Tag: posed

Indiana man posed as US marshal to con thousands from Tennessee hotel

Sometimes getting a quick deal can be costly in the long run.

An Indiana man pleaded guilty to impersonating a law enforcement officer after prosecutors said he had repeatedly claimed to be a U.S. Marshal in order to get a hotel discount, the Knoxville News Sentinel reported.

Anthony Taylor tricked a Pigeon Forge, Tennessee, hotel into giving him discounts totaling thousands of dollars during at least 10 trips over five years, according to the report, which cited court records.

An Indiana man pleaded guilty to impersonating a law enforcement officer after prosecutors said he had repeatedly claimed to be a U.S. Marshal in order to get a hotel discount. (Google Maps)

An Indiana man pleaded guilty to impersonating a law enforcement officer after prosecutors said he had repeatedly claimed to be a U.S. Marshal in order to get a hotel discount. (Google Maps)

WOMAN DEMANDS FREE CHICK-FIL-A AFTER CLAIMING SHE IS AN FBI AGENT, GETS ARRESTED

Taylor would pay the hotel in cash and flash a badge to get a discount. On more than one occasion he even told the clerk “to wash her hands after handling the money as it was confiscated drug money he had received as bonuses for ‘busts,’” prosecutors wrote in court records, per the News Sentinel.

However, staff at the hotel eventually got suspicious. When Taylor made a reservation to stay at the hotel again in April of 2019, a manager checked with the U.S. Marshals Service to verify Taylor’s employment, according to the report.

The man tricked a hotel into giving him discounts totaling thousands of dollars during at least 10 trips over five years. (SpringHill Suites)

The man tricked a hotel into giving him discounts totaling thousands of dollars during at least 10 trips over five years. (SpringHill Suites)

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When Taylor and his wife arrived for their visit, two Marshals in plainclothes were waiting for him in the lobby and pulled him aside, according to the report. They asked Taylor if he’d been telling hotel workers that he was a deputy U.S. Marshal, and he admitted he “was doing it to get the government discount.”

Taylor agreed to a plea deal in September, according to the report. Sentencing hasn’t been scheduled yet.

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He’s not the only one to get in trouble lately for allegedly impersonating a federal law enforcement officer.

Police in Dallas, Georgia, arrested a woman earlier this month after she claimed to be an FBI agent in an attempt to get free food from a Chick-fil-A, The Polk County Standard Journal reported.

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How FBI agents posed as Cincinnati hotel developers to catch suspects in 2 Ohio bribery scandals

COLUMBUS – Columbus lobbyist Neil Clark didn’t realize – while chatting with hotel developer clients after a Reds game – that he was talking with undercover FBI agents working to uncover two bribery schemes. 

Bribery case explained: What you need to know about Larry Householder, FirstEnergy, HB6

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The first was against Cincinnati City Councilman Jeff Pastor, a Republican, who was arrested Tuesday. He is accused of accepting $55,000 in bribes in exchange for his vote on development projects. Pastor pleaded not guilty to charges Tuesday afternoon.

The second was against Clark, former Ohio House Speaker Larry Householder, a Republican, and three others. They are accused of orchestrating a nearly $61 million bribery scheme to seize control of the Ohio House, pass a more than $1 billion bailout for nuclear plants and defend those subsidies against a ballot initiative. 

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Those two apparently unconnected, widespread bribery investigations converged in Cincinnati.

Two agents posed as Cincinnati hotel developers with Monarch Development Inc. and offered bribes to Pastor between August 2018 and February 2019. 

One of the projects at the center of the Pastor investigation was 435 Elm St., the former Convention Place Mall that had become an eyesore. The FBI asked former Cincinnati Bengal Chinedum Ndukwe, whose company is trying to develop the former mall site, for help.

In January 2019, Clark met with Ndukwe and the two hotel developers, introduced as Brian Bennett and Rob Miller, in Clark’s Columbus office. Clark told The Enquirer that the men said they had the votes on Cincinnati Council for a boutique hotel at 435 Elm St. and wanted to offer sports betting there. 

Sports betting isn’t yet legal in Ohio, but lawmakers are considering legislation to allow it. The key debate remains where should it be permitted and who should regulate it.

Clark now believes his hotel developer clients were actually FBI agents or informants. Federal documents in the Pastor case back that up. At least one “undercover law enforcement agent” posed as a business partner to Ndukwe and another, unidentified developer, according to Pastor’s indictment. 

