Tag: lifting

Will Trump Save Airlines By Lifting Travel Restrictions?

KEY POINTS

  • The consideration was cleared by the White House pandemic task force
  • The CDC, however, is still advising against all-but essential travel
  • The industry is expecting revenues to come in some 60% lower than last year

The Trump administration may consider lifting some travel bans as a way to prop up the struggling airline industry.

U.S. officials and those in the airline industry told Reuters in an exclusive that the Trump administration is reconsidering some entry restrictions. They’re considering lifting the ban on those who have recently been in Brazil as well as Britain, Ireland and 26 other European countries.

“Many administration officials argue the restrictions no longer make sense given that most countries around the world are not subject to the entry ban,” the report, published Wednesday, read. “They contend lifting the restrictions would be a boost to struggling U.S. airlines, which have seen international travel fall by 70%, according to airline industry data.”

President Donald Trump ordered a ban on most non-U.S. visitors from China in late January and followed suit on Iran in February. Travel restrictions were enacted in March that bar many visitors from Europe from entering the country. A similar restriction was enacted for Brazilian travelers in May.

Most non-U.S. residents are prohibited from entering U.S. territories if they’ve been in any of those countries 14 days prior to travel. Exceptions are in place for journalists, humanitarian travel, public health issues and national security.

This week, the International Air Transport Association estimated the industry would post sector-wide revenue of about $328 billion, about 60% lower than last year.

“This crisis is devastating and implacable,” IATA director general Alexandre de Juniac said in a statement.

Last week, United Airlines said it expected air travel to decline by “at least” 55% in the fourth quarter compared with the same period in 2019. For British Airways, the situation is so bad that it starting selling items like slippers and beverage carts to the public.

While generating revenue, that move was also a way for the airline to clear out warehouses building up with goods because of limits to seating and cabin service.

Reuters reported the consideration of lifting some travel restrictions got the blessing of the White House task force working to address the pandemic. But on Wednesday, a report found the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advised against traveling unless it’s absolutely essential.

At best, U.S. citizens can travel internationally provided they have a negative test for COVID-19 within 72 hours of entry or self-quarantine for 14 days.

Airport authorities said the weekend before Thanksgiving saw the most fliers since the outbreak of the pandemic in March Airport authorities said the weekend before Thanksgiving saw the most fliers since the outbreak of the pandemic in March Photo: AFP / Kena Betancur

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White House considers lifting European travel restrictions, Reuters reports

The White House is considering rescinding entry bans for most non-U.S. citizens who recently were in Brazil, Britain, Ireland and 26 other European countries, five U.S. and airline officials told Reuters.

The Trump administration imposed the bans in a bid to contain the novel coronavirus pandemic. It is not considering lifting separate entry bans on most non-U.S. citizens who have recently been in China or Iran, the officials said.

The plan has won the backing of White House coronavirus task-force members, public health and other federal agencies, the people briefed on the matter said, but President Donald Trump has not made a final decision and the timing remains uncertain.

The White House, Department of Homeland Security and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) did not comment.

Many administration officials argue the restrictions no longer make sense given that most countries around the world are not subject to the entry ban. They contend lifting the restrictions would be a boost to struggling U.S. airlines, which have seen international travel fall by 70%, according to airline industry data.

Trump may still opt not to lift the restrictions, given the high number of coronavirus infections in Europe. One potential hurdle is the fact that European countries are not likely to immediately allow most Americans to resume visits, officials said.

The European countries that are subject to the U.S. entry restrictions include the 26 members of the Schengen area that allow travel across open borders.

The U.S. restrictions barring most visitors from Europe have been in place since mid-March, while the Brazilian entry ban was imposed in May. Trump implemented the first ban on most non-U.S. visitors from China on Jan. 31 and then added Iran in February.

The restrictions bar entry of most non-U.S. residents who have been in those countries in the previous 14 days, but the U.S. State Department has been granting some “national interest exceptions” to allow travelers from Europe related to “humanitarian travel, public health response, and national security.”

