Tag: Indoor

City Suspends Indoor Recreation Due To Rise In Covid-19 Cases

Oakland’s Town Camp Enrichment Program is being suspended because of the COVID-19 pandemic, city officials announced Thursday.

The program provides indoor recreation to school-age youth from kindergarten through fifth grade. Outdoor youth programs, senior programs, library services and homeless services will still be provided, according to city officials.

According to Alameda County, 10,884 cases of the coronavirus have been reported in Oakland as of Thursday. City officials said the recent spike in virus cases and possibly a further increase because of family holiday gatherings were behind the decision to suspend the enrichment program.

“We realize that this will be a burden on some families,” city officials said. “However, we feel it is gravely necessary for us to play our part to control the spread of COVID-19, for both the customers we serve AND our own staff and their families.”

In-person enrichment programs were provided during the summer and at recreation centers since the beginning of the school year.


“We will continue following Alameda County Public Health guidelines and protocols over the next few weeks and will communicate when we feel we can safely resume indoor programming,” city officials said.

Head Start in Oakland remains open for in-person as well as virtual services but will have an extended winter break in anticipation of the increase in coronavirus cases.

Head Start locations will be closed from Dec. 21 through Jan. 8 and open again on Jan. 11. Families will be served virtually during the winter break.

Senior centers are not open for in-person services but are delivering food and making it available for pickup as well as providing virtual classes and information and referral services. More information can be found at https://www.oaklandca.gov/topics/senior-services.

Housing services for homeless residents remain in operation. Anyone interested in providing food or supplies to help homeless residents is encouraged to work with a provider of those services to reduce the risk of exposing homeless residents to the coronavirus.

Sidewalk library services continue to be provided at 16 locations during limited hours while indoor areas will stay closed to the public.

Library materials can be returned at outdoor bookdrops. The materials are quarantined for 96 hours before they are checked in.

Oakland Public Library reference librarians can be reached by calling (510) 238-3134 or by email at [email protected]

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Indoor recreation sites say operations crucial for well-being this winter

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Operators of places for indoor activity impacted by the governor’s COVID-19 regulations say their operations are essential for the physical and mental well being of the public.

Craig Rhodes, a managing partner for Kingpin Lanes in Springfield, said they were closed during the lockdown this spring, allowed to open for a few months and then closed down again.

“A, we’re in the league bowling season which is the best season for us and going into the holidays where we pick up quite a bit of extra income and foot traffic for the holidays which is not just difficult, but difficult timing as well,” Rhodes said.

Gov. J.B. Pritzker has imposed prohibitions on indoor service at bars and restaurants statewide, and capacity limits on retail operations. Indoor recreation, like bowling, is prohibited.



Rhodes said he’ll be keeping a close eye on the numbers, and if there aren’t declines from all the closures, there need to be some explanations.

“If there’s no change and everyone’s closed, obviously there’s something else if afoot,” he said. “We would certainly demand to have some answers based on those numbers.”


Rhodes said while some don’t consider bowling essential, it is to his employees and to his clientele’s physical and mental well being.

For gyms, there can’t be any group exercises and locker rooms are closed under the governor’s rules. In Springfield, FitBodies owner Chris Schmulbach said he’s gone from group classes to open gym. He also said he doesn’t recommend masks.


“I can’t force them to wear masks, so I guess I’ll take the heat and deal with it from there and see what happens,” Schmulbach said.

Corynne Cooper, the general manager of a fitness facility in Chicago, will be following the guidelines to the letter.

“If [Pritzker] says masks, it is masks,” Cooper said. “If it’s not steam rooms and saunas, it’s no steam rooms and saunas. If it’s no locker rooms, it’s not locker rooms. We’re not trying to cut any corners.”

Both said keeping their facilities open is crucial to the physical and mental health of their clients.

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Indoor recreation businesses say they’re crucial for mental, physical well-being | Coronavirus

Operators of places for indoor activity impacted by the governor’s COVID-19 regulations say their operations are essential for the physical and mental well being of the public.

Craig Rhodes, a managing partner for Kingpin Lanes in Springfield, said they were closed during the lockdown this spring, allowed to open for a few months and then closed down again.

