Tag: Plan

Plan calls for three apartment buildings and hotel at Moorestown Mall

MOORESTOWN – Three apartment buildings and a hotel could be developed at Moorestown Mall under a proposed agreement between the township and the shopping center’s owner.

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The four-story apartment buildings would hold up to 1,065 homes, with 213 units to be affordable housing, according to a court filing.

The buildings would rise, along with a 112,000-square-foot hotel, in a three-phase development at the 84-acre mall property, the filing says.

The first phase calls for a 375-unit apartment building in a parking lot between Boscov’s and Nixon Drive, according to a concept plan that accompanies the proposed order. The 412,500-square-foot building would hold 75 affordable homes and a parking structure.



diagram: A concept plan for Moorestown Mall's redevelopment shows an apartment building, left, between Boscov's and Nixon Drive. A hotel would rise off Lenola Road.


© Photo provided
A concept plan for Moorestown Mall’s redevelopment shows an apartment building, left, between Boscov’s and Nixon Drive. A hotel would rise off Lenola Road.

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The initial phase also envisions the hotel in a parking lot off Lenola Road, near the rear of the shopping center.

Those projects would require no demolition of the mall, according to the concept plan.

But the second phase would put a 345-unit apartment building on an area that includes the former Lord + Taylor department store and an adjacent parking lot.

The third phase calls for development of a similar building at a site that includes the former Sears store and a parking lot off Route 38.

The plans are outlined in a proposed consent order filed Friday before Superior Court Judge Paula Dow in Mount Holly.

The proposal was reached after mediation between the township, mall owner PREIT and Fair Share Housing Center, a Cherry Hill-based nonprofit that advocates for low-income residents.

Dow ordered the talks earlier this year after PREIT objected to a township plan to provide affordable housing there.



a tree in front of a building: The former Lord + Taylor store at Moorestown Mall would make way for an apartment building under a proposed agreement to bring affordable housing to the shopping center.


© Jim Walsh, Courier-Post
The former Lord + Taylor store at Moorestown Mall would make way for an apartment building under a proposed agreement to bring affordable housing to the shopping center.

A proposed zoning overlay that received initial approval from township council in January would have required the mall’s demolition, according to PREIT.

The proposed agreement would “address a significant portion of the township’s ‘unmet need’ for affordable housing,” according to the filing.

It says the apartment buildings in the second and third phases would hold a total of 137 affordable units. Those buildings “may or may not” have parking structures.

“Phase One can stand on its own without the need for future development of Phase Two and Three,” it notes.

It adds the later phases are “more conceptual at this point” and “shall proceed at developer’s sole discretion.”

The proposed “affordable housing settlement agreement” also says the parties have recognized “at least initially, the existing portion of the mall identified for Phase Three … may be

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Norfolk to hold 2 virtual public input meetings on future of Parks and Recreation Master Plan

NORFOLK, Va. (WAVY) – City officials announced they will be holding two virtual public input meetings to get feedback from the community on updating the Parks and Recreation Master Plan.

The Zoom meetings will be held Wednesday, Dec. 9, from 6 p.m. until 7 p.m. and then again Thursday, Dec. 10, from 6 p.m. until 7 p.m. Click the respective date and time to register for a spot. The meetings will include live polling, Q&A, and public comment collection.

“Diverse and equitable opportunities for recreation and vibrant parks and facilities are essential to our thriving community,” said Mayor Kenneth Cooper Alexander, Ph.D. “Norfolk is an innovative community, as we continue to address the COVID-19 pandemic and other challenges, this refresh and update of the Parks & Recreation Master Plan will help better position our city as the premier destination for families and businesses for years to come.”

The public’s input will help with future recreational, programming, environmental, and maintenance needs, as well as establish priorities for facility improvements, future park development, and land acquisitions.

The city hired PROS Consulting, Inc. — a national leader in parks and recreation consulting. Principal Neelay Bhatt will serve as the project lead. Bhatt states, “Norfolk RPOS is a top-notch agency, selected as a National Gold Medal Finalist in 2019. Having worked with parks and recreation agencies nationwide, I have no hesitation positioning RPOS staff and team with the best of the agencies across the country. With this plan, we will implement industry trends and exceed the needs of the growing Norfolk community.”

The consulting team provided an ADA-accessible, multilingual crowdsourcing website to guide this project. “This virtual engagement is critical in the current times to ensure everyone is able to participate in the planning process in an inclusive manner. This website provides all project findings and allows residents to participate in the virtual public meetings. Survey results and recordings of the virtual meetings will be available on the site,” said Bhatt.

