Tag: Historic

AHF: Skid Row’s King Edward Hotel Earns City’s Historic Designation

In 2018, the 1906-era Beaux Arts hotel on Skid Row was repurposed by AHF and the Healthy Housing Foundation for use as housing for the homeless and extremely-low-income individuals

Los Angeles City Council grants Historic-Cultural Monument status to the hotel and its King Eddy Saloon, a bar and former speakeasy in continuous operation since the 1930s

The Los Angeles City Council has designated the King Edward Hotel, a 1906-era Beaux Arts hotel, and its King Eddy Saloon, a bar and former speakeasy in continuous operation since the 1930s, status as the newest Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201127005607/en/

The 1906-era King Edward Hotel on L.A.'s Skid Row was repurposed by AHF and its Healthy Housing Foundation for use as housing for the homeless and extremely-low-income individuals. (Graphic: Business Wire)

The 1906-era King Edward Hotel on L.A.’s Skid Row was repurposed by AHF and its Healthy Housing Foundation for use as housing for the homeless and extremely-low-income individuals. (Graphic: Business Wire)

The 150-room hotel, located on the edge of L.A.’s Skid Row, was purchased, refurbished and repurposed by AHF and the Healthy Housing Foundation in 2018 for use as housing for the homeless and extremely-low-income individuals.

“While I am extremely pleased that our City Council designated the King Edward Hotel an official Historic-Cultural Monument—a well-deserved recognition for this beautiful 1906 Beaux Arts hotel located in the heart of Skid Row—I believe what really makes this property historic is its new life repurposed as housing for formerly homeless and extremely-low-income individuals,” said Hon. Kevin de Léon, Los Angeles City Council Member for District 14. “I’ve always said our approach to reducing homelessness must be all hands on deck, so AHF and the Healthy Housing Foundation are to be commended for their innovative and cost-effective approach to address our growing homeless situation via the adaptive reuse of many old hotels and motels like the King Edward, an approach I believe the city and other organizations should get behind.”

The historic designation came via City Council’s adoption of a motion passed on consent calendar at Wednesday’s council meeting (Agenda Item #29—Council File item #20-0736).

According to documents submitted in support of the designation, the Cultural Heritage Commission, in a June 11, 2020 letter and memo to the city’s Planning and Land Use Management Committee (PLUM), recommended that PLUM urge the City Council consider the King Edward Hotel for inclusion in the list of Historic-Cultural Monuments. The Heritage Commission had previously voted unanimously (on May 5, 2020) to recommend Historic-Cultural Monument status. The Cultural Heritage Commission noted:

“The King Edward Hotel meets two of the Historic-Cultural Monument criteria: it “exemplifies significant contributions to the broad cultural, economic or social history of the nation, state, city or community” for its association with the early 20th century development of hotels in Downtown Los Angeles, and as the home of the King Eddy Saloon, a business important to the commercial identity of Downtown Los Angeles that has continuously operated at the property since the 1930s; and it “embodies the distinctive characteristics of a style, type, period, or method of construction” and “represents a notable work of a master designer,

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AHF: Skid Row’s King Edward Hotel Earns City’s Historic Designation

AHF: Skid Row’s King Edward Hotel Earns City’s Historic Designation

In 2018, the 1906-era Beaux Arts hotel on Skid Row was repurposed by AHF and the Healthy Housing Foundation for use as housing for the homeless and extremely-low-income individuals

Los Angeles City Council grants Historic-Cultural Monument status to the hotel and its King Eddy Saloon, a bar and former speakeasy in continuous operation since the 1930s

The Los Angeles City Council has designated the King Edward Hotel, a 1906-era Beaux Arts hotel, and its King Eddy Saloon, a bar and former speakeasy in continuous operation since the 1930s, status as the newest Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201127005607/en/

The 1906-era King Edward Hotel on L.A.’s Skid Row was repurposed by AHF and its Healthy Housing Foundation for use as housing for the homeless and extremely-low-income individuals. (Graphic: Business Wire)

The 150-room hotel, located on the edge of L.A.’s Skid Row, was purchased, refurbished and repurposed by AHF and the Healthy Housing Foundation in 2018 for use as housing for the homeless and extremely-low-income individuals.

