Tag: hospital

Mental health hospital suspends staff vacation due to COVID cases

A state-run psychiatric hospital in Rhode Island has suspended all medical staff vacation in response to a rising number of coronavirus cases among patients and workers.

“We regretfully are canceling all direct care patient support vacations” effective midnight Nov. 25, according to a letter to Eleanor Slater Hospital staff, The Providence Journal reported.

The letter also said, “We hope this vacation hold is temporary as we recognize the hard work and dedication of our staff and the need for time off.”

The letter was signed by Kathryn Power, director of the state Department of Behavioral Healthcare, Developmental Disabilities and Hospitals, which oversees the Cranston facility.

A Slater spokesperson earlier this week confirmed that 14 patients and 35 staffers had tested positive for the virus.

Another hospital group, Lifespan, previously issued an appeal for retired doctors and nurses to return to work, and even sought medical students and interns, to help relieve the medical staff shortage. Lifespan operates Rhode Island, Miriam, Hasbro Children’s and Newport hospitals.

There were 1,525 new confirmed cases of the coronavirus and 11 more virus-related fatalities in Rhode Island in the past two days, the state Department of Health reported Friday.

The department did not provide updated statistics on Thanksgiving Day, when most testing sites were closed because of the holiday.

The 7-day rolling average of daily new cases in Rhode Island has now risen over the past two weeks from more than 716 on Nov. 12 to almost 767 on Thursday, according to The COVID Tracking Project.

The 7-day rolling average of the positivity rate in Rhode Island was 5.89% on Thursday, down from over 6% two days prior, but still higher than it was two weeks ago.

State health departments are calculating positivity rate differently across the country, but for Rhode Island, the AP calculates the rate by dividing new cases by test encounters using data from The COVID Tracking Project.

The state’s death toll from the disease is now 1,346 patients.

The number of people in the state’s hospitals with the disease was down to 319 as of Wednesday, the latest day for which the data were available, the second consecutive day it has dropped. Of those, 37 are in intensive care.

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Public hospital suspends staff vacation due to virus cases

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — A state-run psychiatric hospital in Rhode Island has suspended all medical staff vacation in response to a rising number of coronavirus cases among patients and workers.

“We regretfully are canceling all direct care patient support vacations” effective midnight Nov. 25, according to a letter to Eleanor Slater Hospital staff, The Providence Journal reported.

The letter also said, “We hope this vacation hold is temporary as we recognize the hard work and dedication of our staff and the need for time off.”

The letter was signed by Kathryn Power, director of the state Department of Behavioral Healthcare, Developmental Disabilities and Hospitals, which oversees the Cranston facility.

A Slater spokesperson earlier this week confirmed that 14 patients and 35 staffers had tested positive for the virus.

Another hospital group, Lifespan, previously issued an appeal for retired doctors and nurses to return to work, and even sought medical students and interns, to help relieve the medical staff shortage. Lifespan operates Rhode Island, Miriam, Hasbro Children’s and Newport hospitals.

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Warning! These Holiday Travel Errors Could Land You In The Hospital

Holiday travel is downright dangerous this year. Earlier this week, the CDC warned Americans to stay home this Thanksgiving. All across the country, people are scrapping their itineraries and making a U-turn.

And for good reason. Some holiday travel errors could land you in the hospital — or worse. 

New COVID-19 cases shattering records, as my FORBES colleague Suzanne Kelleher recently noted. Many health experts are warning against all nonessential travel. But if you go — and I’m not saying you should — there are other errors you have to avoid. Because some holiday travel mistakes could kill you.

“Coronavirus is ruthless,” says Mahmood Khan, a professor at Virginia Tech, who directs the business school’s program in hospitality and tourism management. “Every trip that can be avoided will save suffering or even death.”

That’s worth repeating. Taking a trip might be your worst holiday travel mistake. If you can avoid traveling, do it.

Seriously.

Which travel errors could land you in the hospital?

But — and you knew there’d be a “but” — it’s been a long pandemic and many Americans have already made the decision to go somewhere for Thanksgiving, Christmas or New Year’s. It’s not their fault. They made their reservations late this summer, when things were still relatively safe.

So here we are, only days before one of the biggest travel holidays of the year. And people want to go, but they also want to come back alive. So which travel errors could land you in the hospital?

It turns out that following the oft-repeated travel advice, having the right attitude, choosing the right airline and hotel, and taking care of yourself can help keep you safe. Failing to do so could get you killed.

Don’t believe me? Here’s what experts say are the worst holiday travel mistakes. And a word of warning: this is not like past holiday travel advice stories. Far from it.

