Tag: officials

WoodSpring Suites proposes new Milwaukee development. The hotel chain’s 2018 plans were rejected by city officials.

An extended-stay hotel chain that has been repeatedly rebuffed in attempts to open its first Wisconsin location is trying again — this time on Milwaukee’s far northwest side.



a car parked in front of a building: A WoodSpring Suites extended-stay hotel is being proposed for the southeast corner of West Bradley Road and North 124th Street.


© WoodSpring Suites
A WoodSpring Suites extended-stay hotel is being proposed for the southeast corner of West Bradley Road and North 124th Street.

A four-story, 122-room WoodSpring Suites is being proposed for the southeast corner of West Bradley Road and North 124th Street. 

That proposal will need Common Council approval — both to rezone the site and to grant a hotel license.

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And it comes over two years after the council rejected a license application for a WoodSpring at 1701 W. Layton Ave., on Milwaukee’s far south side.

That license was rejected in 2018 after then-Ald. Terry Witkowski, whose district included the development site, and nearby homeowners objected.

Witkowski, at a 2017 Plan Commission meeting, said WoodSpring “does not have a great reputation” and has been turned away in other Milwaukee-area communities.

The hotel chain’s niche of offering bargain-priced rooms for guests who stay several days has raised concerns in Milwaukee and other communities.

WoodSpring in 2015 proposed a similar hotel at 4040 W. Layton Ave., Greenfield.

Those plans were opposed by Greenfield officials, who said it would generate a high number of police calls. 

WoodSpring executives disputed that claim, saying their hotels have safe main entrances, security cameras and proper exterior lighting. 

The WoodSpring being proposed on Milwaukee’s far northwest side would be developed by Wichita, Kansas-based New Era Development Group LLC.

New Era’s projects include eight WoodSpring Suites locations in the Columbus, Ohio; San Antonio, Texas; Fort Worth, Texas; and Wichita areas.

Those hotels have received praise from local officials for their safety and security, said Chris Stevens, New Era managing member.

Stevens said New Era operates its hotels with 24-hour staffing, unlike how some WoodSpring locations have been managed in the past.

He also said the WoodSpring chain, which is franchised by Rockville, Maryland-based Choice Hotels International Inc., continues to grow, and operates in metro areas throughout the country without major problems.

The northwest side Milwaukee proposal has the support of Ald. Nikiya Dodd, whose district includes the site, Stevens said.

New Era would likely begin construction by late spring of 2021 if the $10 million project wins city approval, Stevens said.

It would open by late spring or early summer of 2022, he said.

Stevens said the 3-acre site has strong visibility, as well as quick access to nearby I-41.

Tom Daykin can be emailed at [email protected] and followed on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. 

Our subscribers make this reporting possible. Please consider supporting local journalism by subscribing to the Journal Sentinel at jsonline.com/deal.

This article originally appeared on Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: WoodSpring Suites proposes new Milwaukee development. The hotel chain’s 2018 plans were rejected by city officials.

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‘Assume that you were exposed’: Officials warn of the fallout from Thanksgiving travel.

While many in the United States celebrated a muted Thanksgiving over Zoom, millions of people traveled instead, rejecting the advice of public officials.

According to Transportation Safety Administration data, about 800,000 to one million people passed through T.S.A. checkpoints each day in the days before and after the holiday — far lower than the same period last year, but likely far higher than epidemiologists had hoped to see.

A United Airlines spokeswoman, Annabelle Cottee, said the week of Thanksgiving was “the busiest since March” for the carrier.

Americans also took to the roads. AAA predicted significant declines in bus, train and cruise travel, but predicted only a modest drop in car travel.

For several days leading up to Thanksgiving, as case numbers and hospitalizations across the country grew exponentially, political leaders and medical experts warned of the dangers of compounding the virus spread by being with others. In November alone, there have been more than 4.1 million cases and more than 25,500 deaths.

There were 91,635 current hospitalizations as of Nov. 28, according to the Covid Tracking Project, almost twice as many as there were on Nov. 1, and triple the number on Oct. 1.

Aware of the emotional resonance of the holiday, experts tried to thread a narrative from these numbers that would convince people of the danger. Their warnings were direct — sometimes stern, sometimes impassioned pleas.