“During these meetings, we will introduce the master plan and engage the community through creative online mediums designed to boost public input. We look forward to the Norfolk community and key stakeholders participating to help guide our efforts to improve and redefine Norfolk’s park system, and plan for future parks and recreation services, including prioritizing projects, maintenance, policy, and funding,” said RPOS Director Darrell R. Crittendon.

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Over half of Americans still plan Thanksgiving travel amid COVID concerns, report says

As health officials warn of the risks of Thanksgiving travel, more than half of Americans still plan to venture away from home, according to a new survey.

The website Tripadvisor says 56% of people intend to take trips for the holiday this year, despite the coronavirus pandemic, a report released last week shows.

“The way in which consumers travel, however, will look very different from past years,” Christopher Hsi, consumer market research lead analyst for Tripadvisor, said in a news release. “This year, we can expect shorter trips with smaller groups of people for more intimate, close knit gatherings.”

The number of U.S. residents planning to go on Thanksgiving trips is down 14% compared to last year, and travelers are expected to steer clear of big cities, results show. Also, road tripping is the most popular option, with about three-fourths of people in the survey saying they plan to get to their destinations by car.

AAA also expects most travelers to take road trips, saying the mode of transportation allows families to make flexible plans.

“The wait-and-see travel trend continues to impact final travel decisions, especially for the Thanksgiving holiday,” Paula Twidale, senior vice president of AAA Travel, said last week in a news release.

The travel company estimated in mid-October that 50 million people would pack their bags this Thanksgiving, a 10% drop from last year. But there could be even fewer travelers as coronavirus cases climb and officials share travel warnings and restrictions, according to AAA.

The predictions come as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says staying home offers the best protection against COVID-19. Sharing an intimate Thanksgiving dinner with people you live with is among the activities that carry the lowest risk for transmitting the disease, while gathering with people from outside your household has a higher risk, according to health officials.

For those who decide to travel, it’s best to wait at least 14 days after potential exposure to the coronavirus, the CDC says.

While on the trip, experts recommend everyone wash their hands, practice social distancing and wear a face mask at transit centers. For car rides, AAA suggests bringing food to avoid stops.

To come up with its travel predictions, AAA says it teamed up with IHS Markit to study coronavirus-related rules, travel prices, jobs and other factors.

For its survey, Tripadvisor says it collected responses from roughly 400 people between Oct. 16-20, a company spokesperson told Fox Business.

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Officials approve plan for managing recreation on Madison River | News

Montana officials amended and approved new regulations intended to reduce crowding on the Madison River at a virtual meeting Wednesday, wrapping up a three-year long process.

The Montana Fish and Wildlife Commission spent six hours Wednesday hearing public comments and wrangling with proposed rules to limit commercial use on stretches of the Madison River. They voted unanimously to pass a version of the regulations drafted by Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks officials that will go into place in three parts.

The first part is about gathering data on noncommercial use and setting up a working group for the river. The second would put in place a cap on commercial use and the third would test restricting certain uses on certain days.

“Madison River recreation management is one of those issues where developing a solution that makes everyone happy is close to impossible,” said Eileen Ryce, FWP’s fisheries chief. “In developing a recommendation, our goal was to try and find some middle ground or a moderate approach that addresses the major concerns raised in public comment.”

Now that the regulations have passed the commission, they will go to the secretary of state’s office for filing, according to Becky Dockter, chief legal counsel for FWP. Commissioners said the rules would likely be filed by Dec. 15 and go into effect on Christmas Day.

FWP already drafted a series of rules reflecting recommendations found in petitions from the Fishing Outfitters Association of Montana (FOAM) and a coalition of the George Grant Chapter of Trout Unlimited, the Anaconda Sportsmen Association and the Skyline Sportsmen Association. The department collected more than 700 public comments on those proposals, then drafted its own set of recommendations.

To give FWP staff time to evaluate the effectiveness of the new rules, the approved regulations will be adopted in phases, according to Ryce. Each phase will be evaluated and regulations will receive a full review every five years.

In 2021, the commission plans to appoint a working group responsible for regulating commercial and non-commercial river users. The working group is expected to include a commissioner and a member of the Bureau of Land Management.

Additionally, in 2021, all non-commercial river users will have to report their trips to FWP officials through a system devised by the department. The department suggested it may track non-commercial recreation via sign-in boxes, rather than mandatory stamps, as petitioners had originally proposed. Trail cameras are also being considered. The data collected from the project will help inform future non-commercial river use management.

In 2022, FWP plans to set the number of guided trips allocated to commercial river users at 2019 or 2020 levels, choosing whichever is higher for the outfitter. The new working group will continue to develop and monitor caps on the number of guided trips allocated to outfitters.