“While I am extremely pleased that our City Council designated the King Edward Hotel an official Historic-Cultural Monument—a well-deserved recognition for this beautiful 1906 Beaux Arts hotel located in the heart of Skid Row—I believe what really makes this property historic is its new life repurposed as housing for formerly homeless and extremely-low-income individuals,” said Hon. Kevin de Léon, Los Angeles City Council Member for District 14. “I’ve always said our approach to reducing homelessness must be all hands on deck, so AHF and the Healthy Housing Foundation are to be commended for their innovative and cost-effective approach to address our growing homeless situation via the adaptive reuse of many old hotels and motels like the King Edward, an approach I believe the city and other organizations should get behind.”

The historic designation came via City Council’s adoption of a motion passed on consent calendar at Wednesday’s council meeting (Agenda Item #29—Council File item #20-0736).

According to documents submitted in support of the designation, the Cultural Heritage Commission, in a June 11, 2020 letter and memo to the city’s Planning and Land Use Management Committee (PLUM), recommended that PLUM urge the City Council consider the King Edward Hotel for inclusion in the list of Historic-Cultural Monuments. The Heritage Commission had previously voted unanimously (on May 5, 2020) to recommend Historic-Cultural Monument status. The Cultural Heritage Commission noted:

“The King Edward Hotel meets two of the Historic-Cultural Monument criteria: it “exemplifies significant contributions to the broad cultural, economic or social history of the nation, state, city or community” for its association with the early 20th century development of hotels in Downtown Los Angeles, and as the home of the King Eddy Saloon, a business important to the commercial identity of Downtown Los Angeles that has continuously operated at the property since the 1930s; and it “embodies the distinctive characteristics of a style, type, period, or method of

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AHF: Skid Row’s King Edward Hotel Earns City’s Historic Designation – Press Release

LOS ANGELES–(Business Wire)–The Los Angeles City Council has designated the King Edward Hotel, a 1906-era Beaux Arts hotel, and its King Eddy Saloon, a bar and former speakeasy in continuous operation since the 1930s, status as the newest Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201127005607/en/

The 1906-era King Edward Hotel on L.A.'s Skid Row was repurposed by AHF and its Healthy Housing Foundation for use as housing for the homeless and extremely-low-income individuals. (Graphic: Business Wire)

The 1906-era King Edward Hotel on L.A.’s Skid Row was repurposed by AHF and its Healthy Housing Foundation for use as housing for the homeless and extremely-low-income individuals. (Graphic: Business Wire)

The 150-room hotel, located on the edge of L.A.’s Skid Row, was purchased, refurbished and repurposed by AHF and the Healthy Housing Foundation in 2018 for use as housing for the homeless and extremely-low-income individuals.

“While I am extremely pleased that our City Council designated the King Edward Hotel an official Historic-Cultural Monument—a well-deserved recognition for this beautiful 1906 Beaux Arts hotel located in the heart of Skid Row—I believe what really makes this property historic is its new life repurposed as housing for formerly homeless and extremely-low-income individuals,” said Hon. Kevin de Léon, Los Angeles City Council Member for District 14. “I’ve always said our approach to reducing homelessness must be all hands on deck, so AHF and the Healthy Housing Foundation are to be commended for their innovative and cost-effective approach to address our growing homeless situation via the adaptive reuse of many old hotels and motels like the King Edward, an approach I believe the city and other organizations should get behind.”

The historic designation came via City Council’s adoption of a motion passed on consent calendar at Wednesday’s council meeting (Agenda Item #29—Council File item #20-0736).

According to documents submitted in support of the designation, the Cultural Heritage Commission, in a June 11, 2020 letter and memo to the city’s Planning and Land Use Management Committee (PLUM), recommended that PLUM urge the City Council consider the King Edward Hotel for inclusion in the list of Historic-Cultural Monuments. The Heritage Commission had previously voted unanimously (on May 5, 2020) to recommend Historic-Cultural Monument status. The Cultural Heritage Commission noted:

“The King Edward Hotel meets two of the Historic-Cultural Monument criteria: it “exemplifies significant contributions to the broad cultural, economic or social history of the nation, state, city or community” for its association with the early 20th century development of hotels in Downtown Los Angeles, and as the home of the King Eddy Saloon, a business important to the commercial identity of Downtown Los Angeles that has continuously operated at the property since the 1930s; and it “embodies the distinctive characteristics of a style, type, period, or method of construction” and “represents a notable work of a master designer, builder, or architect whose individual genius influenced his or her age” as an excellent example of a commercial building in the Beaux Arts architectural style, and a significant work of master architect John Parkinson.”

