Tag: infection

Boy’s skinned knee leads to rare staph infection, loss of both legs

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Beauden Baumkirchner and his parents, Juliana and Brian. (Photo: Photo courtesy Juliana Baumkirchner)

SAN DIEGO – Three-year-old Beauden Baumkirchner is finally out of the pediatric intensive care unit — about two months after he skinned his knee on vacation in San Diego.

In that time, he has been battling a rare and “vicious” bacteria that cost him both his legs. One of his doctors says it’s a “miracle” the boy is still alive.

Beauden’s parents, Juliana and Brian Baumkirchner, have nearly lost track of the number of times their boy has gone under anesthesia — they say he has endured at least 18 surgeries since Oct. 5, when he fell off a bike and his condition rapidly deteriorated.

“It’s every parent’s worst nightmare when you’re completely helpless,” Brian told USA TODAY.

Beauden and his family were visiting California, on vacation from their home in Arizona, when the incident happened. 

Doctors don’t know where the staph bacteria that infected Beauden came from, Dr. John Bradley told USA TODAY. Bradley is the medical director of Rady Children’s Hospital’s Division of Infectious Diseases and was involved in Beauden’s treatment within days of the boy’s admission to the hospital.

But that skinned knee acted as a portal for the toxin-laced bacteria, which despite showing up in lab tests as a “garden-variety staph,” caused an illness similar to toxic shock syndrome in Beauden. 

The day after the fall, the boy had a fever, was acting lethargic and was holding his foot, his parents said. By the following day, he was having trouble breathing and his fever hadn’t subsided. His knee and lip were swollen.

He went to the hospital for an X-ray, which turned into an MRI. By that point, his feet were freezing cold and his hands were clearly infected as well.

That’s when he went to the ICU, where he spent nearly two months, his parents said.

For days, he fought for his life. He was intubated for over a week. Both his doctor and his parents have called what happened next “a miracle.”

“He wasn’t supposed to make it,” Brian said.

Bradley explained that Beauden had entered shock — his body had shut down blood flow to his arms and legs as it battled a “vicious strain” of bacteria. But the body was doing that to protect something more important, Bradley said: The “body’s defenses maintained blood flow to the brain.”

As a result, Beauden has had no neurological issues, Juliana said.

The infection that plagued Beauden is a troubling, complicated diagnosis.

When examined in a lab, it looks like MSSA — an easy-to-treat staph infection caused by bacteria commonly found on human skin, Bradley said. But further analysis shows it was laced with a toxin, something the bacteria could pick up by interacting with a virus or another bacteria.

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Bradley said it’s possible other people have been infected with the strain, so

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Don’t Travel To Mexico, Says CDC. (Yet Infection Rates Are Higher In Most Of The U.S.)

Thinking of getting away to Cancun or Cabo? The CDC is not mincing words.

“Travelers should avoid all travel to Mexico,” according to its latest guidance, which places Mexico in the Level 4 risk category, highest risk level for COVID-19.

Mind you, most countries around the world are now at Level 4, and the vast majority currently have much less community spread than the United States.

Yesterday, the United States recorded 180,083 new Covid-19 cases and 2,597 deaths, according to data from Johns Hopkins University. Meanwhile, Mexico recorded 8,819 and 825 deaths. Even if you adjust for population — the U.S. has 2.6 times as many people as Mexico — it would appear that north of the border is the riskier place to be right now.

You can get an apples-to-apples comparison by looking at incidence. Over a seven-day rolling average, the United States has recorded 48.2 new daily Covid-19 cases per 100,000 people, compared to 7.2 new cases per day per 100,000 people in Mexico, according to the risk-assessment map from the Harvard Global Health Institute and Brown School of Public Health.

MORE FROM FORBESCDC Now Says Travelers Should Get Three Covid Tests

Still, that’s not to imply that it is safe to go to Mexico at the moment, as most experts think Mexico’s actual numbers are higher because of low testing levels. On October 5, Mexican health authorities changed their tracking methodology and subsequently reported a sharp jump in Covid-19 cases and deaths, reported The New York Times. And on Monday, Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, the director-general of the World Health Organization confirmed that “Mexico is in bad shape.” 