Further caps would be enforced based on levels recommended by the working group and approved by the commission. Information gathered from the non-commercial reporting requirements will allow the department to draft any regulations restricting such

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Here’s what the CDC and Massachusetts colleges are saying about students who plan to travel for Thanksgiving

With COVID-19 cases surging across the country and Thanksgiving approaching, officials with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are urging those who plan to travel to take precautions, and Massachusetts colleges are issuing their own guidance for students.

The safest way to celebrate this year is to hold virtual gatherings or spend it with people you live with, officials say. If college students decide to travel home to spend Thanksgiving with their families, it can pose varying levels of risk.

College students returning home for Thanksgiving should be considered part of a separate household, the CDC says, and there are a number of factors that contribute to the risk of spreading COVID-19 at an in-person gathering with people from different households. Among the considerations that should be weighed are the following:

  • Levels of COVID-19 where the gathering is taking place and levels of COVID-19 at the college or community the student is coming from
  • The potential for exposure to the virus in airports, bus stations, train stations, and gas stations
  • Indoor gatherings with poor ventilation pose greater risk than outdoor gatherings
  • Events that last longer pose greater risk than shorter events
  • Gatherings with more people pose more risk than gatherings with fewer people
  • The behavior of people who are attending before the gathering and during the gathering. People who social distance, wash their hands often, and wear masks pose less of a risk than those who don’t

Colleges in Massachusetts are also issuing their own advice and requirements for students who decide to travel for Thanksgiving and then return to campus to complete the semester.

Boston University is suggesting students stay on campus for Thanksgiving and host “Friendsgivings.” If they travel home, they should finish out the semester remotely, according to BU Today, the university’s online publication.

For BU students who opt to travel home and then return to campus, they’ll need to isolate for a week and test negative for COVID-19 three times before they can leave their rooms, the post said.

“This means remaining in your room, attending courses remotely, and exiting the building only for medical appointments or meals,” Dean of Students Kenneth Elmore wrote in an email to students who have indicated they plan to go home for Thanksgiving and return to campus after, according to BU Today. “Violations of this advisory may result in disciplinary action up to and including suspension.”

Northeastern University is also asking students who travel for Thanksgiving to consider finishing the semester remotely, according to an email sent to students and staff.

For students who decide to return to campus, they will need to take a COVID-19 test and quarantine. Four days after they return, they’ll take another test. They can return to in-person classes and other activities after that test comes back negative, the email says.


Amanda Kaufman can be reached at [email protected] Follow her on Twitter @amandakauf1.

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Woodhaven residents encouraged to review five-year recreation plan before final draft to council | News

The newly proposed five-year Woodhaven Parks and Recreation master plan is now available for public review.

Residents are able to look over the plan and make their comments on it until at least the end of the month.

According to city officials, in order to achieve the overall goal of the plan, the process must be customer driven and oriented.

Input from residents, community leaders, school supporters, business owners and volunteers was being sought and integrated into the plan representing the priorities of the community.

Officials said with strong working relationships, partnerships and collaborations, the use of community resources will be maximized for the benefit of all residents.

Prior to making the final submission to the City Council for its consideration and then approval, plans call for the Recreation Commission to further consider and discuss the additional public input during the Dec. 21, virtual meeting.

Residents recently completed a survey asking for thoughts on various recreational activities offered in the city.

The responses from the survey and additional input helped formulate a vision for the city in terms of other programs, services and facilities.

The survey was designed to show officials how the services offered are working and what things would be attractive for the future.

It was put together to gauge opinions, interests and beliefs about the city’s parks and recreation department.

The input helped formulate a vision for the city in terms of other programs, services and facilities moving forward.

Some of the questions focused on improving the park system, the operation and maintenance of parks and facilities, city sponsored events, underserved recreational needs and prioritizing the appeal of various activities.

Recreation has been a focus for Mayor Patricia Odette over the past several years.

Among other things, she has brought playground area amenities, a dog park, Splash Pad, fitness trails, renovated Safety Town buildings, added a skate park and more to the city.

A draft of the proposed master plan is available on the city’s website at Woodhavenmi.org.

All comments, concerns and suggestions can be shared in writing via email at [email protected] or mailed to the Woodhaven Parks and Recreation Department, 23101 Hall Road, Woodhaven, MI 48183.

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, the city will provide necessary reasonable auxiliary aids and services to individuals with disabilities.

For additional information, contact the recreation department at 734-675-4926.