“I’m thrilled that the city has recognized John Parkinson’s King Edward Hotel as a protected cultural landmark. The hotel is

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Philly undoes deal with developer Peebles to revamp historic Family Court building into luxury hotel

Philadelphia officials have broken off an agreement to sell the historic Family Court building on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway to Peebles Corp. for the developer to revamp into a 203-room luxury hotel, as the coronavirus pandemic clouds the demand outlook for visitor accommodations in the city.



a large building by a road: The old Family Court building at 1801 Vine St. in Center City. Philadelphia officials have terminated developer Peebles Corp.’s deal to revamp the historic Family Court building.


© ALEJANDRO A. ALVAREZ/The Philadelphia Inquirer/TNS
The old Family Court building at 1801 Vine St. in Center City. Philadelphia officials have terminated developer Peebles Corp.’s deal to revamp the historic Family Court building.

The Philadelphia Industrial Development Corp. said that it had “coordinated with the city and concluded that we will formally terminate the agreement” to purchase and redevelop building at 1801 Vine St., across from Logan Square, according to an email the agency sent last week to Christopher Leng Smith, Peebles’ managing director for the northeast U.S.

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The decision was made “in consideration of the impact of COVID on the hospitality market,” Sam Rhoads, a PIDC executive vice president, wrote to Smith in the email, which was provided to The Inquirer.

The move underscores the uncertainty surrounding the hotel industry and other categories of commercial real estate, with the long-term impact of the pandemic on everything from office use to convention businesses yet to play out.

“Nobody really knows what the landscape is going to look like post-pandemic,” said Christophe Terlizzi, who heads KeyBank’s commercial real estate practice in the region. “It’s unknown and it’s unknowable.”

Although hotel performance has ticked up since the early days of the pandemic, when business travel and tourism came to a virtual halt, the sector continues to struggle.

Occupancy at hotels in Philadelphia and the surrounding Pennsylvania and South Jersey counties remained depressed at 46% during the week ended Nov. 14, down from 74% during the same week a year ago, according to the hospitality-industry tracker STR Inc.

Revenue per available room, a standard metric used in the hospitality industry to gauge hotel performance, fell 61%, from $110.53 to $42.75, during that time.

With vaccinations against the coronavirus expected to reach the market in the months to come, some see a resumption of more commercial activity on the city’s horizon. Yet, it’s uncertain how long some sectors, such as hospitality, will take to return to pre-pandemic levels, if they ever do.

Workers who have gotten used to discussing business with associates around the world using teleconferencing software such as Zoom may be less likely than before to take expensive and time-consuming business trips or attend costly conventions, some have speculated.

And Center City may become less of a destination for whatever business travel remains if companies continue allowing employees to work from home, or if a new demand for less densely filled offices prompts a move to the suburbs where space is cheaper, others fear.

“In 2020, the immense adverse impact to the hospitality industry caused by the COVID-19 novel coronavirus created significant changes in market dynamics that impacted viability of hospitality development across the nation,” PIDC president Anne Bovaird Nevins said in an email

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Check Into This Washington D.C. Hotel Where You Can Sleep in a Historic Townhouse

Pandemic notwithstanding, hotels in Washington, D.C., are filling fast for January’s inauguration festivities. Some of the newest accommodations in the capital not only have impeccable aesthetic pedigree, but they also make social-distancing protocols easy to follow. Opening today and comprising six individual one-bedroom homes-away-from-home, the town houses at Georgetown’s Rosewood hotel each offer 1,100 square feet of serenely decorated space spread among their five levels, plus a private entrance, terrace, and courtyard.

Rosewood tasked the D.C.-born, -bred, and -based designer Thomas Pheasant with the job of creating the one-bedroom super-suites, each of which occupies a petite, early-19th-century brick row house steps from the hotel itself.

A look inside the newly renovated living room.

Photo: Rosewood/Ryan Forbes

“The idea was to create a villa-style experience here in Georgetown,” says Pheasant, whose studio is walking distance from the hotel and who also looked after the recent redo of Rosewood’s beloved Mansion on Turtle Creek property, in Dallas, Texas. “Even before COVID-19,” he continues, “people often wanted something other than the typical hotel. Visitors coming for two weeks or a month on business, or for other purposes, want something more private, a space that can give them the sense of really living in D.C.”