The United States has also approved exceptions for some European business travelers, investors, academics, students and journalists.

Nearly all of Europe still bans most U.S. travelers from visiting, while Britain and Ireland allow American visits but require two-weeks quarantine upon arrival. Brazil allows U.S. travelers.

On Saturday, the CDC issued new travel and testing recommendations for international air travelers recommending they “get tested with a viral test 1-3 days before their flight to reduce spread during travel. Travelers should get tested 3-5 days after travel and stay home for 7 days.”

Airlines for America, a group representing American Airlines, Delta Air Lines, United Airlines Holdings and others, on Tuesday noted it has “been advocating for the federal government to set a national standard on testing in order to lift travel restrictions.”

In a statement to Reuters, the group called the CDC guidance a step in the right direction, adding that they hoped it would be “followed by a recognition that testing can be used to safely reopen borders without

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White House considering lifting European travel restrictions, source says

The White House is strongly considering lifting sweeping restrictions on travel from the European Union and the United Kingdom, an administration official confirmed on Wednesday.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: WASHINGTON, DC - NOVEMBER 20: U.S. President Donald Trump looks on in the James Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House on November 20, 2020 in Washington, DC. U.S. President Donald Trump held his first press conference in over a week to make an announcement on prescription drug prices as he continues to challenge the results of the 2020 Presidential election. (Photo by Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images)


© Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC – NOVEMBER 20: U.S. President Donald Trump looks on in the James Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House on November 20, 2020 in Washington, DC. U.S. President Donald Trump held his first press conference in over a week to make an announcement on prescription drug prices as he continues to challenge the results of the 2020 Presidential election. (Photo by Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images)

Discussions have been ongoing for several weeks now about lifting the restrictions, which ban entry to most foreigners who have been to Europe in the two weeks before their arrival in the US. Reuters first reported on the discussions.

The White House did not immediately respond to a CNN request for comment.

An administration official told CNN that the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has expressed some reservations about lifting the restrictions, but the agency is not expected to block the move.

The discussions come at a time when the US is experiencing its worst surge of coronavirus, and as many European countries also face higher levels of coronavirus cases.

President Donald Trump has yet to sign off on the move, but once he does, the restrictions are unlikely to be lifted until the US and European countries have established a protocol for safe travel.

Trump first banned most travel from the European Union and the UK in March amid an escalating pandemic. The EU soon followed suit, restricting most travel from the US and other countries.

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Exclusive: White House considers lifting European travel restrictions – sources

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The White House is considering rescinding entry bans for most non-U.S. citizens who recently were in Brazil, Britain, Ireland and 26 other European countries, five U.S. and airline officials told Reuters.

FILE PHOTO: Travellers wearing protective face masks make a selfie inside at Paris Charles de Gaulle airport in Roissy, after the U.S. banned travel from Europe, as France grapples with the novel coronavirus, March 12, 2020. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier

The Trump administration imposed the bans in a bid to contain the novel coronavirus pandemic. It is not considering lifting separate entry bans on most non-U.S. citizens who have recently been in China or Iran, the officials said.

The plan has won the backing of White House coronavirus task-force members, public health and other federal agencies, the people briefed on the matter said, but President Donald Trump has not made a final decision and the timing remains uncertain.

The White House, Department of Homeland Security and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) did not comment.

Many administration officials argue the restrictions no longer make sense given that most countries around the world are not subject to the entry ban. They contend lifting the restrictions would be a boost to struggling U.S. airlines, which have seen international travel fall by 70%, according to airline industry data.

Trump may still opt not to lift the restrictions, given the high number of coronavirus infections in Europe. One potential hurdle is the fact that European countries are not likely to immediately allow most Americans to resume visits, officials said.

The European countries that are subject to the U.S. entry restrictions include the 26 members of the Schengen area that allow travel across open borders.