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COVID travel risk tool can help you plan holiday travel

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Holidays are usually for gatherings but many get-togethers are complicated or canceled because of COVID-19.

USA TODAY

It won’t be easy for Americans to decide whom to welcome into their homes or visit during the holiday season as the U.S. breaks records for new cases of the novel coronavirus.

A number of cities and states have tried to limit residents’ activities in an effort to slow the spread of COVID-19. That includes Chicago, where Mayor Lori Lightfoot issued a 30-day stay-at-home advisory and limiting gatherings to 10 people. Other cities have imposed curfews.

The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention maintains that the best way to protect yourself and others from COVID-19 is to stay at home.

Travelers should check for restrictions in the state, city, tribe or territory they are visiting. The CDC has a list of resources and links on its website to help find applicable health departments. 

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Health experts are warning against “pandemic fatigue” and are encouraging people to stay socially distanced, wear masks and get tested for the coronavirus.

For those who are considering traveling to see friends and family as 2020 comes to a close, an interactive map can help inform your decision whether you feel safe going to an event or gathering in any given location, reports The Arizona Republic, which is part of the USA TODAY Network.

What is the COVID-19 Risk Assessment Planning Tool?

Researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology, the Applied Bioinformatics Laboratory and Stanford University have created the COVID-19 Risk Assessment Planning Tool, which “shows the risk level of attending an event, given the event size and location.”

The tool, which is updated daily, can be found at https://covid19risk.biosci.gatech.edu.

The holidays are coming: Should you skip even small family gatherings? What experts say.

“To provide real-time, geolocalized risk information, we developed an interactive online dashboard that estimates the risk that at least one individual with SARS-CoV-2 is present in gatherings of different sizes in the United States,” the researchers wrote in a peer-reviewed Nature Human Behaviour article.

“Risk assessment and tolerance varies considerably between individuals,” the researchers acknowledge. “The intention of the tool is to promote informed behaviour by providing a quantity analogous to other likelihoods that may be familiar to users (for example, weather forecasts).”

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology, the Applied Bioinformatics Laboratory and Stanford University have created the COVID-19 Event Risk Assessment Planning Tool, which “shows the risk level of attending an event, given the event size and location.” (Photo: COVID-19 Event Risk Assessment Planning Tool)

How does the risk assessment tool work?

The event risk assessment planning tool doesn’t assume that the number of reported cases indicates the actual spread of the coronavirus across the globe.

To account for the lack of knowledge of the true number of coronavirus cases, the user can select an ascertainment bias of 5 or 10. Selecting a bias of 10 would alter the data to assume that

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COVID travel risk tool can help you plan (or skip) holiday travel

CLOSE

Holidays are usually for gatherings but many get-togethers are complicated or canceled because of COVID-19.

USA TODAY

It won’t be easy for Americans to decide whom to welcome into their homes or visit during the holiday season as the U.S. breaks records for new cases of the novel coronavirus.

A number of cities and states have tried to limit residents’ activities in an effort to slow the spread of COVID-19. This includes Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot issuing a 30-day stay-at-home advisory and limiting gatherings to 10 people. Other cities have imposed curfews.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention maintains that the best way to protect yourself and others from COVID-19 is to stay at home.

Travelers should check for restrictions in the state, city, tribe or territory they are visiting. The CDC has a list of resources and links on its website to help find applicable health departments. 

Autoplay

Show Thumbnails

Show Captions

Last SlideNext Slide

Health experts are warning against “pandemic fatigue,” encouraging people to stay socially distanced, wear masks and get tested for COVID-19.

For those who are considering traveling to see friends and family as 2020 comes to a close, there is an interactive map that can help inform your decision whether you feel safe going to an event or gathering in any given location, reports The Arizona Republic, which is part of the USA TODAY Network.

What is the COVID-19 Risk Assessment Planning Tool?

Researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology, the Applied Bioinformatics Laboratory and Stanford University have created the COVID-19 Risk Assessment Planning Tool, which “shows the risk level of attending an event, given the event size and location.”

The tool, which is updated daily, can be found at https://covid19risk.biosci.gatech.edu.

The holidays are coming: Should you skip even small family gatherings? What experts say.

“To provide real-time, geolocalized risk information, we developed an interactive online dashboard that estimates the risk that at least one individual with SARS-CoV-2 is present in gatherings of different sizes in the United States,” the researchers wrote in a peer-reviewed Nature Human Behaviour article.

“Risk assessment and tolerance varies considerably between individuals,” the researchers acknowledge. “The intention of the tool is to promote informed behaviour by providing a quantity analogous to other likelihoods that may be familiar to users (for example, weather forecasts).”