“A, we’re in the league bowling season which is the best season for us and going into the holidays where we pick up quite a bit of extra income and foot traffic for the holidays which is not just difficult, but difficult timing as well,” Rhodes said.

Gov. J.B. Pritzker last Monday imposed prohibitions on indoor service at bars and restaurants statewide, and capacity limits on retail operations. Indoor recreation, like bowling, is prohibited.

Rhodes said he’ll be keeping a close eye on the numbers, and if there aren’t declines from all the closures, there need to be some explanations.

“If there’s no change and everyone’s closed, obviously there’s something else if afoot,” he said. “We would certainly demand to have some answers based on those numbers.”

Rhodes said while some don’t consider bowling essential, it is to his employees and to his clientele’s physical and mental well being.

For gyms, there can’t be any group exercises and locker rooms are closed under the governor’s rules. In Springfield, FitBodies owner Chris Schmulbach said he’s gone from group classes to open gym. He also said he doesn’t recommend masks.

“I can’t force them to wear masks, so I guess I’ll take the heat and deal with it from there and see what happens,” Schmulbach said.

Corynne Cooper, the general manager of a fitness facility in Chicago, will be following the guidelines to the letter.

“If [Pritzker] says masks, it is masks,” Cooper said. “If it’s not steam rooms and saunas, it’s no steam rooms and saunas. If it’s no locker rooms, it’s not locker rooms. We’re not trying to cut any corners.”

Both said keeping their facilities open is crucial to the physical and mental health of their clients.

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Hennepin County allots $5 million for indoor recreation facilities including gyms, entertainment venues

Hennepin County officials allotted $5 million Friday for locally-owned gyms, fitness facilities, and other indoor recreation and entertainment venues with up to 50 employees that will be affected by COVID-19 restrictions.

Businesses eligible for $15,000 grants include climbing facilities, trampoline parks, theaters, cinemas, concert halls, museums, stadiums, arcades, bowling alleys and martial arts, dance and exercise studios. The application deadline is noon on Dec. 2.

Gov. Tim Walz this week ordered bars, restaurants, gyms and entertainment venues to close Saturday through Dec. 18. The County Board on Wednesday approved $8 million for bars and restaurants.

To be eligible for relief funding, a business must be a fixed, permanent commercial establishment in good standing with the Minnesota Secretary of State and current on property tax payments. If a business has multiple locations, it can receive up to three additional grants.

County officials learned this week from the state’s Department of Economic Development that restaurant employment in Hennepin County, before this week’s restrictions, was down 48.7% compared to this time last year. That reflects a loss of 25,912 jobs in the county.

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Illinois COVID 19 restrictions: Bowling alleys, indoor recreation, face second full shutdown

CHICAGO (WLS) — New statewide COVID-19 mitigation starts Friday, and will shutter indoor dining in restaurants, cut capacity in retail stores, and shut down indoor recreational activities including bowling. Owners tell ABC 7 they don’t know how long they’ll be able to survive.

“My grandfather and his brother built Waveland Bowl in 1959, so I’m third generation. My kids both work here. It’s all I’ve done my entire life,” said Waveland Bowl President Gary Handler.

The lanes, the pins, to Handler, they’re home.

“In my 40 years, I’ve been through a lot of catastrophes and recessions but nothing has ever compared in any way or form to this,” Handler said.

That home is turning to heartbreak. Handler is staring down the lane at another state mandated COVID-19 shutdown for his business. The first one lasted for four months, and right now there are no guarantees.

“I’m not angry. I’m sad. It’s hard, we got 40 people who rely on this place. Forty families that are going to be going back on unemployment. Me too,” Handler said. “There’s only so long that even a healthy, profitable business like Waveland Bowl is going to be able to survive.”

Handler said he’s not trying to spare his bowling alley from the shutdown, but he’s asking for your support once they reopen.

“That crunch you know, I love it. I live for it,” said high school bowler Jamie Elliott. That support is something he is eager to give.

“I just think that everyone in every community should work together to keep these places alive,” Elliott said.

But uncertainty is also felt a few blocks over at Timber Lanes Bowling Alley.

“This is not the way I ever wanted to end it. I’m 65 years old. I’m at the point of retirement, but I’m not ready to retire yet,” said proprietor Robert Kuhn. “I still want to be involved in this business. It’s hard.”