The U.S. restrictions barring most visitors from Europe have been in place since mid-March, while the Brazilian entry ban was imposed in May. Trump implemented the first ban on most non-U.S. visitors from China on Jan. 31 and then added Iran in February.

The restrictions bar entry of most non-U.S. residents who have been in those countries in the previous 14 days, but the U.S. State Department has been granting some “national interest exceptions” to allow travelers from Europe related to “humanitarian travel, public health response, and national security.”

The United States has also approved exceptions for some European business travelers, investors, academics, students and journalists.

Nearly all of Europe still bans most U.S. travelers from visiting, while Britain and Ireland allow American visits but require two-weeks quarantine upon arrival. Brazil allows U.S. travelers.

On Saturday, the CDC issued new travel and testing recommendations for international air travelers recommending they “get tested with a viral test 1-3 days before their flight to reduce spread during travel. Travelers should get tested 3-5 days after travel and stay home for 7 days.”

Airlines for America, a group representing American Airlines, Delta Air Lines, United Airlines Holdings and others, on Tuesday noted it has “been advocating for the federal government to set a national standard on testing in order to

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Exclusive: White House Considers Lifting European Travel Restrictions – Sources | World News

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The White House is considering rescinding entry bans for most non-U.S. citizens who recently were in Brazil, Britain, Ireland and 26 other European countries, five U.S. and airline officials told Reuters.

The Trump administration imposed the bans in a bid to contain the novel coronavirus pandemic. It is not considering lifting separate entry bans on most non-U.S. citizens who have recently been in China or Iran, the officials said.

The plan has won the backing of White House coronavirus task-force members, public health and other federal agencies, the people briefed on the matter said, but President Donald Trump has not made a final decision and the timing remains uncertain.

The White House, Department of Homeland Security and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) did not comment.

Many administration officials argue the restrictions no longer make sense given that most countries around the world are not subject to the entry ban. They contend lifting the restrictions would be a boost to struggling U.S. airlines, which have seen international travel fall by 70%, according to airline industry data.

Trump may still opt not to lift the restrictions, given the high number of coronavirus infections in Europe. One potential hurdle is the fact that European countries are not likely to immediately allow most Americans to resume visits, officials said.

The European countries that are subject to the U.S. entry restrictions include the 26 members of the Schengen area that allow travel across open borders.

The U.S. restrictions barring most visitors from Europe have been in place since mid-March, while the Brazilian entry ban was imposed in May. Trump implemented the first ban on most non-U.S. visitors from China on Jan. 31 and then added Iran in February.

The restrictions bar entry of most non-U.S. residents who have been in those countries in the previous 14 days, but the U.S. State Department has been granting some “national interest exceptions” to allow travelers from Europe related to “humanitarian travel, public health response, and national security.”

The United States has also approved exceptions for some European business travelers, investors, academics, students and journalists.

Nearly all of Europe still bans most U.S. travelers from visiting, while Britain and Ireland allow American visits but require two-weeks quarantine upon arrival. Brazil allows U.S. travelers.

On Saturday, the CDC issued new travel and testing recommendations for international air travelers recommending they “get tested with a viral test 1-3 days before their flight to reduce spread during travel. Travelers should get tested 3-5 days after travel and stay home for 7 days.”

Airlines for America, a group representing American Airlines, Delta Air Lines, United Airlines Holdings and others, on Tuesday noted it has “been advocating for the federal government to set a national standard on testing in order to lift travel restrictions.”

