Tag: Palmetto

Local sections of Palmetto Trail named as National Recreation Trail (copy) | News

from A1

The Swamp Fox and Awendaw passages of the Palmetto Trail have been recognized as the newest additions to the National Recreation Trail Program. The two passages combined will now be known as The Palmetto National Recreation Trail.

A National Recreation Trail is a designated part of America’s National Trails System. Each NRT must demonstrate that it represents its region, supports a diverse community, and is among Americas best trails. This portion of South Carolina’s state-wide Palmetto Trail spans 58.05 miles and is primarily located within the Francis Marion National Forest.

“We are excited to have received the National Recreation Trail designation for the Swamp Fox and Awendaw Trail passages,” said Mary Roe, Executive Director of the Palmetto Trail. “The 58.05 miles of trail has been used by thousands of hikers and mountain bikers enjoying nature walks, bird watching, cross country runs and camping trips. This is a wonderful example of our successful partnership with the Forest Service.”

The USDA Forest Service – Francis Marion & Sumter National Forests’ Supervisor Rick Lint expressed his appreciation of the Palmetto Conservation Foundations’ work and efforts.

“Our affiliation with the Palmetto Conservation Foundation has been nothing but positive, and we are delighted to hear about this historic national designation of these two popular trails, that will undoubtedly better inform those in nearby communities of unrealized recreational opportunities,” Lint said. “It is our goal to encourage everyone to seek the benefits the outdoors can provide them for better health and well-being, in addition to being good stewards of their public lands.”

American Trails provides a searchable database and map of NRTs and NWTs online. Visitors can access information about a particular NRT, search for different trail activities, or get a list of all the NRTs in any state. Go online to learn more .

About The National Recreation Trails Program

The National Trails System Act of 1968 (Public Law 90-543) authorized creation of a national system of trails comprised of National Recreation Trails, National Scenic Trails, and National Historic Trails.

While National Scenic Trails and National Historic Trails may only be designated by an act of Congress, National Recreation Trails may be designated by the Secretary of Interior or the Secretary of Agriculture to recognize exemplary trails of local and regional significance in response to an application from the trail’s managing agency or organization. Through designation, these trails are recognized as part of America’s national system of trails.

The National Recreation Trails Program supports designated NRT’s with an array of benefits, including promotion, technical assistance, and networking. Its goal is to promote the use and care of existing trails and stimulate the development of new trails to create a national network of trails and realize the vision of “Trails for All Americans.”

About The Palmetto Trail

Our Mission at the Palmetto Trail is to foster an appreciation for South Carolina’s natural and cultural resources, providing opportunities for active recreation on the Palmetto Trail and other trail systems that can be enjoyed by all

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Local sections of Palmetto Trail named as National Recreation Trail | News

from A1

The Swamp Fox and Awendaw passages of the Palmetto Trail have been recognized as the newest additions to the National Recreation Trail Program. The two passages combined will now be known as The Palmetto National Recreation Trail.

A National Recreation Trail is a designated part of America’s National Trails System. Each NRT must demonstrate that it represents its region, supports a diverse community, and is among Americas best trails. This portion of South Carolina’s state-wide Palmetto Trail spans 58.05 miles and is primarily located within the Francis Marion National Forest.

“We are excited to have received the National Recreation Trail designation for the Swamp Fox and Awendaw Trail passages,” said Mary Roe, Executive Director of the Palmetto Trail. “The 58.05 miles of trail has been used by thousands of hikers and mountain bikers enjoying nature walks, bird watching, cross country runs and camping trips. This is a wonderful example of our successful partnership with the Forest Service.”

The USDA Forest Service – Francis Marion & Sumter National Forests’ Supervisor Rick Lint expressed his appreciation of the Palmetto Conservation Foundations’ work and efforts.

“Our affiliation with the Palmetto Conservation Foundation has been nothing but positive, and we are delighted to hear about this historic national designation of these two popular trails, that will undoubtedly better inform those in nearby communities of unrealized recreational opportunities,” Lint said. “It is our goal to encourage everyone to seek the benefits the outdoors can provide them for better health and well-being, in addition to being good stewards of their public lands.”