“Keep the gatherings, the indoor gatherings as small as you possibly can,” Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease expert, said on “Good Morning America” last week. By making that sacrifice, he said, “you’re going to prevent people from getting infected.”

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention was also urging people not to travel. “All Americans want to do what they can to protect their loved ones,” Dr. Henry Walke, a Covid-19 incident manager at the C.D.C., said at a news briefing.

And though it would have been unrealistic to expect a public that is restive from months of restrictions to universally abide by such recommendations, the aftermath of those decisions will begin to unfold in the weeks ahead.

Dr. Fauci, during an appearance on the Sunday news program “This Week,” said the best course for Thanksgiving travelers might be “to quarantine yourself for a period of time.”

Dr. Deborah L. Birx, the White House coronavirus response coordinator, said that travelers “have to assume that you were exposed and you became infected and you really need to get tested in the next week.” She urged that travelers avoid anyone in their family over 65 or with underlying illnesses.

That guidance comes as the C.D.C. is considering shortening the recommended isolation period for infected people. And while it is too early to know if holiday travel will affect the virus’s spread, new research suggests that people are most infectious about two days before symptoms begin and for five days afterward, meaning this week will likely be crucial in containment.

On Monday, Mayor Bill de Blasio of New York City

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Millions of Americans travel for Thanksgiving, against advice of public health officials

Americans, millions of whom traveled against the advice of public health officials, tried to stay safe before they hunkered down with their families for Thanksgiving, a holiday remade by the pandemic as case numbers and death tolls rise.

Lily Roberts, 19, said she got tested for COVID-19 at San Francisco International Airport before driving home to Marin County in Northern California.

“I’m not worried about it because I’m not at risk,” Roberts said. “However, I do follow the rules and the precautions because of my parents. That’s why I’m getting tested because I do not want to bring it into my home.”

Thanksgiving travel traditionally comes with highs and lows but it’s even more fraught this year as travelers attempt to social distance while navigating crowds.

Lexi Cusano, 23, said Wednesday she encountered people standing too close in airport terminals, some not wearing masks or wearing them improperly, on her way from Miami to Hartford, Connecticut.

“It was just a little bit overwhelming and very shocking to me that people were just — you couldn’t move in a 6-foot radius without hitting someone or breathing in with a person next to you,” she said. “It was just a little bit crazy.”

She said travelers didn’t act any safer on the plane.

“People were just hanging out without their masks on,” said Cusano, who recently took a job in Miami. “I saw them walking back and forth from the bathroom, down the aisles, with no mask on, and I was like, this is a little bit ridiculous now.”

“You know, the main fear people have usually going on planes is: ‘Are we going to crash?’” she added. “But today, it was more like, ‘I’m breathing in the same air that’s been circulating in here and people are just being very irresponsible.’ So that was the main horror.”

Things appeared a bit cramped to Juan Mojuta who flew Wednesday night to Wilmington, North Carolina, from Arizona.

“The first flight was very claustrophobic,” Mojuta told WWAY-TV. “A lot of people. Very gathered. But the second flight wasn’t as bad.”

More than 12.7 million Americans have been diagnosed with the virus since the pandemic’s start earlier this year and deaths have topped 262,200, according to Johns Hopkins University.

Data shows the seven-day rolling average for daily new cases in the U.S. rose over the past two weeks from 127,487 on Nov. 11 to 175,809 on Thursday. The seven-day rolling average for daily new deaths rose from 1,044 to 1,658 over that time.

Millions of Americans took to the skies and the highways ahead of Thanksgiving, despite warning and pleas from elected and health officials in a number of states to stay home and keep holiday gatherings smaller than usual.

Cusano said she got tested at Bradley International Airport in Connecticut after landing and was told to expect results in two to three days.

Regardless of her test results, she said she plans to quarantine in Connecticut for a month or two to make sure

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Thanksgiving week air travel is expected to set a pandemic era-record despite officials calls to stay home

Thanksgiving week air travel is expected to remain strong enough to set a pandemic era-record despite urging from federal health officials to spend the holiday at home.



a group of people walking down the street: Millions of passengers have passed through US airport security in the last week, according to the TSA.


