Tag: Podcast

Wildlife, conservation, recreation among topics of new Colorado Outdoors podcast | Cheyenne Edition

For any outdoor-centric Coloradan, there’s a new podcast to consider.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife at the end of October launched Colorado Outdoors, audio segments “designed to share the work taking place in the agency,” according to a news release.

Topics will include “parks, wildlife, trails, outdoor recreation, safety, natural resources, research, biology, energy and more.” The podcast “will also give the agency a communication tool to share information on hot and pressing topics,” according to the release.

Colorado Outdoors launched with a 37-minute interview with Dan Prenzlow, director of the government enterprise funded by sporting licenses, park passes and other fees.

The balance between conservation and recreation has “really hit a crescendo in the last five years,” Prenzlow said, alluding to record crowding at parks and the state’s ever-rising population. He said CPW is “working with the governor’s office” to come up with a “balancing” plan.

“Everybody that makes a decision — every county, every city, the state and federal government — anytime you approve something or disapprove something, you’re adding to that complexity,” Prenzlow said. “Long story short, we’re gonna work to balance that.”

Another Colorado Outdoors episode focuses on Fishers Peak, the 42nd state park that recently opened. The park’s manager, Crystal Dreiling, said she expects it to take two years to finalize a master plan for developing the 19,200-acre preserve.

She described the “raw and rugged” nature of the park. “Hopefully we can keep it that way in a sense,” she said.

Colorado Outdoors is available wherever you stream podcasts, including Spotify, Apple/iTunes, Google and Amazon.

Contact the writer: [email protected]

Source Article

Continue reading

Wildlife, conservation, recreation among topics of new Colorado Outdoors podcast | Thetribune

For any outdoor-centric Coloradan, there’s a new podcast to consider.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife at the end of October launched Colorado Outdoors, audio segments “designed to share the work taking place in the agency,” according to a news release.

Topics will include “parks, wildlife, trails, outdoor recreation, safety, natural resources, research, biology, energy and more.” The podcast “will also give the agency a communication tool to share information on hot and pressing topics,” according to the release.

Colorado Outdoors launched with a 37-minute interview with Dan Prenzlow, director of the government enterprise funded by sporting licenses, park passes and other fees.

The balance between conservation and recreation has “really hit a crescendo in the last five years,” Prenzlow said, alluding to record crowding at parks and the state’s ever-rising population. He said CPW is “working with the governor’s office” to come up with a “balancing” plan.

“Everybody that makes a decision — every county, every city, the state and federal government — anytime you approve something or disapprove something, you’re adding to that complexity,” Prenzlow said. “Long story short, we’re gonna work to balance that.”

Another Colorado Outdoors episode focuses on Fishers Peak, the 42nd state park that recently opened on a limited basis. The park’s manager, Crystal Dreiling, said she expects it to take two years to finalize a master plan, a guide for developing the 19,200-acre preserve.

She described the “raw and rugged” nature of the park. “Hopefully we can keep it that way in a sense,” she said.

Colorado Outdoors is available wherever you stream podcasts, including Spotify, Apple/iTunes, Google and Amazon.

Contact the writer: [email protected]

Source Article

Continue reading

Wildlife, conservation, recreation among topics of new Colorado Outdoors podcast | Pikes Peak Courier

For any outdoor-centric Coloradan, there’s a new podcast to consider.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife at the end of October launched Colorado Outdoors, audio segments “designed to share the work taking place in the agency,” according to a news release.

Topics will include “parks, wildlife, trails, outdoor recreation, safety, natural resources, research, biology, energy and more.” The podcast “will also give the agency a communication tool to share information on hot and pressing topics,” according to the release.

Colorado Outdoors launched with a 37-minute interview with Dan Prenzlow, director of the government enterprise funded by sporting licenses, park passes and other fees.

The balance between conservation and recreation has “really hit a crescendo in the last five years,” Prenzlow said, alluding to record crowding at parks and the state’s ever-rising population. He said CPW is “working with the governor’s office” to come up with a “balancing” plan.

“Everybody that makes a decision — every county, every city, the state and federal government — anytime you approve something or disapprove something, you’re adding to that complexity,” Prenzlow said. “Long story short, we’re gonna work to balance that.”

Another Colorado Outdoors episode focuses on Fishers Peak, the 42nd state park that recently opened on a limited basis. The park’s manager, Crystal Dreiling, said she expects it to take two years to finalize a master plan, a guide for developing the 19,200-acre preserve.

She described the “raw and rugged” nature of the park. “Hopefully we can keep it that way in a sense,” she said.

Colorado Outdoors is available wherever you stream podcasts, including Spotify, Apple/iTunes, Google and Amazon.

Contact the writer: [email protected]

Source Article

Continue reading

How to Make Every Day Off Feel Like a Real Vacation: Women Who Travel Podcast

NC: I like the pun there of drawing a line, literally and metaphorically. Yeah, it’s actually something that has been tricky this year, working from home, because I actually rent a studio and work outside of where I live and I’ve been doing that for the past eight years. So it is a bit like a step backwards working from home again. It reminds me of when I just graduated from uni and it was very much like starting out, working in my bedroom, a desk at the end of my bed, everything in very close quarters. So in a way, it’s felt a bit regressive going back to that during lockdown. So it’s been a bit of an adjustment trying to still feel that level of professionalism, but also trying to give myself a bit of a break and taking that opportunity to actually slow down a bit and maybe not work at such a high performing rate that I often feel I should be working at.