Kuhn said his business is solid financially for now, but at some point, they’ll need to make a tough decision.

“We can’t even think about what we’re going to do in the future because we don’t know,” he said. “It just gets depressing. You know, you come in here and there’s nobody here.”

Copyright © 2020 WLS-TV. All Rights Reserved.

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Ann Arbor closing city hall, indoor recreation facilities amid surge in COVID-19 cases

ANN ARBOR, MI — In response to the surge in COVID-19 cases and the state’s new emergency order temporarily shuttering certain workplaces, Ann Arbor is closing city hall again and making changes to city operations.

“We are planning to close city hall to the public starting Wednesday for the duration of the three-week period or pause,” City Administrator Tom Crawford said. “During that time, we will continue our services online, by mail and by phone.”

Residents will be able to access pretty much all the city services they need in those ways, Crawford said Monday night, Nov. 16, announcing the changes to City Council.

“We’re also closing all of our indoor recreation facilities,” he said.

Essential city services will continue, Crawford said.

“You know, the police, fire, water, storm, refuse collection — all of that will continue,” he said.

All the latest on the coronavirus in Michigan: Tuesday, Nov. 17

With COVID-19 cases surging, the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services issued the new emergency order Sunday. It’s described as a three-week pause to save lives, targeting indoor gatherings.

“Right now, there are thousands of cases a day and hundreds of deaths a week in Michigan, and the number is growing,” Gov. Gretchen Whitmer said in a statement. “If we don’t act now, thousands more will die, and our hospitals will continue to be overwhelmed. We can get through this together by listening to health experts once again and taking action right now to slow the spread of this deadly virus.”

Workplaces, when work can be done from home, are not to be open while the order is in effect.

Michigan lists 260 new coronavirus outbreaks and 723 ongoing clusters in Nov. 16 report

“Our employees are moving to mandated telecommuting service if they’re able to for their job,” Crawford said. “Obviously we have a number of employees who that doesn’t apply to, but if they can, they will be.”

City staff will continue to support the city’s boards and commissions, which have been meeting virtually, but some of the work they request “may be delayed a bit as we go through this time of stretched capabilities,” Crawford said.

City hall was closed to the public for nearly three months after the coronavirus pandemic hit in March. It reopened in June with new mask requirements and other safety protocols.

Officials issue open letter after significant rise of COVID-19 cases in Washtenaw County

As of 11 a.m. Monday, there were 140 more confirmed COVID-19 cases among county residents in the last 24 hours, the Washtenaw County Health Department reported.

There also were 1,237 cases locally, including three deaths, during a two-week period from Oct. 29 to Nov. 11, according to the department. The number of confirmed and probable cases among county residents is now up to 7,859, including 560 hospitalizations and 128 deaths.

COVID-19 case trends in Washtenaw County

COVID-19 case trends in Washtenaw County.Washtenaw County Health Department

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University of Michigan, Michigan State accelerate plans for online learning due

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Oregon banning select indoor recreation for two weeks amid pandemic surge

Oregon Gov. Kate Brown announced on Friday she is placing a two-week moratorium on recreational activities as COVID-19 spreads throughout the state.

The statewide moratorium takes effect on November 18 and lasts through December 2.

It effectively limits bars and restaurants to take-out service only while gyms, movie theaters, business offices, and museums will be shut down.

Grocery and retail stores are capped at 75% capacity and Brown said curbside pickup service is encouraged.

Indoor worship services are also capped at 25 people and 50 people when outdoors.

Visits to nursing homes will also end on Wednesday along with outdoor recreational areas like zoos and gardens.

Social interactions, indoors or otherwise, are now limited to six people from two households.

Brown said Multnomah County will be under the guidelines for up to four weeks, and other high-risk regions will likely face longer restrictions.

The two-week moratorium shares many of the restrictions included in Brown’s stay-at-home order from this past March.

This time, the governor is choosing to keep hair salons, barber shops, and massage parlors open in counties that are in Phase 1 of reopening.

Elementary schools, higher education, and childcare services will see no changes under the order. City parks and playgrounds will also remain open.

Oregon authorities have largely delegated enforcing public safety to the public, although businesses can and have faced penalties for shirking health guidelines.

