want you to know that I regret that travel,” Mayor Steve Adler said in a video statement. “I wouldn’t travel now. I didn’t over Thanksgiving, and I won’t over Christmas, and no one should. Everyone should be avoiding non-essential travel now because we are in the orange area.”

Adler, the two-term mayor of Austin, said he attended a small, private wedding for his daughter in November and then traveled with his family to Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. In a video filmed from his vacation, Adler urged residents to stay home, citing the rising number of coronavirus cases. “We need to stay home if you can,” he said. “Do everything you can to try to keep the numbers down. This is not the time to relax.”

He first revealed he was on vacation in an interview with the Austin American-Statesman. 

“I recognize that the fact that I took that trip, and at the same time, was continuing to urge people to be cautious is confusing,” Adler said in his apology Wednesday. “I know that others have chosen not to travel under the same circumstances, and I know that in my position, I need to send a clearer message. I’m sorry I took that trip. It was a lapse in judgment, and I want you to know that I apologize.”

Adler said his actions set a “bad example” to the people of Austin but he did not break any established COVID-19 restrictions for the city. At the time, the city was operating under its Stage 3 health recommendations, which urges residents to avoid gatherings of more than 10 people. 

Adler told the Austin American-Statesman that 20 people attended the wedding. He said his daughter originally invited 100 people but disinvited most of the attendees. “It’s a hard thing for a girl to do, but there are girls all over the city that are having to do the same kind of thing, couples all over the city that are having to do the same kind of thing,” Adler said. 

Austin is located in Travis County, where there are currently over 2,600 active virus cases and 222 hospitalizations, according to health officials. More than 486 people have died from the virus there during the pandemic. 

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Mayor of Austin, Texas, apologizes for taking Mexico vacation while urging residents to stay home

The mayor of Austin, Texas, has apologized for traveling to Mexico during the pandemic.

Responding to a story first reported Wednesday in The Austin American-Statesman, the mayor, Steve Adler, admitted he traveled in early November to Cabo San Lucas, Mexico — and while abroad, he even recorded a message urging Austinites to stay home to combat the spread of the coronavirus.

In a video posted online Wednesday, Adler said, “I need to set a clearer example so that my message is unambiguous, and for the failure to do that I sincerely apologize.”

In the message, Adler said that his daughter, “like many other brides,” had to cancel her wedding plans because of public health rules, and “instead she had a small, mostly family, very private wedding.”

“Most importantly, she was happy,” Adler said. “Afterwards, a small, mostly family group traveled to Mexico.”

“I want you to know I regret that travel. I wouldn’t travel now, I didn’t over Thanksgiving, and I wouldn’t over Christmas — and no one should, everyone should be avoiding nonessential travel now because we are in the orange area,” Adler said, referring to the fourth-highest level of the city’s color-coded chart.

Adler worried that his travel, which he said “took place during a safer period,” might “lead to some taking riskier behavior now.”

Adler called his decision to go to Mexico a “bad example” and “confusing” and said he needs “to send a clearer message.”

“I’m sorry I took that trip. It was a lapse in judgment, and I want you to know I apologize,” he said.

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Austin Mayor Steve Adler Apologizes After Telling Residents To Stay Home To Stop COVID-19 Spread As He Left For Mexican Vacation

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Austin Mayor Steve Adler Apologizes After Telling Residents To Stay Home To Stop COVID-19 Spread As He Left For Mexican VacationThe backlash continues after Austin Mayor Steve Adler hosted a wedding in early November, then hopped on a plane bound for Cabo San Lucas — all this after warning Austinites about an impending COVID-19 surge and urging them to stay home. Katie Johnston reports.

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North Texas Restaurants, Bars Talk Of Impact If Openings Scaled Back Due To High Covid-19 HospitalizationsMichael Levy, General Manager of Desperados, his family’s Mexican restaurants in Garland and Dallas, put it this way. “If you’re going to be a bullrider, and they open that gate, and tell you to hold on for that eight seconds, that bull is knocking all over and that’s what it’s been like.”

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Wednesday Evening News BriefHere’s what made

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UK nursing home residents may have to travel for vaccine, official says

A British official on Thursday said that some nursing home residents may have to travel to receive the coronavirus vaccine.



UK nursing home residents may have to travel for vaccine, official says


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UK nursing home residents may have to travel for vaccine, official says

“The [National Health Service], the [Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency] are working really hard, right now, to try and find a solution, so that we can get this into care homes if we possibly can … at this point, there is no absolute assurance of that,” Deputy Chief Medical Officer Jonathan Van-Tam told ITV’s “This Morning,” according to Reuters.