And I guess to help draw some line or make some boundary, I try to build as much of a routine as I can if I am working from home. So that means getting up, making sure I have a decent breakfast, have a cup of coffee or a cup of tea, doing those little rituals and trying to do that every day so that I’m almost programming myself into, “Okay, I’m getting a rhythm here. I’m getting into my work mode,” and then work begins late morning.

I think it is really, really important to have a designated work space in your home if you’re working from home, a decent chair that’s good for your back, and just somewhere where you can physically be and to just switch like that into work mode as much as possible. But also, I think it’s really important to give yourself a bit of a break and to be okay with the fact that you’re not in your usual professional environment. Therefore, you’re not going to feel as professional as you would normally. In the same way that doing video calls, people can actually see your home rather than your studio or your office, you are opening up another bit of your world. And I think there’s something very democratic about what’s been going on in that everyone’s been in this situation, everyone can see each other’s messy kitchens or living rooms, or screaming toddlers, or dogs barking in the background, or piles of crap behind them like I’ve got now.

But I think at the same time, it’s okay not to be able to draw that line that clearly. And I think it’s quite good to just give yourself a bit of a break at the moment, because these aren’t usual circumstances.

And also, try and get outside, even just for 10 minutes. Pop into the garden or go for a walk, that just helped so much because I think I took for granted

Continue reading

Wildlife, conservation, recreation among topics of new Colorado Outdoors podcast | Lifestyle

For any outdoor-centric Coloradan, there’s a new podcast to consider.

Colorado Parks and Wildlife at the end of October launched Colorado Outdoors, audio segments “designed to share the work taking place in the agency,” according to a news release.

Topics will include “parks, wildlife, trails, outdoor recreation, safety, natural resources, research, biology, energy and more.” The podcast “will also give the agency a communication tool to share information on hot and pressing topics,” according to the release.

Colorado Outdoors launched with a 37-minute interview with Dan Prenzlow, director of the government enterprise funded by sporting licenses, park passes and other fees.

The balance between conservation and recreation has “really hit a crescendo in the last five years,” Prenzlow said, alluding to record crowding at parks and the state’s ever-rising population. He said CPW is “working with the governor’s office” to come up with a “balancing” plan.

“Everybody that makes a decision — every county, every city, the state and federal government — anytime you approve something or disapprove something, you’re adding to that complexity,” Prenzlow said. “Long story short, we’re gonna work to balance that.”

Another Colorado Outdoors episode focuses on Fishers Peak, the 42nd state park now open on a limited basis. The park’s manager, Crystal Dreiling, said she expects it to take two years to finalize a master plan, a guide for developing the 19,200-acre preserve.

She described the “raw and rugged” nature of the park. “Hopefully we can keep it that way in a sense,” she said.

Colorado Outdoors is available wherever you stream podcasts, including Spotify, Apple/iTunes, Google and Amazon.

Source Article

Continue reading

Why You Really Need to Take All of Your Vacation Days: Women Who Travel Podcast

We say it a lot over here at Traveler: Americans are really bad at taking vacation. So much so that in 2017, we left 705 million vacation days on the table, the U.S. Travel Association reported. Think of all the walking tours, island naps, and life-changing meals that were missed! And while we always urge you to take all of your days—be they five or 25—we don’t always practice what we preach, either. One of us (cough, Meredith) left nearly half of her vacation days unused during her first year at Traveler, for fear of being gone from work too much.

Thankfully, we’ve since learned the error of our ways—but we could all use the reminder that we’re actually devaluing our salary by leaving those days behind. (Especially given women are already earning about 19.5 percent less than our male counterparts, according to the Institute for Women’s Policy Research.) We tapped the keeper of our vacation days, Traveler‘s director of editorial operations Paulie Dibner, and contributor Cassie Shortsleeve to chat about vacation guilt, how to ask for time off, what to do when you have unlimited vacation, and what to actually do when you get it.

Before we got into the studio, we put out a question in our Women Who Travel Facebook group and on our Instagrams: do you, dear listeners, take all of your vacation days? We got a mountain of responses, and decided to run a few of them below. Which side do you stand on? Let us know by tweeting @ohheytheremere and @LaleArikoglu to share your thoughts.

Yes, of course I take them all.

“I do use all of mine and feel comfortable using it. I make it clear to my supervisor that my travels are very important to me and I plan far enough in advance and also when others may not be traveling (during school time) to try to help manage coverage.” –Danielle L.

“I just started working but I’ve always been passionate about travel so I make sure I use my vacation days (or other type of leave). I’m really lucky that I work in a position where I can get time off instead of overtime pay. I took two weeks over Christmas and New Years and only had to take three vacation days (also three holidays). I’m pretty much the only person who uses all their leave in my office but my first supervisor told me that no one is too important to take time off. If you died in a freak accident, your job would still get done somehow.” – Sierra L.

“I use up every last bit of vacation time I can!! My work is very strict on you having no unpaid time off, which really sucks, so it’s important that I travel every time I use my vacation time. I feel guilty when I take off time that somebody else in my department also wants, [but I also] feel guilty when I’m

Continue reading