Brown has largely avoided issuing another stay-at-home order much like Gov. Jay Inslee up north in Washington state. Her orders on Friday come as close as the state has been in recent months to a full lockdown.

The state has been setting new records for daily cases for the past week.

The Oregon Health Authority reported 1,122 new cases on Thursday alone and the first time new daily cases counts have surpassed 1,000.

On Friday, the agency reported 1,076 new cases and seven more deaths from the virus.

State officials say colder weather is likely bringing people indoors for social gatherings.

OHSA has already received more than 11,000 complaints related to pandemic workplace safety since March, though few resulted in citations.

On Friday, state epidemiologist Dr. Dean Sidelinger said the spread of the pandemic boils down to social gatherings—a talking point pushed by the Oregon Restaurant and Lodging Association.

ORLA, a longtime critic of the state health orders, called on Brown in a letter released on Friday to extend the commercial eviction moratorium and $75 million in industry relief.

“We were already hearing from members they were concerned about what another shutdown would do to their chances of staying open,” said ORLA CEO and President Jason Brandt. “This latest round of regulations focused on restaurants will trigger an unknown amount of permanent closures impacting the livelihoods of thousands of Oregon families.”

The statewide commercial and eviction moratorium goes through the end of the year.

The state has now seen 746 deaths from COVID-19 and 53,779 total since the state reported its very first COVID-19 case on February 28.

Oregon Health

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Amid pandemic, Hotel Bethlehem requiring reservations to view elaborate indoor Christmas decorations

Following in the footsteps of other Lehigh Valley Christmas attractions, including Christkindlmarkt and the Lehigh Valley Zoo’s Winter Light Spectactular, the elaborately decorated Hotel Bethlehem is adapting to the coronavirus pandemic.



a view of a city at night: Due to the coronavirus pandemic, Hotel Bethlehem is expected to be completely decorated for Christmas before Thanksgiving. All guests will be required to have a reservation in order to enter the hotel and view the elaborate decorations in the lobby, dining rooms and other areas.


© Photo courtesy of Hotel Bethlehem/Contributed Photo/Hotel Bethlehe/The Morning Call/TNS
Due to the coronavirus pandemic, Hotel Bethlehem is expected to be completely decorated for Christmas before Thanksgiving. All guests will be required to have a reservation in order to enter the hotel and view the elaborate decorations in the lobby, dining rooms and other areas.

The 437 Main St. hotel, which earned the No. 2 spot on USA Today’s 10Best 2020 Readers Choice Awards list for “Best Historic Hotel.” is expected to be completely decorated for Christmas before Thanksgiving this year to accommodate guests coming in early for the Christmas season, according to a news release.

Management felt it was necessary to kick off the holiday season early like ArtsQuest and the Downtown Bethlehem Association have done with their outdoor Christmas markets.

The hotel, a member of the Historic Hotels of America, part of the National Trust for Historic Preservation, is professionally decorated by designers Gary Berger and Robert Averill, who have decorated the hotel lobby, restaurants, grand ballroom, meeting spaces, and exterior of the hotel for the past 15 years.

This year will be no different for them, except they must start early and move at “super-elf” speed to finish the enormous task by mid-November, according to the release.

Together, the pair designs the elaborate displays that highlight the hotel’s ornate architecture, while working with the hotel’s engineering staff to organize their set-up.

“We have always sought to make Christmas at the hotel a truly magical experience for visitors to Bethlehem,” Bruice Haines, managing partner of Hotel Bethlehem, said in the release. “This year will be more challenging to manage this annual experience.”

Due to the pandemic, the hotel will require all guests to have a reservation before entering the hotel in order to “help the staff and the management team manage the crowds” during the hotel’s busiest season, according to the release.

In past years, the hotel would have opened its doors to thousands of guests per day to view their decorations, dine with them or enjoy cocktails in their grand lobby. Unfortunately, that will not be the case in 2020.

If locals or guests visiting Bethlehem wish to view the striking decorations throughout the hotel, they must make a reservation in advance on EventBrite for a self-guided tour. Tours are limited and early reservations are strongly encouraged.