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The UK on Wednesday became the first country to grant emergency authorization to Pfizer’s vaccine for the virus. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is set to decide on a similar authorization for the drug next week.

Prime Minister Boris Johnson has warned the government is still working out the challenges of distributing the vaccine, which must be stored in extremely cold temperatures. Van-Tam said that the drug can be kept in refrigerator temperatures for up to five days, it cannot be removed from refrigeration and replaced indefinitely.

“One thing we can’t do is … end up with a vaccine that’s been handled incorrectly, and then isn’t properly viable at the end of the distribution chain,” he said, according to the news service.

Nursing home residents and workers are among those the British government has said will take priority in the initial rollout of the vaccine.

NHS England Chief Executive Simon Stevens added that regulators will need to sign off on splitting the vaccine’s dose packs before they can be delivered to individual facilities.

“If the MHRA … as we expect they will, give approval for a safe way of splitting these packs of 975 doses, then, the good news is that we will be able to start distributing those to care homes,” he said, according to Reuters.

Philipp Rosenbaum, the Senior Infectious Diseases Analyst at data and analytics firm GlobalData, said the UK’s size, health care system and population density, make it an “ideal” test case for distribution.

“If problems do arise, this will not bode well for distribution in countries with longer distances to vaccine distribution centers [or] less-developed infrastructure,” he said.

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Austin Mayor Steve Adler Issues Apology After Telling Residents To Stay Home To Stop COVID-19 Spread As He Left For Mexican Vacation

(CBSDFW.COM/CNN) – The backlash continues after Austin Mayor Steve Adler hosted a wedding in early November, then hopped on a plane bound for Cabo San Lucas — all this after warning Austinites about an impending COVID-19 surge and urging them to stay home.

On Wednesday the Mayor posted a video on YouTube saying that he regrets traveling to Mexico as he encouraged residents to be cautious about the spread of the coronavirus.

“The first week of November, my daughter got married here in Austin, and like many other brides, she had to cancel her original plans in order to follow the rules, and instead she had a small mostly family, very private wedding,” he said. “Afterward, a small, mostly family group traveled to Mexico.”

“I want you to know that I regret that travel. I wouldn’t travel now. I didn’t over Thanksgiving, and I won’t over Christmas, and no one should. Everyone should be avoiding non-essential travel now because we are in the orange area,” he said.

Austin Mayor Steve Adler. (credit: Philippe Lopez/AFP via Getty Images)

Orange is Stage 4 on the Austin Public Health (APH) color-coded chart, according to the city’s website. The risk-based guidelines set out five stages of risk, from the lowest threat, Stage 1, through the most serious, Stage 5.

The chart is published to help residents of Austin-Travis County understand the stages of risk and provide recommendations on what people should do to stay safe during the COVID-19 pandemic, according to the website.

In the video message, Adler said, “Now, I fear that the travel that I did, which took place during a safer period, followed the color-coded rules, could lead to some taking riskier behavior now.”

At the time, Austin was under Stage 3 health recommendations, which meant people were advised to avoid social gatherings greater than 10 people, but there were no restrictions or recommendations made on avoiding non-essential travel, according to the city.

“I recognize that my travel set a bad example. I recognize that the fact that I took that trip, and at the same time, was continuing to urge people to be cautious is confusing,” he added.

“I know that others have chosen not to travel under the same circumstances, and I know that in my position, I need to send a clearer message. I’m sorry I took that trip. It was a lapse in judgment, and I want you to know that I apologize.”

Adler’s travels came to light when the Austin American-Statesman published an article on December 2 that reported that a video Adler posted to Facebook on November 9 was taken during his stay in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico.

In the November 9 video, Adler talked about COVID-19 trends in Austin, saying, “The thrust of the most important message is trying to get out to the community right now is that our numbers are increasing, and everybody has to be aware of that, and we need to stay home if you can. Do everything you can

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Austin mayor regrets vacation to Mexico where he filmed video instructing residents that they ‘need to stay home’

The mayor of Austin, Texas, said Wednesday that he regretted going on vacation last month to Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, where he filmed a Facebook video instructing residents that they “need to stay home.”



Steve Adler wearing a suit and tie: Austin mayor regrets vacation to Mexico where he filmed video instructing residents that they 'need to stay home'


© Getty Images
Austin mayor regrets vacation to Mexico where he filmed video instructing residents that they ‘need to stay home’

Austin Mayor Steve Adler (D) told The Hill in a statement that he regretted the trip after the Austin American-Statesman reported it on Wednesday.

“I regret this travel,” he said. “I wouldn’t travel now, didn’t over Thanksgiving and won’t over Christmas.”