The U.S.-Mexico land border is closed to nonessential travel by land until at least December 21. But air travel is another story. Americans can fly into Mexico and do not need to show proof of a negative test or undergo quarantine. And airlines have been adding flights for the upcoming winter season.

If you decide to travel to Mexico despite the Level 4 warning, the CDC says you should get three separate Covid-19 tests. The agency now recommends that all international travelers get a viral test for Covid-19 at three different times — before, during and after their trip.

MORE FROM FORBES‘Any Type Of Travel Needs To Stop,’ Says Top Critical Care Pulmonologist

Here in the United States, coronavirus is spreading like wildfire across the country, with a giant hot spot covering Mountain West and Midwest.

The White House coronavirus task force has warned that Covid-19 risk nationwide is “at a historic high.”

“If you look across the United States, we are really in a public health crisis right now because we are having a surge the likes of which is worse than the surges that we

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Delta launches the first quarantine-free travel from the US to Europe, thanks to a new testing program that reduces infection chances on a flight to ‘1 in a million’



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  • Delta is trialing a new testing program that will allow passengers to travel to Europe without quarantine.
  • The airline is piloting the scheme on flights between Rome and Atlanta from December alongside Italian airline Alitalia.
  • Passengers will have to take two COVID-19 tests before boarding the plane in the US, and another one upon arrival in Italy.
  • If the Delta flights are 60% full and the tests are combined with other protective measures, the risk of COVID-19 infection “should be nearly one in a million,” the Mayo Clinic said.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Delta Air Lines will allow passengers to skip one of the major hurdles associated with travel to Europe during the pandemic – quarantine – because of a new testing program it is launching on flights between Rome and Atlanta, Georgia.

From December 19, US citizens who are permitted to travel to Italy for essential reasons, including for work, health and education, as well as all EU and Italian citizens flying from the US, won’t have to quarantine when they arrive in the country if they take part in the program, it announced Thursday. 

To board the flights, operated by both Delta and Italian airline Alitalia, passengers must produce a negative COVID-19 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test taken up to 72 hours before departure, alongside a rapid test administered at the airport in Atlanta before boarding.

Upon arrival in Rome, they will have to take a second rapid test.

To return to Atlanta, passengers will also need to take a rapid test at the airport in Rome.

They will need to provide details to support the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s contact-tracing protocols, the airline said.

Video: International travelers may soon be required to get COVID-19 vaccination before flying (USA TODAY)

International travelers may soon be required to get COVID-19 vaccination before flying

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The program is pending an upcoming decree that Delta expects the Italian government to issue.

It applies to flights between Aeroporti di Roma in Rome, Italy and Georgia’s Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport.

Read more: There are 12 coronavirus tests you can use from home. Here’s how they work and where to order one.

Advisors from the Mayo Clinic have reviewed Delta’s testing program. When the testing protocols are combined with other protective measures including mask requirements, proper social distancing, and environmental cleaning, “we can predict that the risk of COVID-19 infection – on a flight that is 60% full – should be nearly one in a million,” Henry Ting, chief value officer at the Mayo Clinic, said.

“Carefully designed COVID-19 testing protocols are the best path for resuming international travel safely and without quarantine until vaccinations are widely in place,” Steve Sear, president of Delta’s international operations, said.

This week, five other airlines, including Virgin Atlantic and United Airlines, announced that they would roll out shared digital health passes to prove negative COVID-19 tests in December.

The

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San Diego boy’s legs amputated after developing MSSA staph infection on family vacation

SAN DIEGO, California — What a family thought was a minor scrape on a bike ride turned into a heartbreaking situation for a 3-year-old boy in San Diego.