In a statement to Reuters, the group called the CDC guidance a step in the right direction, adding that they hoped it would be “followed by a recognition that testing can be used to safely

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The US is reportedly close to lifting its 8-month travel ban for Europe, now that its own COVID-19 outbreak is far worse



a group of people performing on a counter: Travelers walk through a nearly empty terminal at Boston's Logan Airport on November 20. AP Photo/Michael Dwyer


© AP Photo/Michael Dwyer
Travelers walk through a nearly empty terminal at Boston’s Logan Airport on November 20. AP Photo/Michael Dwyer

  • The White House is considering lifting the travel ban on non-US citizens coming from Europe and Brazil, Reuters reported.
  • President Trump has not made up his mind yet, but the plan is supported by members of the White House coronavirus task force and other agencies, according to Reuters.
  • The US barred entry to travellers from Europe in March as the outbreak surged there, but the US outbreak has now spent months as the world’s worst-affected country.
  • Currently, non-US residents who have been in European nations or Brazil in the previous 14 days can’t enter the US, though some travellers are considered exceptions.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The White House is considering lifting its travel ban on inbound travel to the US from Europe and Brazil, Reuters reported early Wednesday.

It comes as the US’s coronavirus outbreak continues to be the worst in the world.

Reuters cited five US and airline officials saying that an end to the ban was close.

It reported that the plan is supported by members of the White House’s coronavirus task force and other federal agencies.

But it said that President Donald Trump has not yet decided whether he supports it. There is currently no date for when an easing may take place.

The US banned travellers from Europe in March in an effort to stop the spread of COVID-19, and added Brazil in May.

But the US outbreak has spiralled since, and the US has now spent months as the country with the highest number of virus cases and deaths in the world.

Not long after the US put its ban in place, much of Europe likewise banned entry from the US.

Video: 2019: Trump signs executive order to overhaul organ transplant and kidney dialysis (The Washington Post)

2019: Trump signs executive order to overhaul organ transplant and kidney dialysis

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More than 12.5 million people in the US have now been infected by the coronavirus, and more than 259,000 people have died from it. The US is currently in the middle of a third surge, with its cases at an all-time high.

Europe’s cases rose rapidly in the last few months after the virus was brought under control over the summer. But the continent’s cases have started falling after countries implemented lockdowns and new restrictions.

Here’s how the US’s outbreak looks:



chart, histogram: The US's new daily coronavirus cases as of November 24. Worldometer


© Worldometer
The US’s new daily coronavirus cases as of November 24. Worldometer


 

And here’s the outbreak across Europe, where cases have started falling again:



The number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 across the EU/EEA and the UK, as of November 25. ECDC


© ECDC
The number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 across the EU/EEA and the UK, as of November 25. ECDC

The lower infection rate in Europe may prompt Trump to decide against lifting the ban, Reuters reported.

Currently, non-US residents who have been in the European countries or Brazil over the last 14 days can’t enter, though there are

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White House close to lifting Europe COVID-19 travel ban: Reuters

  • The White House is considering lifting the travel ban on non-US citizens coming from Europe and Brazil, Reuters reported.
  • President Trump has not made up his mind yet, but the plan is supported by members of the White House coronavirus task force and other agencies, according to Reuters.
  • The US barred entry to travellers from Europe in March as the outbreak surged there, but the US outbreak has now spent months as the world’s worst-affected country.
  • Currently, non-US residents who have been in European nations or Brazil in the previous 14 days can’t enter the US, though some travellers are considered exceptions.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The White House is considering lifting its travel ban on inbound travel to the US from Europe and Brazil, Reuters reported early Wednesday.

It comes as the US’s coronavirus outbreak continues to be the worst in the world.

Reuters cited five US and airline officials saying that an end to the ban was close.

It reported that the plan is supported by members of the White House’s coronavirus task force and other federal agencies.

But it said that President Donald Trump has not yet decided whether he supports it. There is currently no date for when an easing may take place.

The US banned travellers from Europe in March in an effort to stop the spread of COVID-19, and added Brazil in May.

But the US outbreak has spiralled since, and the US has now spent months as the country with the highest number of virus cases and deaths in the world.

Not long after the US put its ban in place, much of Europe likewise banned entry from the US.

More than 12.5 million people in the US have now been infected by the coronavirus, and more than 259,000 people have died from it. The US is currently in the middle of a third surge, with its cases at an all-time high.