Not following advice is a travel mistake that could kill you

You know the advice because you’ve heard it a hundred times. “Wear a mask. Practice social distancing. Sanitize your hands frequently. Get a flu shot,” says Nikhil Agarwal, a lead physician at Wellmed, a healthcare provider. “Try to avoid places where the cases are on the rise and large crowded gatherings. “Agarwal says the biggest mistake people make is traveling if they feel sick. “If you are experiencing any kind of covid or flu-like symptoms, stay home,” he says.

Getting too comfortable

Travelers are on edge, and that may be a good thing, say experts like Alex Pollak, CEO of ParaDocs Worldwide, a medical services company. “When it comes to the mistakes that could be very detrimental to a traveler, one of the first that comes to mind is getting too comfortable,” he says. For example, falling asleep on a long-haul flight and removing your mask. “And then rubbing your eyes without remembering

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Coroner: Washington man shot at Boise hotel, died at hospital

The Ada County Coroner’s Office has identified a man shot and killed last month in Boise.

Gamaliel Nava Garzon, 42, of Kennewick, Washington, died in the emergency room of the Saint Alphonsus Regional Medical Center after he was shot inside a La Quinta Inn and Suites in Boise, according to a news release from the coroner’s office.

Police were called to the hotel in the 7000 block of Emerald Street and found Garzon before taking him to the hospital.

Hospital staffers attempted life-saving measures, but Garzon was pronounced dead about 1:30 a.m. on Oct. 30. He died from a single gunshot wound, and the death was ruled a homicide.

After Garzon’s death, Idaho police arrested Eava June-McCarthy, 18, of Nampa, on accusations of second-degree murder and destruction, alteration or concealment of evidence. Boise detectives believe that June-McCarthy and Garzon knew each other.

June-McCarthy’s preliminary court hearing is set for Nov. 20 in Boise. She has yet to enter a plea to either of her charges.

As of Friday, June-McCarthy was still in the custody of the Ada County jail on $2 million bail.

Related stories from Idaho Statesman

Jacob Scholl is a breaking news reporter for the Idaho Statesman. Before starting at the Statesman in March 2020, Jacob worked for newspapers in Missouri and Utah. He is a graduate of the University of Missouri.

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Miami hospital COVID nurses surprised with island vacation

Updated


MIAMI (AP) — Over a dozen Miami nurses and front line health care workers are finally getting a well-deserved break. The group was scheduled for an upcoming mandatory, aka boring, 48-hour training, but were instead surprised with an island vacation to the Florida Keys.

Jackson Health System supervisors were asked to choose staff that went above and beyond during the pandemic. Many of the staff, including respiratory therapists and lab techs, have not been able to take any time off during the pandemic to relax or spend time with their loved ones and have been working tirelessly during the pandemic treating COVID patients, the hospital said.


The 50 workers were told they had to attend a mandatory two-day, training, but when they gathered at the hospital Tuesday they were handed gift boxes with gift certificates.



Hawks Cay Resort in the Florida Keys donated two-night stays to their island on Duck Key, surrounded by sparkling waters and swaying palm trees as part of its Heroes Salute program.


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Transformation of former children’s polio hospital into resort hotel in the home stretch | Business

MILTON — A hospital built during the Great Depression to care for disabled children is on track to begin its new role as a resort hotel by this time next year, according to its developer.

“We should have the hotel open by the fall of next year, and our golf course ready to go next spring,” said Jeff Hoops, owner-developer of the Grand Patrician Resort, taking shape on the grounds of the former Morris Memorial Hospital for Crippled Children just east of Milton.

The former hospital is perched on a gently sloping 186-acre campus once used to graze dairy cattle and nourish an orchard that produced apples, pears and cherries for patients and staff.

Commuters on Interstate 64 about 1.5 miles east of the Milton exit can glance south of the freeway and see an army of more than 50 construction workers converting a portion of the former farmland into a golf course and transforming the 81-year-old hospital into a 109-room hotel.

Hoops, a resident of Milton, said the new inn will be affiliated with Wyndham Hotels. Each of the golf course’s nine holes is designed to replicate iconic holes at renowned courses from around the globe and will be equipped with artificial turf greens and tee areas.

Much of the new hotel is taking shape within the locally quarried blue-white limestone walls of the old hospital, built between 1936 and 1939.

The U-shaped building with Y-shaped wings provided 80,000 square feet of living quarters, classrooms and therapy space for its 120 residents — most of them victims of childhood polio. It was the largest public-works project built in West Virginia by the Works Progress Administration, a federal agency created as part of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal program.

First lady Eleanor Roosevelt, who visited the hospital in September 1939, wrote that the local laborers hired by the WPA to construct the facility had created “a monument of which they should well be proud,” and described a therapeutic swimming pool there as “the most delightful I have ever seen.”