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology, the Applied Bioinformatics Laboratory and Stanford University have created the COVID-19 Event Risk Assessment Planning Tool, which “shows the risk level of attending an event, given the event size and location.” (Photo: COVID-19 Event Risk Assessment Planning Tool)

How does the risk assessment tool work?

The event risk assessment planning tool doesn’t assume that the number of reported cases is indicative of the actual spread of the coronavirus across the globe.

To account for the lack of knowledge of the true number of coronavirus cases, the user can select an ascertainment bias of five or 10. Selecting a bias of 10 would alter the data to assume that

Continue reading

Norwell seeks input at forum for Open Space and Recreation Plan

Community Content
 |  Wicked Local

The town of Norwell is updating its Open Space and Recreation Plan and will seek the continued participation of residents in the final OSRP virtual public forum from 6 to 7:30 p.m. Nov. 19.

The 2020 OSRP update will set the goals and priorities that will guide the town’s actions in maintaining, protecting and improving its open spaces, parks and recreational resources and make the town eligible for state funds to acquire and improve conservation and recreation land.

Hundreds of residents have made contributions to the 2020 OSRP update by completing the town wide survey and attending the first virtual public forum in October. A working draft of the 2020 Open Space and Recreation Plan will be posted on the project website at https://bit.ly/3eSETfj.

The forum will consist of a presentation, interactive exercises and small group discussions. Live virtual attendance and participation through Zoom is strongly encouraged. Participants must RSVP in advance at https://bit.ly/36hhbFn. Participants will receive a link that they can use to join the forum.

Participants that are unable to attend the meeting with a computer, tablet or smartphone through Zoom can also call in to the forum with the number 646 876 9923. The ID number is 955 3114 5040. The passcode is 024147.

To learn more about the Open Space and Recreation Plan process, visit https://bit.ly/301E51f or contact Marynel Wahl, conservation commission chair, at 617-592-5632.

The OSRP Committee is also seeking photographs that highlight the town of Norwell’s existing open space, conservation and recreation areas. These photographs will be considered for inclusion in the final 2020 Open Space and Recreation Plan. To submit any high-resolution photos, email Marynel Wahl at [email protected] Submitters should include their name, contact information and additional details regarding the photo.

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Midvale mayor fights plan to use hotel for homeless winter overflow

MIDVALE — Already faced with Utah’s first heavy snowfall, Salt Lake County homeless officials this week had hoped to finalize details on two facilities to help house the homeless as part of a winter overflow plan.

But then, Midvale Mayor Robert Hale publicly voiced opposition to using a hotel — the La Quinta Inn east of the Midvale Family Family Shelter on 7200 South — as part of that plan.

“What can we do to request a change?” Hale asked during the State Homeless Coordinating Committee meeting on Tuesday. State officials, in response, told him the decision was up to the Salt Lake Valley Coalition to End Homelessness.

The coalition has spent months trying to come up with a solution to bring the homeless camping on the streets out of the cold, after Salt Lake City leaders promised last year’s winter shelter, the Sugar House Temporary Shelter, would be just that — temporary. It shuttered in April.

Since then, the COVID-19 pandemic has further strained Utah’s homeless system, putting pressure on homeless resource centers’ ability to fill their beds to capacity while keeping clients safe and socially distant. Salt Lake County has also executed contracts with other hotels to house homeless who are at “high-risk” to COVID-19.

But Hale, in an interview with the Deseret News on Wednesday, said the small, 6-square-mile city of Midvale can’t take any more impacts from homelessness, already the host of the 300-bed Midvale Family Shelter just across I-15. Another 140 homeless adults housed in the hotel, Hale said, would put too much pressure on Midvale’s already strained police resources.

“It’s not that I dislike the homeless. I feel for them. I love them as a brother,” Hale said, explaining how he and his wife on multiple occasions have helped house and feed homeless individuals under their own roof. “But when the county drops a bombshell on us of putting up to 140 homeless into a motel … it’s going to overwhelm our little city.”

Hale said if that many more homeless individuals are housed in Midvale, “it’s going to bring additional issues that we are not able to provide safety from.” He said that area around the La Quinta, including the nearby Motel 6, is already a “crime hotspot” that “keeps our police very busy.”

Jean Hill, co-chair of the Salt Lake Valley Coalition to End Homelessness, said the Midvale mayor had raised some concerns during a walk-through of the La Quinta a week ago, but she was caught off guard by his public opposition.

“We thought we addressed those concerns,” she said.

Hill said the coalition “carefully reviewed” eight sites in multiple cities using a series of criteria created based on experiences last winter.

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