When the town houses came to Pheasant, he found them in a rather dire state. Originally designed as workers’ residences, they didn’t have much in the way of detail, and they had suffered some benign neglect, if not outright abuse. An additional challenge? “While they all look the same from the outside, it was sort of a free-for-all when they were built,” Pheasant says. “Some were narrower than others, some a foot shorter.” He rose to the occasion, tweaking his scheme to meet the needs of each unique space, imagining, for example, a beautiful little study in a bay-windowed nook off the entryway of one unit. “The odd ones that had a lot of quirks turned out to have the most interesting to work with,” he says. 

Inside the bedroom of the Rosewood hotel.

Photo: Rosewood/Ryan Forbes

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Historic Aberdeen Ardoe House Hotel and Spa falls into hand of liquidators

Historic Aberdeen hotel to close with loss of 68 jobs

The Mercure Aberdeen Ardoe House Hotel and Spa in Blairs – three miles outside of Aberdeen city – is being placed into creditors voluntary liquidation after being hit by the oil industry downturn and restrictions put in place due to the coronavirus pandemic.

The 19th century Scottish baronial style mansion, set in 18 acres of parkland, suffered from the downturn in the local economy due to the collapse of the oil price and its knock-on effect on related businesses. A statement said the onset of the coronavirus lockdown earlier in the year added to cash flow pressures and the business proved unable to recover its normal levels of trading.

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Aberdeen and Aberdeenshire aren currently under level 2 restrictions set out by the Scottish Government.

Ardoe House Hotel has plunged into liquidation
Ardoe House Hotel has plunged into liquidation

The business, which had 120 rooms as well as restaurants, bars and a spa, employed a total of 68 staff. All have been made redundant.

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Read more: Old Course Hotel in St Andrews to close from today

Ken Pattullo, spokesman for business advisory firm Begbies Traynor, said: “Unfortunately, the hospitality sector has been among the hardest hit by the pandemic with the forced closure last spring having devastating consequences for the Ardoe House Hotel. With Aberdeen currently in Level 2 and coronavirus restrictions continuing, the directors felt the hotel was no longer viable and had no choice but to put the business into liquidation.

“In the face of ongoing uncertainty due to the health measures implemented to help combat the global pandemic, there was no way of saving the business and the jobs it supported; it is sad to see the closure of such a popular hotel.”

A Scotsman travel review of the hotel praised its “warm hospitality” and “spacious, restful and extremely comfortable” rooms. The hotel was built in 1878 for eminent surgeon Alexander Ogston and his family and incorporated many design features inspired by nearby Balmoral Castle. It was converted into an hotel in 1947.

Other luxury Scottish hotels have recently closed their doors, citing increased coronavirus restrictions.

The Old Course Hotel in St Andrews shut this week, while the Gleneagles Resort closed last week, with plans to remain shuttered until the end of January.

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Historic Hotel Metropole sign finds new home in San Jose

Another of San Jose’s historic signs has received a new lease on life, with the old Hotel Metropole sign now installed in the beer garden between Camino Brewing and Faber’s Cyclery on South First Street.

Opening in 1903, the Hotel Metropole occupied the top floor of the Alcantara Building, an 1890s brick beauty on Market and Post streets, and its blue porcelain neon sign was a familiar sight for decades as a modern downtown San Jose grew up around it.

The Alcantara building in downtown San Jose, photographed on Wednesday, Nov. 17, 2020, once housed the Hotel Metropole. (Sal Pizarro/Bay Area News Group) 

As downtown’s fortunes turned downward in the 1960s, so did those of the hotel, which always had been a bit of second-rate joint but fell into being a flop house by the early 1980s. The top floor was deemed unsafe after the Loma Prieta earthquake, and the Alcantara building — which also was home to the California Loan pawnshop and Keegan’s Kafe , a popular breakfast spot — was designated a city landmark in 1989 and sold in the late 1990s.

Jim Salata‘s Garden City Construction/Buccaneer Demolition was called in to do the interior demolition of the building, which was then renovated into offices in 2001. (Knight Ridder Digital, Xactly and Electric Cloud occupied the currently empty building for most of the next two decades.) He got both the porcelain sign and an older smaltz sign from the owners, who didn’t want them.

The older sign hung in the Garden City Construction offices until recently. Salata says he’s been toting around the porcelain sign from warehouse to warehouse for the past 22 years. He also kept the original neon tubes in a five-gallon bucket, which allowed glassblower and neon artist Kevin Chong to light them up and determine what color they were at the time the sign was taken down. Salata’s planning a small, private re-lighting ceremony in early December, but the sign’s location on First Street just south of Interstate 280 means everyone can enjoy the sight.