More than 10,000 children received treatment at the hospital before an effective vaccine for polio became widely available in the 1950s, gradually making the hospital’s mission obsolete. The building closed as a children’s hospital in 1960, then reopened in 1961 as Morris Memorial Nursing Home, a geriatric facility. The building has been vacant since the nursing home ceased operations in 2009.

In 2017, Hoops and his wife, Patricia, entered an agreement with the city of Milton, which owns the property, to build the resort hotel on the site.

Since then, the building has been stabilized, cleared of asbestos and debris, upgraded to meet modern codes, fitted with new windows and roof tiles, and is now ready for drywalling. A new four-story portico is taking shape as part of a makeover of the main entrance to the building.

The hotel will include a 400-seat steakhouse restaurant, conference rooms, a 300-seat wedding chapel and a 500-seat ballroom, retail shops, two indoor

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Ratchaphruek Hospital Achieves GHA’s COVID-19 Certification of Conformance for Medical Travel

WEST PALM BEACH, Fla., Oct. 27, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Ratchaphruek Hospital (https://rph.co.th/en/), a top destination for medical travelers to Thailand, is the second hospital in Thailand and the third hospital in the world to be awarded Global Healthcare Accreditation’s Certification of Conformance with COVID-19 Guidelines for Medical Travel Programs.

Ratchaphruek Hospital's CEO, Dr. Teerawat Srinakarin, along with staff and GHA's CEO, Ms. Karen Timmons and Bill Cook, Director of Business Development, as the latter announce their certification remotely.
Ratchaphruek Hospital’s CEO, Dr. Teerawat Srinakarin, along with staff and GHA’s CEO, Ms. Karen Timmons and Bill Cook, Director of Business Development, as the latter announce their certification remotely.

The Global Healthcare Accreditation (GHA) Program for Medical Travel Services issued the free COVID-19 Guidelines earlier this year to assist organizations in the medical and health tourism industries seeking to mitigate the risk of coronavirus infection for both domestic and international traveling patients and their companions. The guidelines are unique in that they focus on the entire care continuum, including interactions with the healthcare organization, hotel, and ground transportation.

­Dr. Teerawat Srinakarin, Ratchaphruek Hospital’s Chief Executive Officer stated, “Due to the global COVID-19 pandemic, currently and at least in the near future, there are varying degrees of concern about risk and safety for patients and their families to travel for medical purposes.  I believe the GHA COVID-19 program is one of the most important tools for organizations to implement systematic action guidelines that help to mitigate patient /family pain points and build better experience and trust. On behalf of Ratchaphruek Hospital, I would like to acknowledge Dr. Somporn Kumphong, a GHA representative of Thailand, Karen H. Timmons, CEO and Bill Cook, Director of Business Development for GHA, who have supported us through all the process and have worked together with Ratchaphruek Hospital to help build patient confidence during these challenging moments.”

The Certification of Conformance for hospitals and ambulatory centers is a three-year certification with annual reviews, which signals to medical travelers, referrers, and other payers that the organization has implemented the recommendations in the guidelines as a proactive risk mitigation strategy to ensure patient safety and well-being during and post-COVID-19.  Embedded within the Certification process is an online training for staff to familiarize themselves with the Guidelines and Certification process.

According to Karen Timmons, Chief Executive Officer, Global Healthcare Accreditation (GHA), “The COVID-19 Certification of Conformance helps increase patient trust in an organization by demonstrating that a medical travel program has implemented operational protocols, practices, and procedures that have undergone an external review and reflect international best practices designed to keep traveling patients safe. We congratulate Ratchaphruek Hospital on achieving GHA’s Certification of Conformance and for its strong focus on patient safety and patient experience.”

The Global Healthcare Accreditation (GHA) COVID-19 Program for Medical Travel Services Guidelines are free and the Certification of Conformance is a process that is accomplished virtually and usually within a three to six week period of time.

About GHA

Founded in 2016, the Global Healthcare Accreditation for Medical Travel Services is the only accrediting body focused solely on medical travel services. GHA’s international standards and professional norms for

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Top NYC hospital execs are in Florida as workers fight virus

Two of the Mount Sinai Health System’s top executives are riding out the coronavirus pandemic down in Florida, as their hospitals up north weather medical supply shortages and rising death tolls, report Melissa Klein and Beth Landman of the New York Post.

Dr. Kenneth Davis, 72, the CEO of the Mount Sinai Health System, and Dr. Arthur Klein, 72, president of the Mount Sinai Health Network, are both sheltering near Palm Beach, Florida, according to the Post. Dr. Davis is thought to have been in his waterfront $2.6 million, six-bedroom, eight-bathroom mansion since at least early March. It is not known how long Dr. Klein has been in Florida, but the Post reports that he is staying at his oceanfront condo down in Palm Beach.

