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49ers to travel 700 miles for home games as Covid-19 continues to hit NFL

The San Francisco 49ers will play two home games in Arizona after new coronavirus regulations put in place by officials in northern California forced the team to find a temporary new home.



a stadium full of people: Photograph: Tony Avelar/AP


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Tony Avelar/AP

The news came as Covid-19 continues to ravage the NFL. The Denver Broncos were forced to play a back-up wide receiver at quarterback on Sunday after their regular signal-callers were affected by the virus, while the New Orleans Saints were fined heavily for failing to follow mask protocols. All NFL team facilities are closed on Monday and Tuesday because of the rise in Covid-19 cases across the United States, in addition to the “understanding that a number of players and staff celebrated the Thanksgiving holiday with out-of-town guests,” according to a league statement released on Friday.



a large stadium: The San Francisco 49ers will be forced to play their next two home games away from Levi’s Stadium.


© Photograph: Tony Avelar/AP
The San Francisco 49ers will be forced to play their next two home games away from Levi’s Stadium.

Related: NFL with no quarterbacks? The league’s Covid-19 problems are just starting

An outbreak in the Baltimore Ravens camp has led to their crucial game against their fierce rivals the Pittsburgh Steelers being delayed until Tuesday. There were 70 positive tests among NFL players and staff in the week ending 21 November, compared to seven in the first week of the season, at the start of September.

The US as a whole is expecting a further rise in Covid-19 cases in the next few weeks after people travelled to visit family and friends for the Thanksgiving holiday. The virus has killed more than 265,000 people in America, the highest total for any country.

As for the 49ers, they will host the Buffalo Bills next Monday and Washington on 13 December at State Farm Stadium, home of the Arizona Cardinals, 700 miles from their base in Santa Clara county. The team said it will have information on practice arrangements later.

The AFC East-leading Bills will be returning to Arizona for the second time in a little over three weeks, following a 32-30 loss to the Cardinals on 15 November.

“The Cardinals organization, State Farm Stadium and League officials have been supportive and accommodating as we work through the many logistical issues involved in relocating NFL games,” the 49ers said in a statement.

Santa Clara county announced new rules on Saturday that include a three-week ban on practices and games for contact sports. The Niners were on a plane getting ready to travel to Los Angeles, where they beat the Rams 23-20 on Sunday, when the players and coaches heard about the rules.

The rules will also affect the San Jose Sharks of the NHL and college teams at Stanford and San Jose State. Along with the ban on contact sports, the new rules require anyone who has traveled more than 150 miles from the county to quarantine for 14 days.

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The plan for a new aquatics and recreation center in Great Falls has hit a snag





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The plan for a new aquatics and recreation center in Great Falls has hit a snag

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49ers to travel 700 miles for home games as Covid-19 continues to hit NFL | San Francisco 49ers

The San Francisco 49ers will play two home games in Arizona after new coronavirus regulations put in place by officials in northern California forced the team to find a temporary new home.

The news came as Covid-19 continues to ravage the NFL. The Denver Broncos were forced to play a back-up wide receiver at quarterback on Sunday after their regular signal-callers were affected by the virus, while the New Orleans Saints were fined heavily for failing to follow mask protocols. All NFL team facilities are closed on Monday and Tuesday because of the rise in Covid-19 cases across the United States, in addition to the “understanding that a number of players and staff celebrated the Thanksgiving holiday with out-of-town guests,” according to a league statement released on Friday.

An outbreak in the Baltimore Ravens camp has led to their crucial game against their fierce rivals the Pittsburgh Steelers being delayed until Tuesday. There were 70 positive tests among NFL players and staff in the week ending 21 November, compared to seven in the first week of the season, at the start of September.

The US as a whole is expecting a further rise in Covid-19 cases in the next few weeks after people travelled to visit family and friends for the Thanksgiving holiday. The virus has killed more than 265,000 people in America, the highest total for any country.

As for the 49ers, they will host the Buffalo Bills next Monday and Washington on 13 December at State Farm Stadium, home of the Arizona Cardinals, 700 miles from their base in Santa Clara county. The team said it will have information on practice arrangements later.