In June 2019, Clark and his clients watched a Reds-Houston Astros game in Cincinnati and then met politicians at the penthouse of 580 Walnut St. Clark said he met city council members there but wasn’t sure if Pastor was one of them. 

Clark met with his clients in Nashville in July 2019 and at a suburban Columbus dinner club in September 2019. Conversations from those meetings later appeared in the federal indictment against him, Householder and three allies. Clark, Householder and lobbyist and former Ohio Republican Party chairman Matt Borges pleaded not guilty to racketeering charges.



a man wearing a suit and tie standing in front of a crowd: Ohio House Speaker Larry Householder walks out of U.S. District Court after charges that he participated in a racketeering conspiracy in Columbus, Ohio on July 21, 2020. Ohio House Speaker Larry Householder and four colleagues were arrested by federal officials Tuesday as part of a bribery investigation involving the state’s $1 billion nuclear plant bailout and Householder’s maneuverings to secure support to lead the legislative chamber. [Kyle Robertson/Dispatch]


© Kyle Robertson, Kyle Robertson
Ohio House Speaker Larry Householder walks out of U.S. District Court after charges that he participated in a racketeering conspiracy in Columbus, Ohio on July 21, 2020. Ohio House Speaker Larry Householder and four colleagues were arrested

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How FBI agents posed as Cincinnati hotel developers to catch Ohio bribery suspects

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Ohio House Speaker Larry Householder and four alleged co-conspirators were arrested and charged in a racketeering and bribery case.

Cincinnati Enquirer

COLUMBUS – Columbus lobbyist Neil Clark didn’t realize – while chatting with hotel developer clients after a Reds game – that he was talking with undercover FBI agents working to uncover two bribery schemes. 

The first was against Cincinnati City Councilman Jeff Pastor, a Republican, who was arrested Tuesday. He is accused of accepting $55,000 in bribes in exchange for his vote on development projects. Pastor pleaded not guilty to charges Tuesday afternoon.

The second was against Clark, former Ohio House Speaker Larry Householder, a Republican, and three others. They are accused of orchestrating a nearly $61 million bribery scheme to seize control of the Ohio House, pass a more than $1 billion bailout for nuclear plants and defend those subsidies against a ballot initiative. 

Ohio House Speaker Larry Householder is accused of racketeering. The FBI posed as Cincinnati hotel developers to assist in the arrest of Householder and Cincinnati Councilman Jeff Pastor in two separate cases. (Photo: Kyle Robertson, Kyle Robertson)

Those two apparently unconnected, widespread bribery investigations converged in Cincinnati.

Two agents posed as Cincinnati hotel developers with Monarch Development Inc. and offered bribes to Pastor between August 2018 and February 2019. 

One of the projects at the center of the Pastor investigation was 435 Elm St., the former Convention Place Mall that had become an eyesore. The FBI asked former Cincinnati Bengal Chinedum Ndukwe, whose company is trying to develop the former mall site, for help.

In January 2019, Clark met with Ndukwe and the two hotel developers, introduced as Brian Bennett and Rob Miller, in Clark’s Columbus office. Clark told The Enquirer that the men said they had the votes on Cincinnati Council for a boutique hotel at 435 Elm St. and wanted to offer sports betting there. 

Sports betting isn’t yet legal in Ohio, but lawmakers are considering legislation to allow it. The key debate remains where should it be permitted and who should regulate it.

Clark now believes his hotel developer clients were actually FBI agents or informants. Federal documents in the Pastor case back that up. At least one “undercover law enforcement agent” posed as a business partner to Ndukwe and another, unidentified developer, according to Pastor’s indictment. 

In June 2019, Clark and his clients watched a Reds-Houston Astros game in Cincinnati and then met politicians at the penthouse of 580 Walnut St. Clark said he met city council members there but wasn’t sure if Pastor was one of them. 

Clark met with his clients in Nashville in July 2019 and at a suburban Columbus dinner club in September 2019. Conversations from those meetings later appeared in the federal indictment against him, Householder and three allies. Clark, Householder and lobbyist and former Ohio Republican Party chairman Matt Borges pleaded not guilty to racketeering charges.

Clark, at the dinner, said that defending the nuclear bailout would shore up Householder’s power going forward:

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