© David Paul Morris/Bloomberg/Getty Images
Millions of passengers have passed through US airport security in the last week, according to the TSA.

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended Americans to not travel for Thanksgiving last week — but that didn’t stop more than 1 million travelers from passing through US airport security on Sunday and more than 900,000 on Tuesday, according to the Transportation Security Administration.

Since the CDC issued that warning, nearly 5 million people have boarded airplanes. The agency receives passenger information from the airlines as part of its screening responsibilities, and the data does not show widespread cancellations in recent days, TSA spokesman Andy Post said.

From September to October, the number of scheduled available seats departing US airports was up nearly 50% compared to the same timeframe last year. That number dropped down to nearly 39% for the Thanksgiving holiday period, according to Airlines for America, a trade association that represents major North American airlines.

Still, officials still expect Sunday — when everyone heads home from their holiday travels — to be the busiest day of travel since the pandemic began.

While the number of travelers passing through airport security on Sunday is concerning, many Americans are heeding the warnings from officials and health experts. Sixty-one percent of Americans said they changed their Thanksgiving plans, according to a poll released on Tuesday by Axios-Ipsos. More surprising is that nearly one in 10 Americans that were polled say they do not plan to celebrate the holiday at all.

The country added 172,935 new Covid-19 cases and had 2,146 reported deaths on Tuesday, according to Johns Hopkins University.

Tuesday also marks the fifth highest single day for new cases during the pandemic, and the US has posted over 100,000 new coronavirus cases for the 22nd consecutive day. The US is now averaging 174,225 new cases per day, which is up 11% from last week.

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Thanksgiving Air Travel Down 60 Percent From Last Year, as Officials Tell People to Stay Home

In a sign that many people are heeding officials’ request to stay home for Thanksgiving, airplane travel in the days leading up to Thanksgiving is down about 60 percent from the same time last year.



a group of people wearing costumes: Holiday travelers pass through Los Angeles international Airport on Thanksgiving eve as the COVID-19 spike worsens and stay-at-home restrictions are increased on Wednesday in West Hollywood, California. Holiday plane travel is down dramatically from last year, but for the first time since March, more than 1 million people passed through TSA checkpoints in one day.


© David McNew/Getty
Holiday travelers pass through Los Angeles international Airport on Thanksgiving eve as the COVID-19 spike worsens and stay-at-home restrictions are increased on Wednesday in West Hollywood, California. Holiday plane travel is down dramatically from last year, but for the first time since March, more than 1 million people passed through TSA checkpoints in one day.

Cases of a new coronavirus in the United States have now surpassed 12 million. With spikes in cases occurring across the country, deaths on Tuesday were higher than they’ve been in six months. Officials urged people to stay home and imposed quarantine requirements for out-of-state visitors. While more people are traveling than health experts would like, there’s been a significant decrease from the usual holiday influx via plane travel.

20 Interesting Thanksgiving 2020 Facts You Probably Didn’t Know In 90 Seconds

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Historically, more people travel around Thanksgiving than any other time of the year, and the Wednesday before the turkey-centric holiday is the busiest travel day of the year. However, as has been the case since the pandemic started, the outbreak stunted travel around the holiday. About 1.52 million fewer people traveled on Tuesday than on the Tuesday before last year’s Thanksgiving.

From Thursday until Tuesday, the biggest drop in travelers was on Friday when 1.53 million fewer people went through TSA checkpoints than the same day of the week last year. Since Friday, about 6.9 million fewer people have passed through TSA checkpoints, a 58 percent decline from 2019, according to data from the agency.

Despite the significant decrease in travelers from last year, the number of people making their way through airports is higher than it’s been since the pandemic started.

Before mid-March, it was common to have a million people or more passing through TSA checkpoints. But daily travelers dropped below a million on March 17 and hadn’t surpassed the benchmark for eight months. That changed on Friday when 1,019,836 people passed through TSA checkpoints.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), acknowledged during a Wednesday interview with Good Morning America that it’s difficult not to gather for Thanksgiving because it’s filled with beautiful traditions. However, he said sacrificing now would prevent a rise in infections and deaths, a message officials have been touting since the start of the pandemic.