“But my fear is that this travel, even having happened during a safer period, could be used by some as justification for risky behavior,” Adler said. “In hindsight, and even though it violated no order, it set a bad example for which I apologize.”

Adler reportedly took a private jet with seven other individuals to visit a family timeshare for a week in Cabo after holding an outdoor wedding and reception for his daughter in Austin.

A day after arriving, Adler addressed the city in a Facebook video, requesting residents stay home, according to the Statesman. In the video, he did not reveal that he was outside of the city and country.

“We need to stay home, if you can,” he said in the video at the time. “Do everything you can to try to keep the numbers down. This is not the time to relax. We are going to be looking really closely.”

“We may have to close things down if we are not careful,” Adler added.

The mayor defended his daughter’s wedding and travel to the newspaper, saying that neither broke his city coronavirus orders or Texas state orders.

The Statesman reported that at the time of the wedding comprising of 20 guests and vacation, Austin officials recommended limiting groups to no more than 10 people, that only at-risk people avoid non-essential trips.

“There was no recommendation for people not to travel during that period of time,” he told the Statesman. “Someone could look at me and say, ‘He traveled.’ But what they could not say is that I traveled at a time when I was telling other people not to travel.”

Adler said his family spent hours planning a safe wedding and vacation, and he discussed the matter with interim health director Mark Escott. At the wedding, the 20 guests took a rapid COVID-19 test and socially distanced, and masks were handed out but “probably not” worn the whole time, he told the newspaper.

When the mayor left for Mexico, the positivity rate was less than 4 percent in Austin, but increased while he was away. Mexico is one of the few countries that continues to allow Americans to enter as others have banned U.S. tourists amid the pandemic.

The week following his vacation, Austin officials raised the city to a Stage 4, which recommends residents avoid all nonessential travel.

News about Adler’s trip comes as people have increasingly

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Denver’s mayor urged residents to avoid Thanksgiving travel. Then he flew cross-country to see family.

On Wednesday morning, Denver Mayor Michael Hancock urged residents to stay home and meet family online for Thanksgiving to help curtail the spread of the coronavirus.



Michael Hancock wearing a suit and tie: Denver Mayor Michael Hancock apologized for flying to Mississippi to see his wife and daughter soon after urging residents to avoid holiday travel. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)


© David Zalubowski/AP
Denver Mayor Michael Hancock apologized for flying to Mississippi to see his wife and daughter soon after urging residents to avoid holiday travel. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

“Pass the potatoes, not covid. Host virtual gatherings instead of in-person dinners,” the Democrat tweeted. “Avoid travel, if you can.”

Then, less than an hour later, Hancock boarded a flight on his way to Mississippi for Thanksgiving with his wife and daughter, his spokesman Mike Strott confirmed to The Washington Post.

The move left critics blasting Hancock for appearing to ignore his own advice at a time when the coronavirus continues to rise precipitously in Colorado.

“Our Mayor has abandoned his city during one of the most critical times we needed leadership the most,” tweeted Tay Anderson, a Denver Board of Education member.

Hours later, amid mounting blowback on social media and from local politicians, the mayor apologized.

“I made my decision as a husband and father, and for those who are angry and disappointed, I humbly ask you to forgive decisions that are borne of my heart and not my head,” he tweeted.

Hancock is the latest politician blasted this month for seeming to skirt the same restrictions that have curtailed life for millions of Americans during the worsening pandemic. Last week, California Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) apologized after photos showed him at birthday party inside a high-end restaurant where no one at his table wore masks. And this week, New York Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo (D) canceled plans to host his 89-year-old mother and two daughters in Albany for Thanksgiving after critics noted that he had spent days pleading with New Yorkers to avoid family gatherings for the holidays.

Hancock, a three-term mayor elected in 2011 and a vice president of the National Conference of Democratic Mayors, has been an advocate for coronavirus restrictions. He has pushed residents to wear masks and last week warned that another stay-at-home order might be needed if cases keep rising in Colorado, which has seen covid-related hospitalizations rise in the past week by almost 13 percent.

He has also been vocal about limiting holiday get-togethers. At a virtual news conference on Friday, he suggested residents buy a small turkey and celebrate with their immediate family only. “Maybe next year we can all be together again,” he said. “I’m asking, I’m urging, I’m pleading with everyone. Please stay home.”

But just 30 minutes after tweeting his latest plea to avoid travel on Wednesday morning, Hancock boarded a flight, KUSA reported. Soon after, he was on his way to Houston for a layover before heading to Mississippi, where his daughter recently started a new job, he later tweeted.