“He fell down, scratched his knee. We put antibacterial spray and a band aid, and out we went,” Brian Baumkirschner, the 3-year-old’s father recalled.

Brian says little Beauden spent the next few hours riding bikes, running around and at one point, playing in the dirt.

“Just before 6 p.m. he said, ‘My tummy hurts. Is it bedtime?'” Brian told KGTV.

The next morning, Beauden woke up with a fever and eventually started favoring his right leg, where he had scraped his knee area.

When he became lethargic the next day, his parents rushed him to urgent care, and then Rady Children’s Hospital.

RELATED: Quadruple amputee mom learns how to drive again

Brian says his son’s right knee was swelling up and turned purple.

“It started spreading up his legs, arms, down to this hands,” Brian recalled.

Brian says doctors eventually diagnosed Beauden with a MRSA staph infection.

“They kept telling us, ‘There’s swelling. All of his extremities are shutting down,'” Brian said.

Beauden had developed a complication, toxic shock syndrome. His little body started to shut down.

He then developed sepsis, and his kidneys started to fail.

SEE ALSO: When will a COVID-19 vaccine be available for kids and will it be safe?

“Every parent’s worst nightmare,” Brian said. “You can’t do anything. You’re helpless.”

Several leg surgeries to relieve the pressure helped save Beauden’s life.

But on Monday, doctors had to amputate his legs below the knee.

Brian is optimistic Beauden’s arms and hands can be saved. He says he’s just grateful is son is alive after their fun vacation turned tragic.

“We’re still so numb, just heartbreaking,” Brian said.

The family has set up a GoFundMe to cover some of Beauden’s medical expenses.

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China Bans Travel From U.K., India And Other Countries With Higher Coronavirus Infection Rates

Topline

China, the country where the coronavirus pandemic is believed to have begun late last year, put in place new temporary bans on travelers coming from a handful of countries still struggling to curb the spread of the virus within their borders.

Key Facts

According to Reuters, countries affected by the new regulations include the U.K., France, Belgium, India and the Philippines.

The U.K. and France have both detected a spike in coronavirus deaths this week that rivals the figures counted in the springtime along with surges in hospitalizations related to the virus, while Belgium is the European country with the most new cases per capita.

India ranks second worldwide in terms of total confirmed cases and third in deaths attributed to the virus according to Johns Hopkins University data.

The Philippines is battling Southeast Asia’s second-worst coronavirus outbreak, though with just more than 1,500 new cases confirmed Thursday, it appears to be much better off than the other nations barred by China.

Affected travelers will include all non-Chinese citizens, even those with long-term residency permits according to media reports, but the Chinese embassy in London said emergency visas may be applied for by nationals of other countries.

The U.S. does not appear to fall under the ban, though it has one of the fastest-growing coronavirus infection rates in the world and is the worst affected in terms of confirmed cases and deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University.

Crucial Quote

“China has referred to the practices of many countries and adjusted its approach to relevant people coming to China based on changes in the pandemic situation,” CNN quoted Wang Wenbin, China’s foreign ministry spokesman, as saying. “This is reasonable and consistent with international practice, and I believe people can understand it.”

Key Background

The coronavirus pandemic is believed to have originated in Wuhan, a city in China. While China was the first country to battle the virus, it has reportedly largely contained the spread as it has reported only double-digit new daily coronavirus case figures for months, while other nations count tens of thousands. According to Johns Hopkins University, China has reported just more than 91,000 total cases and less than 5,000 deaths, though some have questioned the country’s self-reported figures.

Further Reading

In COVID clampdown, China bars travellers from Britain, France, India (Reuters)

China will ban travelers from Belgium, India, the Philippines and the UK in response to Covid-19 (CNN)

France And United Kingdom Report Most Covid Deaths Since Spring (Forbes)

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San Diego boy’s legs amputated after developing MRSA staph infection on family vacation

SAN DIEGO, California — What a family thought was a minor scrape on a bike ride turned into a heartbreaking situation for a 3-year-old boy in San Diego.