Salata proposed creating a “neon alley” behind Camino Brewing — partly for preservation and partly to deter crime in the area — but didn’t get anywhere with the city. He says he’s happy to be part of the preservation movement, working with people like Chong and others at History San Jose and Preservation Action Council to keep these bright spots of our civic heritage alive.

“This is the end of one long journey for me and I trust the beginning of another,” Salata said. “Perhaps the relighting of the Metropole sign will inspire others to support restoring neon signs from a planning and financial standpoint.”

TECH PUTS LEADERS ONLINE: Back in the pre-COVID world — remember that? — the Tech Interactive honored its Tech for Global Good laureates at a big event (known for many years as the Tech Awards). This year, however, the big “event” is online and the four honored organizations are featured in a Virtual

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Chicopee eyes Community Preservation Act tax for historic preservation, recreation, open space

CHICOPEE — City residents are considering adding a tax surcharge to real estate bills that would help raise money for recreation, historic preservation, protecting open space and improving community housing.

Two decades ago the state adopted the Community Preservation Act, which allows communities to increase tax bills from anywhere between 1% and 3% and earmark that money for a variety of uses. The state also provides a partial match to the amount raised, estimated at about 17% this fiscal year.

About a year ago the Historical Commission formed a committee to examine adopting the act in Chicopee. City Planner Lee Pouliot is now assisting the group and working with the Law Department to find the best way to move forward with the idea, said Joshua Clark.

“I am, as chairman of the historical society, really, really excited about this,” Clark said. “It can raise a lot of money and raise awareness for historic preservation.”

The only way the act can be approved is if voters pass a ballot question, according to state law. The City Council and mayor can agree to place the question on the ballot, or supporters can collect enough signatures to bring the issue to the electorate, which is done less often.

If the act is adopted, a committee is appointed to review proposals and vote on how to spend the money raised each year, according to the state law.

A total of 186 communities in Massachusetts have adopted the act, including Springfield, which instituted a 1.5% surcharge in 2016 and raised about $1.4 million last year. Holyoke voters also approved a 1.5% surcharge in 2016 and raised about $579,400 in the last fiscal year. West Springfield, Westfield, Agawam, Northampton, Wilbraham, Easthampton and Pittsfield are also among those who have instituted the act.

The city funds a lot of projects the Community Preservation Act supports, such as park improvements, but it could be helpful to have money dedicated to recreation and historic improvements. If the city receives a grant that needs a matching amount, Community Preservation Act money could be used for that, Pouliot said.

The guidelines for how the money can be spent are broad, meaning that it can benefit the city in many ways such as funding a project that wasn’t anticipated in the budget, he said.

“I think we should look at all funding opportunities. Every dollar counts, particularly in this economy,” he said. “Once we better understand the administrative side there needs to be an educational campaign to dispel myths.”

The Historical Commission is hoping to join with other groups such as the Recreation Commission to work toward putting the question on the ballot and to educate voters. With a $500 annual budget, the Historical Commission will not be able to do the work alone, Clark said.

“People are going to be asked to increase tax money. Especially in a pandemic that is a hard ask, but we are trying to improve the neighborhoods in Chicopee,” he said.

Clark argued if historic properties

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Renaissance St. Augustine Historic Downtown Hotel – Venue – Saint Augustine, FL

The Renaissance St Augustine is a hotel and wedding venue located in the heart of downtown St. Augustine, Florida. This elegant hotel features exquisite architecture, crystal chandeliers and a modern ballroom for glamorous and grand wedding celebrations. With distinct event spaces, world-class dining, traditional Southern hospitality and modern amenities, The Renaissance St Augustine Historic Downtown Hotel provides a stunning setting in a convenient and lively downtown location.

Facilities and Capacity

Opened in 1886, the original San Marco Hotel was an accommodation icon on the east coast. The San Marco hotel hosted explorers, artists, politicians, musicians and more. Its saga ended abruptly in 1898 due to a disastrous fire. However, its legacy lives on through the architecture and design incorporated into the new Renaissance St Augustine Historic Downtown Hotel opening April 2021.

Our timeless indoor venue can host everything from intimate ceremonies to lavish and grand receptions. This venue features the stunning San Marco Ballroom with striking architectural details, crystal chandeliers and neutral color palettes and can host up to 370 guests. The Castillo restaurant and bar also provides space for intimate wedding events.