After fierce backlash grew against his travels, Hancock offered a mea culpa and sought to explain his decision to fly despite his entreaties to avoid holiday travel,

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Denver Mayor Michael Hancock urged residents not to travel for Thanksgiving just before flying to Mississippi

Then, less than an hour later, Hancock boarded a flight on his way to Mississippi for Thanksgiving with his wife and daughter, his spokesman Mike Strott confirmed to The Washington Post.

The move left critics blasting Hancock for appearing to ignore his own advice at a time when the coronavirus continues to rise precipitously in Colorado.

“Our Mayor has abandoned his city during one of the most critical times we needed leadership the most,” tweeted Tay Anderson, a Denver Board of Education member.

Hours later, amid mounting blowback on social media and from local politicians, the mayor apologized.

“I made my decision as a husband and father, and for those who are angry and disappointed, I humbly ask you to forgive decisions that are borne of my heart and not my head,” he tweeted.

Hancock is the latest politician blasted this month for seeming to skirt the same restrictions that have curtailed life for millions of Americans during the worsening pandemic. Last week, California Gov. Gavin Newsom (D) apologized after photos showed him at birthday party inside a high-end restaurant where no one at his table wore masks. And this week, New York Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo (D) canceled plans to host his 89-year-old mother and two daughters in Albany for Thanksgiving after critics noted that he had spent days pleading with New Yorkers to avoid family gatherings for the holidays.

Hancock, a three-term mayor elected in 2011 and a vice president of the National Conference of Democratic Mayors, has been an advocate for coronavirus restrictions. He has pushed residents to wear masks and last week warned that another stay-at-home order might be needed if cases keep rising in Colorado, which has seen covid-related hospitalizations rise in the past week by almost 13 percent.

He has also been vocal about limiting holiday get-togethers. At a virtual news conference on Friday, he suggested residents buy a small turkey and celebrate with their immediate family only. “Maybe next year we can all be together again,” he said. “I’m asking, I’m urging, I’m pleading with everyone. Please stay home.”

But just 30 minutes after tweeting his latest plea to avoid travel on Wednesday morning, Hancock boarded a flight, KUSA reported. Soon after, he was on his way to Houston for a layover before heading to Mississippi, where his daughter recently started a new job, he later tweeted.

After fierce backlash grew against his travels, Hancock offered a mea culpa and sought to explain his decision to fly despite his entreaties to avoid holiday travel, a suggestion echoed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“As the holiday approached, I decided it would be safer for me to travel to see them than to have two family members travel back to Denver,” he said in his statement. “I recognize that my decision has disappointed many who believe it would have been better to spend Thanksgiving alone. As a public official, whose conduct is rightly scrutinized for the message it sends to

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Denver mayor offers apology for Thanksgiving travel after urging residents to stay home

He recognized that many people were “disappointed” by his decision.

On Wednesday, Mayor Michael B. Hancock headed to Mississippi to join his wife and daughter there, he said.

Earlier that day, the mayor told Denver ABC affiliate KMGH that during the holiday, “if you can, remain in your household. If you can, stay with those in your household.” If you choose to travel, he said to “do what we’ve always been asking throughout the entire experience: Wear a mask, social distance and wash your hands.”

He also advised residents to avoid travel “if you can” and to host virtual gatherings this Thanksgiving in a social media post on Wednesday.

Hancock did not mention his own plans to travel. In his mea culpa, the mayor said he should have.

“I fully acknowledge that I have urged everyone to stay home and avoid unnecessary travel,” he said in a statement. “I have shared how my family cancelled our plans for our traditional multi-household Thanksgiving celebration. What I did not share, but should have, is that my wife and my daughter have been in Mississippi, where my daughter recently took a job. As the holiday approached, I decided it would be safer for me to travel to see them than to have two family members travel back to Denver.”

The news of Hancock’s travels was met with calls of hypocrisy on Twitter. The mayor said he recognized that many people were “disappointed” by his decision.

“As a public official, whose conduct is rightly scrutinized for the message it sends to others, I apologize to the residents of Denver who see my decision as conflicting with the guidance to stay at home for all but essential travel,” he said. “I made my decision as a husband and father, and for those who are angry and disappointed, I humbly ask you to forgive decisions that are borne of my heart and not my head.”

PHOTO: Denver Mayor Michael Hancock listens as Colorado Rep. Alec Garnett, D-Denver, makes a point during a news conference about the rapid increase in coronavirus cases in the state Tuesday, Nov. 17, 2020, in Denver.

Denver County has seen a surge in COVID-19 cases, with the seven-day moving average of new cases reaching a peak of 728 on Nov. 21, county data shows. The county is in the state’s “level red” risk category, indicating a 14-day average positivity rate of between 10% and 15%.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has advised people to spend the holiday at home as the number of COVID-19 cases spike.

Colorado Gov. Jared Polis has also urged residents

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