Tag: offer

‘Sound walks’ offer a new way to travel in lockdown

The bear’s throaty growl starts to my right, then circles predatorily around to my left as I turn. But I stay calm, because the beast is not really there – it’s an illusion. I’m on a street corner in Leeds on a bright, chilly autumn morning and there are no bears for thousands of miles – or at least there haven’t been for well over a century.

Between 1840 and 1858, before Burley Park was all tarmac and terraced housing, the street where I’m standing was part of the short-lived Headingley Zoological and Botanical Gardens. I’m on a guided “sound walk” around the graffitied remnants of its walls, and I’ve just reached Bearpit Gardens.

A Garden Through Time, produced by community project 365 Leeds Stories, is an immersive, geo-located audio walk – one of about 50 UK routes available on the Echoes app. As I move about, the GPS on my phone tracks my exact movements and responds by triggering music, sounds and speech. At Bearpit Gardens, Pauline Mayers, a local artist and choreographer, talks about how the flora and fauna in Britain’s zoological and botanical gardens was an embodiment of empire and slavery in the Victorian era. It’s insightful, engaging and acutely rooted in the surroundings. The murmur of birdsong in my ear recedes as I walk on from Bearpit Gardens.

Like many people, I have struggled to come to terms with personal confinement during the pandemic, but sound walks have presented a new way to travel – physically, mentally and, occasionally, back in time.

“The beauty of it is that we’re a very broad church,” says Andrew Stuck, who in 2017 cofounded what has come to be known as Sound Walk September. Each year, people from as far away as Japan, Belgium and Brazil submit sound walks – similar to A Garden Through Time to the Walk Listen Create platform. Entries are whittled down to a shortlist in October by an independent panel and a winner is picked at the end of the year.

This year’s shortlist ranges from performative art to reportage and travelogue. Some, like Bath Workhouse Burial Ground: Walking the Names, are site-responsive. This piece involves layered readings from a burial register that kick in as you walk around the unmarked grave of 3,000 people who perished in a forgotten Bath workhouse between 1858 and 1899.

Some are more like sophisticated audio travel guides: The Last Eccentrics of Greenwich Village takes listeners on a walk around the New York neighbourhood via its 1960s counterculture roots.

Other sound walks can be done from the armchair. My favourite is The Ears May Travel, which describes itself as “a vacation for the senses”. One segment is a meditative swim from cave to city in Crete. Its creator, Carina Pesch, uses binaural recording (with multiple microphones) to create a 3D stereo experience: it feels like being sloshed about by waves between swimming strokes. “I am especially interested in the thin borderline between reality and fiction, because sometimes

Continue reading

Sabre strengthens partnership with Qantas to offer travel industry more rich content

SOUTHLAKE, Texas, Nov. 3, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Sabre Corporation (NASDAQ: SABR), a leading software and technology provider that powers the global travel industry, today announced an enhancement to its agreement with Qantas that will offer agents access to richer information about the airline’s fares, products and services.

Sabre’s graphical Sabre Red 360 interface will now showcase Qantas products with rich, relevant and engaging content through the airline’s connection with ATPCO. 

  • Sabre will integrate Qantas’ UPAs (Universal Product Attributes), or targeted visual content, that bring unique airline fares, products and services to life. This content has recently expanded into Reassurance UPAs which highlight messaging and graphics about the additional health measures airlines like Qantas are taking to ensure a safe travel environment.
  • Sabre Red 360 will also showcase Qantas Amenities, such as seat pitch and power outlets, and UTAs (Universal Ticket Attributes) which are consumer-friendly benefits such as baggage allowance and seat selection.

The connection to Qantas’ ATPCO Routehappy Rich Content expands on Sabre’s existing partnership with Qantas through its Branded Fares solution to deliver greater value to the industry.

Sabre Vice President, Regional General Manager, Asia Pacific, Travel Solutions, Airline Sales, Rakesh Narayanan welcomed the expansion of its longstanding partnership with Qantas.

“We’re delighted Qantas has enabled Routehappy Rich Content program through Sabre Red 360,” said Narayanan. “This will provide our agency partners with an even richer shopping experience when booking and servicing Qantas customers. Qantas is one of the world’s most innovative airlines and this latest initiative demonstrates their commitment to the agency distribution channel and the use of Sabre technology to support booking growth and industry recovery.”

Qantas Executive Manager, Global Sales and Distribution, Igor Kwiatkowski, said the airline was pleased to showcase Qantas’ Routehappy Rich Content to agents through Sabre Red 360.

“For more than ten years, Sabre has provided Qantas with a marketplace to promote our products to the industry in new and different ways,” said Kwiatkowski. “The addition of Qantas’ Routehappy Rich Content builds on our relationship with Sabre and will enable us to provide agents with even more information about our fares and services. This includes more descriptive and engaging content around features such as lounge access, baggage allowances and more recently, our Fly Well program to help inform customers about the health and safety measures we’ve put in place to ensure a safe travel environment.”

ATPCO commented that it was fantastic to have Qantas enable its Routehappy Rich Content via Sabre.

“At a time when situations can change rapidly as we navigate our way through this pandemic and airlines need to make the most of every seat, ATPCO’s Routehappy Rich Content can provide a win-win-win scenario for travel consultants to better navigate important content, for airlines to differentiate their offer, and for travellers who are ultimately able to get the personalized travel experiences they want and expect,” said Dari Brooks Ahye, Senior Merchandising Strategist at ATPCO.