This time around, Fauci said the end is in sight because of the development of three effective vaccines. The first doses of the vaccines could be administered within 24 hours of the drug companies receiving an Emergency Use Authorization from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)—according to General Gustave Perna, who is heading “Operation Warp Speed,” the Trump administration’s plan to produce 300 million doses of a vaccine before the end

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Hotel Lincoln demolition set to go before Metro Council, officials said item will be removed | Business

The demolition of the Hotel Lincoln is set to be introduced at Tuesday’s East Baton Rouge Metro Council meeting, but officials said plans are still underway to restore the historic property.

Anthony Kimble, who owns the hotel at 400 Eddie Robinson Sr. Drive, said the demolition item will be removed from the Metro Council agenda. The demolition was set for introduction Tuesday, then to go before the council for a vote December 9.

“It’s taken care of,” Kimble said.

Historic Hotel Lincoln renovation to start soon, plans to open in 2020; see renderings

The Hotel Lincoln catered to Black entertainers, such as Aretha Franklin, James Brown and B.B. King. Plans are in the works to turn the building into apartments and short-term rentals. The hotel, which opened in 1955, has been closed since the 1980s.

Hotel Lincoln re-developers seek tax incentive for $1.75M conversion into apartment, retail space

According to a report from a city parish building inspector filed with the agenda, the Hotel Lincoln was found to be “in a dilapidated and dangerous condition”.

Planning Commission to look at redevelopment of historic Hotel Lincoln where Aretha Franklin, James Brown and B.B. King stayed

Davis Rhorer, executive director of the Downtown Development District, said he spoke to Planning Director Ryan Holcomb about the demolition motion. Holcomb said the hotel had been secured and the item will be removed from the agenda, Rhorer said. The DDD has been supportive of efforts to get the Hotel Lincoln back in business.

Rhorer said the redevelopment of the hotel is still underway. “This is an important building,” he said.

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Despite officials’ warnings and pleas, travel over Thanksgiving is expected to hit a pandemic peak.

The nation’s health experts on Sunday pleaded with Americans to stay home over the Thanksgiving holiday and forgo any plans to travel or celebrate at large family gatherings, even as airports have recorded a significant rise in passengers.

Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, the country’s top infectious disease specialist, and other health experts relayed a clear message on Sunday morning news shows: with coronavirus cases surging to record levels across the country, turning nearly every state into a hot zone of transmission, the risk of getting infected, whether in transit or in even small indoor gatherings, is high.

Up to 50 million people could be traveling on roads and through airports in the United States over Thanksgiving this year, according to AAA, the biggest travel surge since the pandemic began, despite strong cautions from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other health authorities. A video of a packed airport in Phoenix has been circulating widely on social media. As of Sunday, 47 states — all but Hawaii, Maine and Vermont — were considered high-risk zones for viral transmission, and nationwide hospitalizations were at a record 83,227.

“Please seriously consider decisions that you make,” Dr. Fauci said on the CBS show “Face the Nation.” Encountering large numbers of people in airports and on planes is particularly dangerous, he said. Although airlines have invested in air circulation and ventilation systems to minimize viral transmission, Dr. Fauci said, “sometimes when you get a crowded plane, or you’re in a crowded airport, you’re lining up, not everybody’s wearing masks — that puts yourself at risk.”

And gathering indoors, whether you travel or not, carries risk. “When you’re eating and drinking, obviously, you have to take your mask off,” Dr. Fauci said. “We know now that those are the kinds of situations that are leading to outbreaks.”

Dr. Tom Inglesby, director of the Center for Health Security of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, said on Fox News on Sunday that because about half of infections are spread by people who don’t have any symptoms, “you can’t assume that you don’t have the virus, and you can’t assume that the people whose home you’re about to enter don’t have the virus, at this point in our pandemic.”

He recommended celebrating Thanksgiving only with the people you live with. People who choose to visit others’ homes should spend as much time as possible outdoors and “should be wearing masks indoors when they’re together, and only removing them when they’re eating.”