The AFC East-leading Bills will be returning to Arizona for the second time in a little over three weeks, following a 32-30 loss to the Cardinals on 15 November.

“The Cardinals organization, State Farm Stadium and League officials have been supportive and accommodating as we work through the many logistical issues involved in relocating NFL games,” the 49ers said in a statement.

Santa Clara county announced new rules on Saturday that include a three-week ban on practices and games for contact sports. The Niners were on a plane getting ready to travel to Los Angeles, where they beat the Rams 23-20 on Sunday, when the players and coaches heard about the rules.

The rules will also affect the San Jose Sharks of the NHL and college teams at Stanford and San Jose State. Along with the ban on contact sports, the new rules require anyone who has traveled more than 150 miles from the county to quarantine for 14 days.

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Leonen Hit Over ‘P5M’ Vacation House

SUPREME Court Associate Justice Marvic Leonen appeared disappointed over the expose’ that he had personally requested for P5 million worth of “renovation” for his vacation house in Baguio City.

Leonen stressed in his press statement that he did not ask the en banc of the Supreme Court to release and finance the P4,970,623.71 cost of repairing the vacation house that was assigned to him and his staff in Baguio City.

My chambers never endorsed the P5-million proposal to renovate Cottage G in Baguio City. The proposal was drafted by the Supreme Court’s Maintenance Division and, without having gone through my office, was placed in the Court’s En Banc agenda. Upon learning of this, I immediately wrote a letter requesting that the matter be withdrawn, and it was promptly deleted,” Leonen said in his November 26 press statement.

Media reports showed that Leonen wrote a letter to Chief Justice Diosdado Peralta on November 23, a day before the bench’s en banc discussed the P5 million Cottage G, requesting for a postponement of the magistrates’s decision about the issue since the associate justice wanted to ‘review’ and ‘study’ the whole picture of the renovation, materials that will be used and its costs. Peralta agreed not to tackle the Cottage G issue.

Leonen’s supposed intent to change the vacation house was revealed to the media while the gross domestic product (GDP) has gone so deeply since the second quarter of the year.

The government’s top economists expect that the low ratings of GDP will last until the end of the year.
GDP, which is the total amount of produced commodities and services in a specific period (quarter and one whole year), is the yardstick of every country’s economy.

It was previously revealed in the Senate that more than 10 million workers have gone jobless, more than three million have experienced hunger, hundreds of businessmen from the Micro, Small, Medium Enterprises (SMEs) complained of bankruptcy due to the coronavirus disease – 2019 (COVID – 19).

As this happened, it was revealed in the media that Leonen’s office on October 17 wrote a letter to Deputy Clerk of Court Ma. Carina Cunanan, of the high bench’s Administrative Services, about the P5 million worth of renovation of Cottage G.

The one who wrote the letter to Cunanan was Atty. Jeanne Carla T. Ferrer – Becina, Leonen’s “judicial staff head”.

The letter was made a few weeks after the “modified enhanced community quarantine” (MECQ) in several regions in Luzon was lifted.

The government and the private sector have started to train their guns on addressing the poverty that have hit millions of Filipinos during the COVID – 19 and the attack of typhoons “Quinta” and “Rolly” in October. Thousands of families were severely affected by the typhoons, including the lost their houses. But, Leonen allegedly did not withdraw his plan.

The high court’s justices have their respective vacation houses in Baguio City which they use in their

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U.S. air travel hit post-March peak on day before Thanksgiving

Despite warnings from public health officials, more people in the U.S. boarded planes on the day before Thanksgiving than any day since March, part of a broader surge in travel that comes amid a significant surge of Covid-19 cases.



a group of people standing in a room


© Provided by NBC News


According to Transportation Security Administration figures, 1,070,967 people crossed TSA checkpoints Wednesday, part of a surge in travel in the seven days leading up to Thanksgiving that brought more than 6.8 million people to airports across the country.

But overall travel remains significantly lower than years past. Wednesday’s figure is less than half as many of the 2.6 million who traveled the day before Thanksgiving in 2019.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention sent a last-minute warning on Nov. 19 asking Americans to avoid travelling for Thanksgiving due to “exponential growth” in Covid-19 cases.