Their absence from New York City comes as the city’s health system overflows with victims and patients while the coronavirus pandemic wreaks havoc on the state. New York City is now the epicenter of the virus in the United States, with over 45,000 cases and at least 1,500 reported deaths.

Amid a medical supply shortage, hospital workers have resorted to reusing face masks and wearing trash bags as hospital gowns to treat patients. Makeshift morgues are now situated outside of hospitals, and a field hospital has been set up at Central Park. 

Dr. Davis has been CEO of the Mount Sinai Medical Center since 2003. He was previously the chair of Mount Sinai’s Department of Psychiatry, a position he held for 15 years. He is also a noted Alzheimer’s researcher. Dr. Klein has been president of the Mount Sinai Health Network since February 2013. Trained as a pediatric cardiologist, he previously worked as the Regional Executive Director, Western Region of the North Shore-LIJ Health System.

Two hospital leaders take to Palm Beach as workers in New York City succumb to the coronavirus

In his daily briefing on April 2, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said New York City has only a 6-day supply of ventilators. Meanwhile, NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio expects the number of cases to rise substantially, with an urgent need for increased help and more medical professionals in the city.

Dr. Davis, when reached by the Post, said that he had been in Florida before the pandemic reached the point it’s at now. He also told the Post’s reporters that he was advised by his doctor to stay in Florida because of his age. He then suggested that Dr. Klein was told the same thing and that they don’t have to physically be in the city to “get the job done.”

Meanwhile, hospital workers in the city, including those who work for Mount Sinai, are being infected with the virus as they treat patients. On April 2, it was reported that Priscilla Carrow, a coordinating manager at Elmhurst Hospital in Queens, had died from COVID-19, just days after Kious Kelly, an assistant nurse manager at Mount Sinai West in Manhattan, died. Kelly was just 48.

“Do you know that from the time

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Mount Sinai hospital leaders in Florida during crisis

While heroic staffers beg for protective equipment and don garbage bags to treat coronavirus patients at a Mount Sinai hospital, two of the system’s top executives are waiting out the public health catastrophe in the comfort of their Florida vacation homes, The Post has learned.

Dr. Kenneth Davis, 72, the CEO of the Mount Sinai Health System who pulled down nearly $6 million in compensation in 2018, is ensconced in his waterfront mansion near Palm Beach.

Davis has been in the Sunshine State for weeks and is joined by Dr. Arthur Klein, 72, president of the Mount Sinai Health Network, who owns an oceanfront condo in Palm Beach.

As the duo work from “home,” the Upper East Side-based hospital system seems to be imploding.

Mount Sinai West assistant nursing manager Kious Kelly succumbed Tuesday to COVID-19; maintenance workers scrambled to create patient pods in the main hospital’s vast lobby to deal with patient overflow, and specialists were called to the front lines to treat the sick.

A photo of nurses at Mount Sinai West near Columbus Circle wearing trash bags because they said there were no more gowns highlighted the dire supply shortage. City Council Speaker Corey Johnson called the photos and situation “shameful and shocking.”

Some nurses continued to say they lacked personal protective equipment Thursday despite claims by the hospital administration, and even Gov. Andrew Cuomo at his daily briefing, that there were enough supplies.

Dr. Kenneth Davis
Dr. Kenneth Davis speaks at a March 2 press conference about the state’s first confirmed coronavirus case.Stephen Yang

But staffers across the system talked about hospitals under siege.

“People come in, they get intubated, they die, the cycle repeats,” Dr. Steve Kasspidis, of Mount Sinai Queens in Astoria, told Sky News. “The system is overwhelmed all over the place.”

The head of the New York State Nurses Association blasted the ghost leaders.

“How can you inspire confidence in your employees who are in the front lines of the epicenter that you have their best interests at heart when you are 1,000 miles away? Even more important, what are you doing to procure the PPE that is proven to save lives of caregivers and, ultimately, the patients we care for? We are not protected. And every day it is getting worse,” said Judy Sheridan-Gonzalez, the union president.

Davis, reached at his six-bedroom, eight-bathroom home by The Post Friday, said he was told by his own doctor to stay in Florida because he was older than 70. He said he was already there on a fundraising trip for the hospital “before this started.”

But Davis was in New York on March 2 participating in a press conference the day after the city’s first case was announced. A Mount Sinai spokesman said Davis traveled south in early March.

Davis angrily insisted that he did not need to be in the Big Apple, or be with beleaguered staff, to get the job done.

“Do you know that from the time I wake up from the time

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