American Trails provides a searchable database and map of NRTs and NWTs online. Visitors can access information about a particular NRT, search for different trail activities, or get a list of all the NRTs in any state. Go online to learn more.

About The National Recreation Trails Program

The National Trails System Act of 1968 (Public Law 90-543) authorized creation of a national system of trails comprised of National Recreation Trails, National Scenic Trails, and National Historic Trails.

While National Scenic Trails and National Historic Trails may only be designated by an act of Congress, National Recreation Trails may be designated by the Secretary of Interior or the Secretary of Agriculture to recognize exemplary trails of local and regional significance in response to an application from the trail’s managing agency or organization. Through designation, these trails are recognized as part of America’s national system of trails.

The National Recreation Trails Program supports designated NRT’s with an array of benefits, including promotion, technical assistance, and networking. Its goal is to promote the use and care of existing trails and stimulate the development of new trails to create a national network of trails and realize the vision of “Trails for All Americans.”

About The Palmetto Trail

Our Mission at the Palmetto Trail is to foster an appreciation for South Carolina’s natural and cultural resources, providing opportunities for active recreation on the Palmetto Trail and other trail systems that can be enjoyed by all in

Continue reading

South Carolina’s Palmetto Bluff Makes Everyday Life Feel Like Vacation

The palmetto is synonymous with the state of South Carolina and its coastline, adorning the state flag and emblematic of a relaxed life lived close to nature. And that state of mind is no more present than at Palmetto Bluff, which is situated on 20,000 wild and pristine acres in the Lowcountry.

Palmetto Bluff is a conservation community with deep roots that date back thousands of years to the first Paleo-Indians who inhabited the Americas. Conserving the land has been integral to modern-day development, and today Palmetto Bluff, with its 32 miles of riverfront, offers one of the most extraordinarily unique and secluded places to call home. Here are just a few reasons why.

An unparalleled natural landscape


palmetto bluff aerial

Allen Kennedy Photography

The land is the guiding force behind Palmetto Bluff’s evolution. And from the moment you arrive, it’s obvious why, generation after generation, people have been captivated by it. Defined by three rivers—the May, Cooper, and New—the Bluff, as locals call it, is a dazzling expanse of maritime forests, tidal estuaries, winding waterways, and arching oaks draped with Spanish moss.

The Palmetto Bluff Conservancy stewards the land, surveying wildlife activity—deer, turtles, bald eagles, snowy egrets, and blue birds are just a few of the animals that live here—ensuring that the natural and built environments live in harmony. The Conservancy treats the land as a vast outdoor classroom and offers tours, workshops, and excursions so residents and visitors can learn about the history of the land—the oldest artifact found here dates back 12,000 years—and see firsthand what they’re working to protect.

The land is the guiding force behind Palmetto Bluff’s evolution.

You can also explore Palmetto Bluff’s natural treasures on your own by biking or walking one of the many maintained trails. The leisure Maritime Trail takes you through the Lowcountry forest while the Long Leaf Pine Trail winds through pine uplands and the guided three-mile Palmetto Bluff Nature Hike incorporates salt marshes and lagoons.

Thoughtful design that sits lightly on the land


palmetto bluff kayak

Palmetto Bluff

palmetto bluff house

Palmetto Bluff

A primary responsibility of the Conservancy is to see that every building constructed at Palmetto Bluff puts the landscape first. Homesites are not bulldozed en masse; they are carefully cleared to preserve old trees and maintain sightlines. Neighborhoods are categorized as “Town” or “Country,” with the latter being more private and centered on nature and open space, while the former are closer together and within walking distance to shops and amenities.

palmetto bluff lede

Palmetto Bluff

All buildings have a classic Lowcountry style—wide porches, wraparound verandas, symmetrical columns, and colonial influences—but the two districts (which they call villages) each have a distinct character.

Wilson Village, the first community at Palmetto Bluff, looks like a historic Southern town. Homes here are relaxed and inviting, built sustainably with local materials. Properties for sale here include a charming 2,205-square-foot, two-bedroom for $1.69 million and a five-bedroom with views of a 120-acre nature preserve for $2.95 million.

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