About Sabre Corporation
Sabre Corporation is a leading software and technology company that powers

Continue reading

Here’s the Opportunity Covid-19 Could Offer Travel and Tourism Brands



a person standing on a lush green field: Here's the Opportunity Covid-19 Could Offer Travel and Tourism Brands


© Getty Images
Here’s the Opportunity Covid-19 Could Offer Travel and Tourism Brands

Focus on relationship-building with your customers, rather than getting them to take action

Loading...

Load Error

It’s not a rosy time for the travel and tourism industry.

Hundreds of thousands of people depend on travelers to make their living, from the event planning companies that orchestrate multinational conferences, to the individuals who work behind hotel, car rental, and cruise ship reception desks. Entire communities, like those in the Virgin Islands or Hawaii, depend on tourism as the very foundation of their economies.

With global tourist arrivals expected to be down anywhere from 58 to 90 percent throughout 2020, tourism-based brands are having to rethink the way they market themselves, and the value they can offer, to a public that likely won’t book a trip or a stay until 2021.

Here are a few guidelines.

Use this time to focus on relationship-building with your customers, rather than getting them to take action.

Generally, travel and tourism marketing focuses on encouraging people to take action: to book a trip, or a stay, or a flight, now.

During the pandemic, that call to action will fall flat with a large percentage of potential customers, and even come off as irresponsible or aggressive with others.

That’s why the right thing to do is to shift your focus to strengthening and deepening your relationship with your customers. From enhancing your brand’s storytelling, to creating additional personalization options for when customers are ready to travel, relationship-building takes many forms.

Use the avenues available to you, like social media and video, to communicate the steps you’re currently taking to protect your staff and guests from the virus, as well as to reassure the public that you’ll be there for them–with safety and health precautions in place–when they do decide to come back.

Finally, one effective relationship-building step you can take is to invest in your customer service team. Customers who’d planned upcoming trips before the pandemic struck may be canceling or changing their plans now. It’s in everyone’s best interest to make that process as smooth and accommodating for them as possible, so that once the world does open back up again, those customers will return.

Partner with other local businesses and associations.

Travel and tourism depends on partnerships in the best of times. Now, those partnerships are even more critical to the industry’s survival.

One great example I’ve seen is from the Kapaa Business Association (KBA) in Kauai, Hawaii. Kauai, along with the other Hawaiian islands is struggling, with tourism down 96-98 percent. Estimates are that it won’t be up to pre-pandemic levels for at least four years.

One strategy that the KBA is using to help its member organizations stay afloat is creating a single online marketplace where businesses can list their goods and services for sale. The

Continue reading

Suffolk Parks & Recreation to offer youth soccer, basketball clinics this winter

SUFFOLK, Va. (WAVY) — Suffolk Parks & Recreation will be offering youth Soccer Skills Clinics and Basketball Skills Clinics this winter.

The clinics will be held in January and February at the recreation centers in Suffolk. Skills Clinics are a great way to keep your children active this season.

Youth Soccer Skills Clinics

The soccer clinics will be held at Oakland Recreation Center located at 5505 Godwin Boulevard. Registration begins October 21 and ends December 15. The cost of the program is $35 for residents and $40 for non-residents. Proof of age is required at registration. All participants will receive a t-shirt and water bottle.

Times and ages groups are as follows:

  • Session 1: January 9 through January 30, 2021
    • 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. (4-5 year olds)
    • 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. (6-7 year olds)
    • Noon to 1 p.m. (8-10 year olds)
  • Session 2: February 6 through February 27, 2021
    • 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. (4-5 year olds)
    • 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. (11-12 year olds)
    • Noon to 1 p.m. (13-15 year olds)

The clinics provide a fun, safe, and structured environment for participants to learn new skills, learn how to play soccer, and build friendships.

Youth Basketball Skills Clinics

The basketball clinics will be held at Kings Fork Recreation Center located at 350 Kings Fork Road. Registration begins October 21 and ends December 15. The cost of the program is $35 for residents and $40 for non-residents. Proof of age is required at registration. All participants will receive a t-shirt and water bottle.

Times and ages groups are as follows:

  • Session 1: January 9 through January 30, 2021
    • 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. (4-5 year olds)
    • 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. (6-7 year olds)
    • Noon to 1 p.m. (8-10 year olds)
  • Session 2: February 6 through February 27, 2021
    • 9 a.m. to 10 a.m. (4-5 year olds)
    • 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. (11-12 year olds)
    • Noon to 1 p.m. (13-15 year olds)

The clinics provide a fun, safe, and structured environment for participants to learn new skills, learn how to play basketball, and build friendships.

Safety Precautions & COVID-19 Information

To comply with the Governor’s Forward Virginia Phased Plan regarding recreational sports, city officials released information on the COVID-19 safety rules and procedures in place.

Adults accompanying minors should use the adult’s best judgment with respect to placing face coverings on a minor between the ages of two through nine while inside the clinic facility.

For all participants age 10 and up, masks must be worn when entering the facility but may be removed while participating.

Everyone entering the facility will be asked health screening questions regarding COVID-19 symptoms, and temporal no-touch body temperature scans will be taken. No one with a temperature at or above 100.4 degrees will be permitted in the clinic facility.

Everyone entering the clinic facility will be required to maintain 10 feet of social distancing between non-family members where practicable.

In order to reduce the number of people in the facility, participants and

Continue reading