More than 1.2 million people in the U.S. contracted Covid-19 in the week leading up to Thanksgiving, close to double the 635,000-plus new cases three weeks before that. Case counts continue to be up across most of the country.

The 1.1 million travelers on Wednesday was the most passengers screened by the TSA since March 16, when 1.25 million passengers crossed its checkpoints. Similarly, the 6.8 million travelers in the week leading up to Thanksgiving were the most in any seven-day span since March 14 to March 20.

According to flight-tracking service FlightRadar24, there were more airplanes in the skies at noon Eastern the Tuesday before Thanksgiving than there were on the same Tuesday in 2018, and 8 percent fewer than in 2019.

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Despite A Bumpy Ride, This Travel Car Seat Is Ready To Hit The Road

Any parent will tell you that car seats are a travel nightmare, especially now that safety experts recommend keeping children strapped into booster seats until they’re 8 to 12 years old. Carrying or switching car seats can prove extremely difficult and time consuming, if not realistically impossible. Renting them from car rental agencies when traveling is expensive. What about car seats in taxis and Ubers? Most parents just give up and say, “Nope!”

In 2017, two jet-setting “dadrepreneurs” decided to tackle this problem. Andy Macaluso and Daneil Schlaepfer conceived their idea while rock climbing. They then spent two years developing and testing WhizRider, a breakthrough harness-style portable child restraint system that solves car seat woes. About the size of a coffee cup and weighing less than one pound, WhizRider is small and light enough to toss into a handbag, backpack, suitcase, or glovebox – so that parents can bring it with them everywhere they go.

WhizRider is developed based on the latest data from the biomechanics and accident research fields. Its innovative concept prevents children from sliding under the lap belt (or “submarining”), one of the most common safety issues for kids in vehicles today. WhizRider keeps children safe on trips and in a pinch when a car seat or booster isn’t a viable option. It exceeds U.S. federal safety requirements.

Macaluso and Schlaepfer had begun a new fundraising round to grow retail channels and brand awareness in the US back in January 2020. Then the Covid-19 pandemic hit, and WhizRider lost almost 90% off all commitments overnight. In parallel, WhizRider was defined as an emerging brand by Amazon USA and became a member of their Launchpad program. But then Amazon closed its warehouses for non-essential products. Furthermore, families stopped traveling and using taxis or ride sharing apps altogether.

“We were ready, but couldn’t sell product,” says Macaluso. “It was and is still an extremely difficult situation without real monthly revenue. However, as an entrepreneur, you need to be optimistic. We worked very hard and have been able to win some deals in retail stores in 2021.”

To survive, WhizRider’s cofounders did everything they could to cut costs. They terminated agreements with some partners and reduced services with others. And of course, Macaluso and Schlaepfer decreased their own salaries. They remain motivated thanks to the positive feedback they continue to receive from customers and the retail world in general.

These days, Macaluso and Schlaepfer feel optimistic leading WhizRider into 2021. “With all the positive news regarding vaccines, we are very hopeful that some sort of return to normalcy is around the corner. We strongly believe WhizRider will take off once ride sharing and travel become more prevalent again,” says Macaluso. “We are also extremely proud

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Despite officials’ warnings and pleas, travel over Thanksgiving is expected to hit a pandemic peak.

The nation’s health experts on Sunday pleaded with Americans to stay home over the Thanksgiving holiday and forgo any plans to travel or celebrate at large family gatherings, even as airports have recorded a significant rise in passengers.

Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, the country’s top infectious disease specialist, and other health experts relayed a clear message on Sunday morning news shows: with coronavirus cases surging to record levels across the country, turning nearly every state into a hot zone of transmission, the risk of getting infected, whether in transit or in even small indoor gatherings, is high.

Up to 50 million people could be traveling on roads and through airports in the United States over Thanksgiving this year, according to AAA, the biggest travel surge since the pandemic began, despite strong cautions from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other health authorities. A video of a packed airport in Phoenix has been circulating widely on social media. As of Sunday, 47 states — all but Hawaii, Maine and Vermont — were considered high-risk zones for viral transmission, and nationwide hospitalizations were at a record 83,227.