In Tulsa, Okla., Victory, a megachurch, canceled a “Friendsgiving” service on Sunday that had called on members to bring a friend after it prompted an outcry, instead opting to give away boxed meals, NBC News reported. The church did not respond to a request for comment regarding its planned “Thanksgiving Day Brunch,” which, according to its website, is set to be held on Thursday in the church’s cafeteria.

Dr. Fauci and others warned that Americans’ behavior over Thanksgiving would have critical implications for

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Michigan GOP officials were pictured drinking champagne in the lobby of Trump’s luxury DC hotel after meeting the president to discuss attempts to overturn the election result



a close up of a train station: US flags are seen at the entrance to the Turmp International Hotel at Pennsylvania Avenue on the eve of the 2020 US presidential election Yegor AleyevTASS via Getty Images


© Yegor AleyevTASS via Getty Images
US flags are seen at the entrance to the Turmp International Hotel at Pennsylvania Avenue on the eve of the 2020 US presidential election Yegor AleyevTASS via Getty Images

  • Michigan GOP officials were pictured drinking Dom Perignon champagne in the lobby of President Trump’s luxury Washington DC hotel on Friday night. 
  • Hours earlier, the officials met Trump at the White House, amid the president’s campaign to pressure state officials to overturn the election result. 
  • In a joint statement after the meeting, state GOP leaders said they were not “made aware of any information that would change the outcome of the election in Michigan.” 
  • The lawmakers told CNN they had paid their own bills at the hotel. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Michigan Republican Party officials were pictured enjoying champagne in the lobby of President Donald Trump’s luxury Washington DC hotel after being hosted by the president at the White House.

Michigan House Speaker Lee Chatfield and other members of his group were pictured at Trump International Hotel in Washington DC Friday evening drinking Dom Perignon champagne in a lobby bar, in images acquired by the Detroit Free Press. 

Both Chatfield and Senate Majority Leader Mike Shirkey stayed overnight at the hotel, located a few blocks from the White House. Trump had earlier held a meeting with the lawmakers, reported CNN. 

 

The following morning, Shirkey and state Republican official Dan Lauwers were pictured leaving the hotel by Detroit News’ Washington correspondent Melissa Nana Burke. They did not answer any questions from her. 

In a tweet, a staffer for Democratic Michigan Rep. Dan Kildee accused the lawmakers pictured in the lobby of violating coronavirus guidelines, with none of the group wearing masks or observing social distancing. 

 

Spokespeople for Chatfield and Shirkey told CNN that the lawmakers had paid their own expenses at the hotel. 

 

The lawmakers did not immediately respond to a request for comment from Business Insider. 

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Earlier on Friday, the lawmakers met Trump at the White House. Trump has continued his long-shot bid to overturn the election result by pressuring state Republican officials to delay certifying vote counts. Biden was projected winner in Michigan by media organizations more than two weeks ago. 

After the meeting, Chatfield and Shirkey in a joint statement said that they had not been “made aware of any information that would change the outcome of the election in Michigan” and said “as legislative leaders, we will follow the law and follow the normal process regarding Michigan’s electors, just as we have said throughout this election.”

They claimed that a coronavirus relief package for Michigan was the focus of their talks with the president. 

In response to the statement, Trump said in a tweet Saturday that evidence of fraud would be shown in court. 

“This is true, but much different than reported

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Negative COVID-19 test ‘not a passport’ to travel, officials warn, as demand surges

California residents who think a negative coronavirus test gives them the greenlight to travel this holiday season should think again, officials say.



a group of people with luggage at an airport: A flight crew wearing personal protective equipment walks through Tom Bradley International Terminal at LAX. (Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)


© Provided by The LA Times
A flight crew wearing personal protective equipment walks through Tom Bradley International Terminal at LAX. (Francine Orr / Los Angeles Times)

Public health officials across the state are warning that using testing to justify hitting the road or gathering in other ways doesn’t work.

As California struggles amid an unprecedented surge in coronavirus cases, and Thanksgiving and other holidays are right around the corner, demand for testing in Los Angeles and San Francisco counties has skyrocketed. The same situation is playing out nationwide, straining testing sites that are running short of key supplies.