“The primary purpose for reservations this year is to ensure the safety of our staff and hotel guests,” Dennis Costello, Hotel Bethlehem’s general manager, said in the release. “This means taking a proactive role to better control the flow of visitors in our lobby and throughout the hotel. It is not our intention to preclude from experiencing our decorations but this action is a necessary one this Christmas season.”

Hotel guests are also encouraged to make dining reservations in

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Madison Beach Hotel gets air purification for safe indoor dining

REME HALO air purifiers are located within the ducts of the restaurant’s HVAC system and silently kill 99% of bacteria, mold, and viruses. With ionized hydro-peroxide output and an enhanced catalyst with zinc, the system purifies every cubic inch of air that HVAC system reaches.

Invented to recreate nature’s process of purifying the air, the REME HALO air purifier simulates bringing fresh outdoor air inside without open windows. It is effective against all three categories of indoor air pollutants: particulates, microbial and gases.

In addition to the new air purifiers, Madison Beach Hotel is employing vigorous COVID-19 sanitation protocols to ensure the safety of guests and staff.

The hotel has fully implemented Hilton’s CleanStay program, developed in partnership with RB, maker of trusted home and industrial cleaning brands Lysol and Dettol with over 200 years of cutting-edge science and research in human health products.

The program includes focus on extra sanitization of 10 high-touch areas in guestrooms, elimination of multi-use products in-room, sealed and sanitized items for guest use (remote, coffee products, hairdryer), and increased frequency of cleaning all public space areas, including elevators and lobby.

An electrostatic sprayer is used in public spaces and guest rooms. The sprayer works by charging liquid chemicals as they pass through a sprayer nozzle. This generates charged droplets that repel against one another and stick to surfaces for effective disinfection.

Valet parking is now optional and self-parking of vehicles is welcome.

Madison Beach Hotel offer touchless check-in and guestroom access via the Hilton Honors app with advance check-in. Glass partitions are in place at Check-in and there are signage reminders to social distance throughout the property. Guest access has been streamlined in single way entry and exit points. Capacities are limited in elevators and public restrooms.

Masks are mandated for all staff and patrons, due to state regulations, and Hilton mandates for all U.S. properties to ensure consistent safety. The hotel is providing masks for guests that arrive without facial coverings.

Madison Beach Hotel is located at 94 West Wharf Road, Madison, Connecticut. For more information and to check availability for your upcoming event, please call our sales office 203-361-9345 or visit Madison Beach Hotel, Curio Collection by Hilton. For more information on Curio Collection by Hilton, please visit newsroom.hilton.com/curio.

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About Madison Beach Hotel

Madison Beach Hotel is a AAA Four Diamond Award-winning boutique resort and was chosen as Hotel of the Year by Hilton, the highest hotel award across all Hilton brands. The hotel, with 32 rooms offering luxurious accommodations with sweeping ocean views, private balconies, and beach, is part of Curio – A Collection by Hilton. Opened in May 2012, Madison Beach Hotel features The Wharf Restaurant with both dining room and porch seating, concierge spa, state-of-the-art fitness center and private yoga studio, and more than 5,000 square feet of private event space. Madison Beach Hotel is managed by Distinctive Hospitality Group.

Located at 94 West Wharf Road, Madison, Connecticut. For more information, please call: 203-245-1404 or visit:

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Centerville outdoor recreation business seeks indoor archery range approval in office area

CENTERVILLE – A Centerville outdoor recreation business is seeking approval for an indoor archery range in an office district.



a person wearing a costume: A Centerville archery business is seeking approval to operate an indoor range. FILE


© FILE
A Centerville archery business is seeking approval to operate an indoor range. FILE

City administrators are proposing changes to allow FAS Outdoor Company to have an indoor range for bow and arrow shooting at its 6560 Centerville Business Parkway site, an area not permitted for such use.

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The city is proposing to expand its municipal code, adding a section on the discharging of bows and arrows, currently mentioned in a section on firearms.

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The current code’s prohibition of indoor archery does not apply a “retail sporting goods supplier,” where the “archery range makes up less than 5% of the gross retail space,” Centerville records show.

Cabela’s in the Cornerstone development near Interstate 675 falls under this exception, according to the city.

FAS is also seeking a conditional use to have an archery range in an office planned development district, an area where such facilities are prohibited, Centerville City Planner Mark Yandrick said.

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