“Please seriously consider decisions that you make,” Dr. Fauci said on the CBS show “Face the Nation.” Encountering large numbers of people in airports and on planes is particularly dangerous, he said. Although airlines have invested in air circulation and ventilation systems to minimize viral transmission, Dr. Fauci said, “sometimes when you get a crowded plane, or you’re in a crowded airport, you’re lining up, not everybody’s wearing masks — that puts yourself at risk.”

And gathering indoors, whether you travel or not, carries risk. “When you’re eating and drinking, obviously, you have to take your mask off,” Dr. Fauci said. “We know now that those are the kinds of situations that are leading to outbreaks.”

Dr. Tom Inglesby, director of the Center for Health Security of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, said on Fox News on Sunday that because about half of infections are spread by people who don’t have any symptoms, “you can’t assume that you don’t have the virus, and you can’t assume that the people whose home you’re about to enter don’t have the virus, at this point in our pandemic.”

He recommended celebrating Thanksgiving only with the people you live with. People who choose to visit others’ homes should spend as much time as possible outdoors and “should be wearing masks indoors when they’re together, and only removing them when they’re eating.”

In Tulsa, Okla., Victory, a megachurch, canceled a “Friendsgiving” service on Sunday that had called on members to bring a friend after it prompted an outcry, instead opting to give away boxed meals, NBC News reported. The church did not respond to a request for comment regarding its planned “Thanksgiving Day Brunch,” which, according to its website, is set to be held on Thursday in the church’s cafeteria.

Dr. Fauci and others warned that Americans’ behavior over Thanksgiving would have critical implications for

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Cases in Japan hit record amid holiday travel

TOKYO (AP) — The daily tally of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Japan hit a record for the fourth day at 2,508, the Health Ministry said Sunday.

Japan has had fewer than 2,000 coronavirus-related deaths so far, avoiding the toll of harder hit nations. But fears are growing about another surge. A flurry of criticism from opposition legislators and the public has slammed the government for being too slow in halting its “GoTo” tourism campaign, which encouraged travel and dining out with discounts.

Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga on Saturday scrapped the campaign, but only after many people had already made travel reservations for a three-day Thanksgiving weekend in Japan.

Airports and restaurants have been packed. Some say the government should have offered to pay for cancellations, or stepped up PCR testing instead, if the goal is to keep the economy going amid a pandemic. Tutorials are circulating online on the proper way to eat and drink at restaurants while wearing masks.

In other developments in the Asia-Pacific region:

— India has registered 45,209 new confirmed cases in the past 24 hours amid a festival season surge in the country’s capital and many other parts. At least three Indian states — Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh and Gujarat — have imposed night curfews in many cities. The Health Ministry on Sunday also registered 501 deaths in the past 24 hours, taking total fatalities up to 133,227. While the overall pace of new cases appears to be slowing, experts have cautioned that official figures may be offering false hope since many infections are undetected.

— South Australia and Victoria states eased COVID-19 restrictions Sunday as Australia heads into summer in a better position to fight the virus. Victoria, which was hardest hit, has gone 23 days without a new infection. In response, Premier Daniel Andrews announced a number of changes to restrictions. Mask-wearing outdoors, which until now has been mandatory, is no longer required where social distancing is possible. Masks will still have to be worn indoors and carried at all times. Home gatherings of up to 15 people will be allowed and up to 50 people can gather outdoors. Up to 150 people will be allowed at weddings, funerals or indoor religious services. Residents of South Australia emerged from a state-wide lockdown at midnight Saturday, and are now able to visit bars and restaurants in groups of up to 10 and host gatherings up of to 50 people with social distancing. Gyms and beauty salons can open and students will return to schools from Monday. The border between Victoria and New South Wales states, closed at the height of the Victoria outbreak three months ago, will reopen Sunday. New South Wales Premier Gladys Berejiklian said, “We never want to see this ever again. We hope this is the last time that in our lifetime this border is closed.”