“We have seen the repeated failure of this type of testing strategy across the country, including in Washington, D.C.,” Dr. Grant Colfax, San Francisco’s director of health, said at a briefing this week. “A negative test cannot be an excuse to put yourself or others at risk.”

A person who tests negative can still carry the virus if it’s early in their infection, health officials say.

Testing “is an identifier at that moment,” Los Angeles County public health officer Dr. Muntu Davis said Thursday, noting that it isn’t a preventative measure nor a barometer for future illness.

Even before the statewide spike in cases, officials were strongly advising against nonessential travel. Anyone leaving the state or arriving from out of state should quarantine for 14 days, regardless of their test results, Davis said. Even the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is urging Americans to stay home.

San Francisco officials have asked residents not to misuse testing facilities in an effort to travel, adding that the services are intended for essential workers, those who are symptomatic or who have been exposed to the virus.

“If people need tests for any other reason — like travel or visiting — they need to go to their private provider,” the city said in a statement. “City resources cannot support testing for behaviors, such as travel and visits with extended family, that are currently not recommended during this surge.”

San Francisco currently tests about 6,000 people a day, with results available in one to two days, officials said.

Los Angeles officials stopped short of advising residents to avoid testing, but health officials warn that test results are merely a snapshot in time and not intended as a free pass to willfully disobey health orders or recommendations.

“Your test result that you got Saturday morning was from Thursday when you got tested, and it said, ‘On Thursday, you were negative,’ ” said Barbara Ferrer, Los Angeles County’s director of public health. “It says nothing about whether you’re still negative on Saturday.

“That’s actually a false sense of security. It’s a false narrative.”

Though testing demand has shot up in recent weeks, a spokeswoman for Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti said that capacity has not been reached at city sites. Officials anticipated the increased

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Negative COVID test ‘not a passport’ to travel, officials warn

California residents who think a negative coronavirus test gives them the greenlight to travel this holiday season should think again, officials say.

Public health officials across the state are warning that using testing to justify hitting the road or gathering in other ways doesn’t work.

As California struggles amid an unprecedented surge in coronavirus cases, and Thanksgiving and other holidays are right around the corner, demand for testing in Los Angeles and San Francisco counties has skyrocketed. The same situation is playing out nationwide, straining testing sites that are running short of key supplies.

“We have seen the repeated failure of this type of testing strategy across the country, including in Washington, D.C.,” Dr. Grant Colfax, San Francisco’s director of health, said at a briefing this week. “A negative test cannot be an excuse to put yourself or others at risk.”

A person who tests negative can still carry the virus if it’s early in their infection, health officials say.

Testing “is an identifier at that moment,” Los Angeles County public health officer Dr. Muntu Davis said Thursday, noting that it isn’t a preventative measure nor a barometer for future illness.

Even before the statewide spike in cases, officials were strongly advising against nonessential travel. Anyone leaving the state or arriving from out of state should quarantine for 14 days, regardless of their test results, Davis said. Even the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is urging Americans to stay home.

San Francisco officials have asked residents not to misuse testing facilities in an effort to travel, adding that the services are intended for essential workers, those who are symptomatic or who have been exposed to the virus.

“If people need tests for any other reason — like travel or visiting — they need to go to their private provider,” the city said in a statement. “City resources cannot support testing for behaviors, such as travel and visits with extended family, that are currently not recommended during this surge.”

San Francisco currently tests about 6,000 people a day, with results available in one to two days, officials said.

Los Angeles officials stopped short of advising residents to avoid testing, but health officials warn that test results are merely a snapshot in time and not intended as a free pass to willfully disobey health orders or recommendations.

“Your test result that you got Saturday morning was from Thursday when you got tested, and it said, ‘On Thursday, you were negative,’ ” said Barbara Ferrer, Los Angeles County’s director of public health. “It says nothing about whether you’re still negative on Saturday.

“That’s actually a false sense of security. It’s a false narrative.”

Though testing demand has shot up in recent weeks, a spokeswoman for Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti said that capacity has not been reached at city sites. Officials anticipated the increased interest, expanding hours and adding supplies.

The city is testing an average of 27,000 people a day, with a capacity to test about 34,000 people daily, the mayor’s

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