Services Offered

The Renaissance St Augustine offers venue rental for weddings and other social events. Event services offered include the following:

  • Accommodations
  • Chairs, tables, china, linens and flatware
  • Setup and cleanup
  • Event rentals
  • In-house bar and catering
  • Outside vendors
  • Wireless Internet

Accommodation

The hotel offers guest rooms and suites in a convenient downtown location. These sleek and sophisticated spaces provide all the comforts of home, with amenities such as room service, fitness center and a pool.

Other Services

The Renaissance St Augustine is an ideal location for hosting private parties of varying sizes. In addition to wedding ceremonies and receptions, this location can accommodate all of your wedding events, such as engagement parties, bridal showers and rehearsal dinners. This venue is also available for hosting corporate meetings, holiday parties, birthdays, anniversaries and other special occasions.

Location

This venue is located in the heart of St. Augustine’s historic downtown. The St. Augustine area is populated by historic sites, world-class cultural restaurants and gracious Southern hospitality.

St. Augustine, Florida known commonly as the Ancient City is a popular place for adventure seeking guests alike. The Renaissance Hotel Brand invites you to “Discover this Way” all our city’s historical stories, architecture, cuisine, and charm.

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How the historic center of Black life in Dallas became a luxury hotel

When I arrived in this city seven years ago, the old Knights of Pythias Temple, the Deep Ellum landmark that was once the epicenter of Black commercial life in Dallas, was a derelict block of a building, lonely and whitewashed. Its languishing state was especially troubling to preservationists, who feared its deterioration and eventual removal in the churn of “progress.”

That progress has come, and the good news is that the temple still stands. Indeed, its red brick exterior has been conscientiously restored, and its interior meticulously adapted, although in a radically new setting. It is now the front half of the luxury Pittman Hotel — a large addition has been linked behind it to give the hotel an expanded footprint — that, in turn, is part of the mixed-use Epic development.

The red brick exterior of the former Knights of Pythias Temple has been conscientiously restored. Deep Ellum has been subjected to such a paroxysm of luxury development that the advocacy group Preservation Dallas put it on this year’s Most Endangered Historic Places list.
The red brick exterior of the former Knights of Pythias Temple has been conscientiously restored. Deep Ellum has been subjected to such a paroxysm of luxury development that the advocacy group Preservation Dallas put it on this year’s Most Endangered Historic Places list.(Leonid Furmansky / Perkins and Will)

Conceived by the Westdale Company and billed as the Gateway to Deep Ellum, this micro-neighborhood includes the 26-story, 310-unit Hamilton luxury residential tower, the 16-story, 251,000-square-foot Epic office tower, and the 164-room Pittman Hotel. Another commercial tower is under construction, nevermind that the chief tenant of the complex, Uber, has already given up much of its space in the project.

Epic is the mot juste for a complex that is emblematic of changes seen throughout Deep Ellum, which has been subjected to such a paroxysm of luxury development that the advocacy group Preservation Dallas put it on this year’s Most Endangered Historic Places list. The so-called Freedom Colony was established in the wake of the Civil War as a place adjacent to downtown where African Americans could own and operate businesses. It quickly emerged as the commercial and entertainment center of Black Dallas. Its clubs birthed such blues legends as Blind Lemon Jefferson, Huddie “Lead Belly” Ledbetter and Bessie Smith.

Like many Black communities, Deep Ellum was on cheap land adjacent to railroad tracks, which meant it also became a site for industry in the early years of the 20th century. The loft manufacturing buildings of that period define the character of Deep Ellum, and also make it a desirable place for high-end development.

In that context, the Pittman makes for a very comfortable place to have a very uncomfortable conversation about race, erasure, appropriation and urban development.

A view juxtaposing part of the facade of a new building (left) with the historic building (right) at the  Pittman Hotel in Dallas. The original historic building (right) near Elm Street and Good Latimer Expressway in Deep Ellum was designed by architect William Sidney Pittman. The building was originally the Knights of Pythias Temple.
A view juxtaposing part of the facade of a new building (left) with the historic building (right) at the Pittman Hotel in Dallas. The original historic building (right) near Elm Street and Good Latimer Expressway in Deep Ellum was designed by architect William Sidney Pittman. The building was originally the Knights of Pythias Temple.(Leonid Furmansky / Perkins and Will)

The hotel draws its name from its architect, William Sidney Pittman, the first Black architect to win a commission from the

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