— Authorities are conducting mass testing and shutting down schools after China reported three new domestically transmitted cases in the past 24 hours — two in

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Airlines take another hit as CDC warns against Thanksgiving travel

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) dealt a blow to airlines and the broader travel industry Thursday by recommending Americans stay home for Thanksgiving as coronavirus cases surge in almost every state.



a group of people sitting on a suitcase: Airlines take another hit as CDC warns against Thanksgiving travel


© Getty Images
Airlines take another hit as CDC warns against Thanksgiving travel

Airlines are countering that passengers are safe on planes because of precautionary measures in place, and the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) says people should be free to make up their minds about whether to visit family and friends during what’s typically the busiest travel holiday of the year.

“The decision to travel is up to the traveler,” TSA Administrator David Pekoske said at a briefing Thursday, adding that CDC guidelines should also be taken into consideration. “It’s an individual choice to make the journey, we just want to do everything we can to do the utmost to protect passengers should they choose to make that journey.”

More than 1 million coronavirus cases were reported in the U.S. over the past seven days, the most since the pandemic started. That in turn has led to increased hospitalizations and more deaths, with the U.S. passing the quarter-million mark earlier this week.

Those case spikes are a major reason why the latest CDC guidance recommended forgoing travel at this time, saying Thanksgiving should be spent only with people living in the same household.

Airline industry executives, meanwhile, are insisting that air travel is safe, pointing to improved air quality in cabins and mandating masks for passengers and crew.

“You are safe on an airplane. The reason you are safe is because of a multi-layered approach of risk mitigation put in place,” said Nicholas Calio, CEO of Airlines for America, the main advocacy group for major U.S. airlines.

In response to the CDC’s travel warning, US Travel Association CEO Roger Dow said the agency’s guidance “further underscores the need to be really smart and highly vigilant on health and safety protocols if you’re going to choose to travel.”

Even with safety measures in place on planes, health officials are concerned that travelers will spread the virus at Thanksgiving Day gatherings and while in transit. Despite many major airlines requiring masks, airports are free to set their own rules.

Airlines are strictly enforcing their mask requirements, warning back in June that passengers who refuse to comply could be put on a carrier’s do-not-fly list.

Delta’s no-fly list includes around 550 passengers, up from 100 in July.

The airline also recently announced it will continue blocking middle seats through March to encourage social distancing.

Southwest Airlines, meanwhile, plans to resume filling those seats next month. Other airlines like United and American have not blocked middle seats during the pandemic.

AAA projected last month that 50 million Americans would travel for Thanksgiving this year, a 10 percent drop from 2019, making it the biggest one-year decline since the Great Recession in 2008.

The travel group also noted that many people will make last-minute decisions about traveling, making the CDC

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Airbnb Reveals Falling Revenue, With Travel Hit by Pandemic

SAN FRANCISCO — Airbnb, the home rental service that disrupted the travel industry and was itself disrupted by the coronavirus, took a major step toward one of the year’s largest initial public offerings when it revealed declining revenue and growing losses in a prospectus on Monday.

The offering, which could value Airbnb at more than $30 billion and raise as much as $3 billion, will test investors’ appetite for hospitality-related stocks in a year when the industry has been battered and its future is uncertain. The company provides a marketplace for people to rent their homes, taking a percentage of the fees, and facilitates bookings for activities.

Airbnb’s prospectus painted an optimistic picture, advertising its brand’s association with unique travel experiences. “We have helped millions of people satisfy a fundamental human need for connection,” the company said. “And it is through this connection that people can experience a greater sense of belonging.”

In total, Airbnb brought in $2.5 billion in revenue in the first nine months of the year, down from $3.7 billion a year earlier. Its net loss more than doubled during that period to $697 million. The company’s shrinking revenue means it cannot pitch Wall Street on the typical tech start-up narrative of soaring growth. It was the first time Airbnb provided a comprehensive look at its finances.

Airbnb was valued at $31 billion before the pandemic, but some investors bought shares valuing it at $18 billion after travel ground to a halt.

Airbnb follows a string of highly valued start-ups to the public market this year. Listing shares in recent months, to mixed reviews, were Palantir, a data company valued at $20 billion; Unity Technologies, a gaming software business worth $6.2 billion; Snowflake, a data storage start-up worth $12.4 billion; and Asana, a collaboration technology provider valued at $1.5 billion. On Friday, the delivery start-up DoorDash also revealed its finances in preparation for going public.

This is a developing story. Check back for updates.

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