Europe’s cases rose rapidly in the last few months after the virus was brought under control over the summer. But the continent’s cases have started falling after countries implemented lockdowns and new restrictions.

Here’s how the US’s outbreak looks:

Worldometer

The US’s new daily coronavirus cases as of November 24.

Worldometer


 

And here’s the outbreak across Europe, where cases have started falling again:

Europe infections

The number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 across the EU/EEA and the UK, as of November 25.

ECDC


The lower infection rate in Europe may prompt Trump to decide against lifting the ban, Reuters reported.

Currently, non-US residents who have been in the European countries or Brazil over the last 14 days can’t enter, though there are some travellers that are considered exceptions.

Reuters reported that many officials say the ban on Europe and Brazil doesn’t make sense because travellers from other countries with similarly severe outbreaks are not banned from coming to the US.

The White House, Department of Homeland Security and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) did not comment to

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Hawaii’s short-term vacation rental business is still showing signs of struggle since the recent lifting of the COVID ban

COVID-19 restrictions banning short-term vacation rentals just lifted on Oahu, which moved into Tier 2 of its economic reopening Thursday.

That means roughly 800 short-term vacation rental properties on Oahu, which had been sidelined by Honolulu Mayor Kirk Caldwell’s pandemic restrictions since April 7, are now allowed to resume business like their neighbor island counterparts.

Short-term rentals, which rented for 30 days or less and weren’t being used to quarantine guests, have been allowed to operate on Hawaii island and Kauai and in Maui County since the middle of June, when the state’s first pandemic-inspired interisland quarantine was lifted. That didn’t change even after Aug. 11, when a partial interisland quarantine was reinstated for the counties of Kauai, Hawaii, Maui and Kalawao.

Still, it’s not exactly been smooth sailing for vacation rentals statewide, which have suffered from a COVID-19-related plunge in travel demand just like hotels, airlines and any other member of Hawaii’s visitor industry.

Overall, travel demand in September was still depressed significantly by the requirement that all out-of-state passengers abide by a 14-day self-quarantine. It wasn’t until Oct. 15 that the state launched a pre-arrivals testing program that allows some travelers to bypass the quarantine.

Even before the pandemic, Oahu’s short-term rental industry was more restricted than in other counties. Honolulu allows short-term rental lodging only in resort and certain apartment-zoned districts, unless the property is one of the roughly 800 or so that were issued a nonconforming use certificate back in 1989 and have maintained it.

Ordinance 19-18, otherwise known as Bill 89, created means for the city to issue roughly 1,700 permits to allow bed-and-breakfast homes to operate. However, there’s a bill to push back the start date for permits to Jan. 31 because of the pandemic.

In September, Caldwell didn’t yet consider Oahu short-term rental as essential businesses. But the isle’s owners and suppliers realized the highest, albeit still low, September occupancy statewide.

According to a report released Friday by the Hawaii Tourism Authority, using data from Transparent Intelligence, Oahu’s vacation rental occupancy for September fell to 14.5%, a 59 percentage point drop from September 2019. Oahu’s vacation rental supply fell more than 56% to 97,989 units. Oahu’s demand dropped to 14,160 units, but the nearly 92% drop wasn’t quite as steep as that experienced by Maui or Kauai.

September occupancy at Maui County vacation rentals decreased 68.8 percentage points to 5.4%. Maui’s supply declined more than 48% to 151,521, and demand dropped more than 96%, the most of any island, to 8,151.

Kauai’s vacation rental occupancy fell 62.3 percentage points to 5.6%. Kauai’s supply fell nearly 49% to 62,133, while demand decreased nearly 96% to 3,500.

Hawaii island’s occupancy declined 49.2 percentage points to 10.7%. Hawaii island’s supply dropped about 57% to 89,813, and demand decreased more than 92% to 9,620.

Despite the economic devastation that tourism lockdowns have caused Hawaii’s vacation rental industry, not all Hawaii residents support allowing them to operate during the pandemic, especially since the the Honolulu Department of Planning

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