“He fell down, scratched his knee. We put antibacterial spray and a band aid, and out we went,” Brian Baumkirschner, the 3-year-old’s father recalled.

Brian says little Beauden spent the next few hours riding bikes, running around and at one point, playing in the dirt.

“Just before 6 p.m. he said, ‘My tummy hurts. Is it bedtime?'” Brian told KGTV.

The next morning, Beauden woke up with a fever and eventually started favoring his right leg, where he had scraped his knee area.

When he became lethargic the next day, his parents rushed him to urgent care, and then Rady Children’s Hospital.

RELATED: Quadruple amputee mom learns how to drive again

Brian says his son’s right knee was swelling up and turned purple.

“It started spreading up his legs, arms, down to this hands,” Brian recalled.

Brian says doctors eventually diagnosed Beauden with a MRSA staph infection.

“They kept telling us, ‘There’s swelling. All of his extremities are shutting down,'” Brian said.

Beauden had developed a complication, toxic shock syndrome. His little body started to shut down.

He then developed sepsis, and his kidneys started to fail.

SEE ALSO: When will a COVID-19 vaccine be available for kids and will it be safe?

“Every parent’s worst nightmare,” Brian said. “You can’t do anything. You’re helpless.”

Several leg surgeries to relieve the pressure helped save Beauden’s life.

But on Monday, doctors had to amputate his legs below the knee.

Brian is optimistic Beauden’s arms and hands can be saved. He says he’s just grateful is son is alive after their fun vacation turned tragic.

“We’re still so numb, just heartbreaking,” Brian said.

The family has set up a GoFundMe to cover some of Beauden’s medical expenses.

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Blood glucose test, HIV infection risk for hotel quarantine guests

More than 200 people who underwent hotel quarantine in Victoria have been urged to go get tested for HIV and other viruses after a testing stuff up resulted in possible cross-contamination.

Safer Care Victoria announced yesterday that 243 people who underwent blood glucose level tests while in coronavirus hotel quarantine between March 29 and August 20 could be at risk of contracting a blood borne virus after the same test was used on multiple people.

“Blood glucose level testing devices intended for use by one person were used across multiple residents,” Safer Care Victoria said in a statement.

“This presents a low clinical risk of cross-contamination and blood borne viruses – Hepatitis B and C, and HIV.”

A blood glucose level test involves pricking a finger to get a drop of blood to be used in the testing device.

RELATED: Follow our latest coronavirus updates

CEO Safer Care Victoria Adj Assoc Prof Ann Maree Keenan said the agency was conducting a review to figure out how the stuff-up occurred.

“The health of past quarantine residents is our immediate concern, so arranging screening for them is our absolute priority. The clinical risk is low. But if you are at all worried you had this test – and we have not contacted you yet – please call us,” Prof Keenan said.

“Right now, we won’t be able to answer the many questions people will have about how this happened. Be assured that Safer Care Victoria is conducting a full review into how and why this device came to be in use.

“I hope that we will be able to bring peace of mind through getting people in for testing, and through the findings of our review.”

If anyone is concerned they had this test but have not yet been contacted they can call the Safer Care Patient line on 1800 356 061.

RELATED: 1.7 million lost Aussies due to COVID

Former Labor leader Bill Shorten weighed in on Victoria’s latest hotel quarantine stuff-up.

Speaking on the Today show on Tuesday, Mr Shorten said the mistakes occurring in Victoria “are not good enough”.

Mr Shorten said this was a timely reminder that people still needed to “keep our guard up against the old nasties we know about”.

“It must be really stressful and worrying for the people who have gone through this. I hope that they can get the tests results back as quick as possible,” he said.

Health Minister Martin Foley addressed the testing stuff-up at a press conference this morning, clarifying that the needles used in the test were changed between each use by the device was not changed, despite it being meant for repeated used by one person, not multiple people.

“I need to stress that this is, according to all the clinical advice, a very, very low risk of cross contamination but, out of an abundance of caution, Safer Care Victoria and the Alfred Hospital are doing precisely the right thing in a very risk-averse way of seeking to

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India Infection Peak Seen; Green Lane Travel: Virus Update

(Bloomberg) — European leaders intensified efforts to tamp down surging infections, with Ireland enacting severe restrictions. Soaring cases in U.S. battleground states pose a challenge for President Donald Trump two weeks before the election.

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India has already seen a peak in the number of new infections and may be able to contain the world’s second-largest outbreak by February, according to a government panel of scientists. The Philippines shortened curfew hours in Manila and eased the stay-at-home order to further reopen its economy.

Discussions to open up travel for business purposes continue to take place in Asia, with the governments of Japan and China reportedly close to an agreement to resume business travel between the countries as soon as this week.

Key Developments:

Global Tracker: Cases top 40.2 million; deaths exceed 1.1 millionSee the latest on the race for a vaccine with Bloomberg’s trackerTrading floors are full and masks are off in post-Covid ShanghaiFear of job loss haunt half the world’s workers as crisis ragesCDC issues ‘strong’ call for masks on U.S. airplanes, trainsHow do people catch Covid-19? Here’s what experts say: QuickTake

Subscribe to a daily update on the virus from Bloomberg’s Prognosis team here. Click CVID on the terminal for global data on coronavirus cases and deaths.



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Japan, China Near Agreement to Resume Business Travel (7:29 a.m. HK)

The governments of Japan and China will agree to resume business travel between the countries as soon as this week, Yomiuri reports, citing an unidentified Japanese government official.

Those planning long stays will be required to undergo 14 day quarantine, but will be exempt for short stays provided certain conditions are met

Texas Hospitals Strain to Cope in Newest Hotspots (7:27 a.m. HK)

Almost one-fourth of all hospital beds in the El Paso, Texas, area are occupied by virus patients and the region with almost 1 million residents has just 16 intensive-care beds available, state health department data showed.

In the state’s newest hotspots of El Paso, Lubbock, Amarillo and Laredo, hospitals’ virus loads are approaching or already above the 15% threshhold set forth by Governor Greg Abbott for emergency status.

Meanwhile, data lags continue to dog efforts to track the trajectory of the outbreak in the second-largest US state. On Monday, the state disclosed 2,440 previously uncounted cases, a tally which outnumbered the actual figure for new daily detections by more than 7%.

CDC Urges Masks While on Transit (6:41 a.m. HK)

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued a “strong recommendation” for mask-wearing by both passengers and operators on planes, trains, buses and taxis to prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

Masks should cover a person’s nose and mouth and be worn while traveling in and out of the U.S. as well as within the country, the agency said. Operators should require them for the entire time of travel and deny entry to anyone not wearing one.

The change was reported earlier by the Washington Post, which said it followed airline industry

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Kauai confirms coronavirus case related to inter-island travel; second infection probable

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                                Kauai officials said today that the island has one new confirmed coronavirus case and a second probable infection that is pending laboratory results.

    STAR-ADVERTISER / APRIL 4

    Kauai officials said today that the island has one new confirmed coronavirus case and a second probable infection that is pending laboratory results.

Kauai officials said this morning that the island has one new confirmed coronavirus case and a second probable infection that is pending laboratory results.

The Kauai District Health Office said the confirmed case is related to inter-island travel while the probable case is a household contact.

Both people are in isolation and all close contacts of the two infected individuals have been directed to quarantine and offered testing, officials said.

If both cases are confirmed by the state, Kauai’s total number of cases since the start of the pandemic would increase to 61. The state Department of Health’s official coronavirus tally for the island has remained at 59 all month.

“While pre- and post-travel testing can provide an additional layer of protection, a quarantine is always the safest option,” said Mayor Derek S.K. Kawakami in a news release. “Travelers now have the option to test out of quarantine, but it is still advised that you keep your distance from others as much as possible for 14 days after travel.”

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