Tag: couldnt

Data show Americans couldn’t resist Thanksgiving travel

Americans couldn’t resist the urge to gather for Thanksgiving, driving only slightly less than a year ago and largely ignoring the pleas of public health experts, who begged them to forgo holiday travel to help contain the COVID-19 pandemic, data from roadways and airports show.

The nation’s unwillingness to tamp down on travel offered a warning in advance of Christmas and New Year’s as virus deaths and hospitalizations hit new highs a week after Thanksgiving. U.S. deaths from the outbreak eclipsed 3,100 on Thursday, obliterating the single-day record set last spring.

Vehicle travel in early November was as much as 20% lower than a year earlier, but it surged around the holiday and peaked on Thanksgiving Day at only about 5% less than the pandemic-free period in 2019, according to StreetLight Data, which provided an analysis to the Associated Press.

“People were less willing to change their behavior than any other day during the pandemic,” said Laura Schewel, founder of StreetLight Data.

Airports also saw some of their busiest days of the pandemic, though air travel was much lower than last year. The Transportation Security Administration screened more than 1 million passengers on four separate days during the Thanksgiving travel period. Since the pandemic gutted travel in March, there has been only one other day when the number of travelers topped 1 million — Oct. 18.

“If only a small percentage of those travelers were asymptomatically infected, this can translate into hundreds of thousands of additional infections moving from one community to another,” Dr. Cindy Friedman, a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention official, said this week during a briefing.

Wide swaths of the country saw a sudden influx of people arriving from university campuses in the days leading up to the holiday, according to a data visualization of anonymous cellphone data from a firm called Tectonix.

The CDC has urged people to stay home for the holidays, but officials acknowledged that many people would not heed that advice and advised them to get tested before and after trips. Friedman said that this year’s holidays presented “tough choices” for many families.

The travelers included some elected officials who preached against trips. The mayors of Denver and Austin, Texas, faced fierce backlashes for traveling after telling other people to stay home.

Others had no regrets. Trananda Graves, who runs a travel planning company in Keller, Texas, took a Thanksgiving road trip with her family to Nashville. It was a chance for her daughter to connect with relatives as they shared recipes, and Graves said everyone’s mood was uplifted.

“It was just a break to get away from home,” Graves said. “We work at home, we go to school at home.”

She decided to drive to meet extended family after seeing that flights were crowded and said her family followed guidance to avoid spreading infections.

But infections, even from small Thanksgiving gatherings, have begun to stream in around the country, adding another burden to health departments that are already overwhelmed.

“This uptick

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Data shows Americans couldn’t resist Thanksgiving travel

FILE - In this Nov. 25, 2020, file photo, air travelers line up to go through a a security checkpoint at Salt Lake City International Airport in Salt Lake City. Data from roadways and airports shows millions could not resist the urge to gather on Thanksgiving, even during a pandemic.

FILE – In this Nov. 25, 2020, file photo, air travelers line up to go through a a security checkpoint at Salt Lake City International Airport in Salt Lake City. Data from roadways and airports shows millions could not resist the urge to gather on Thanksgiving, even during a pandemic.

AP

Americans couldn’t resist the urge to gather for Thanksgiving, driving only slightly less than a year ago and largely ignoring the pleas of public health experts, who begged them to forgo holiday travel to help contain the coronavirus pandemic, data from roadways and airports shows.

The nation’s unwillingness to tamp down on travel offered a warning in advance of Christmas and New Year’s as virus deaths and hospitalizations hit new highs a week after Thanksgiving. U.S. deaths from the outbreak eclipsed 3,100 on Thursday, obliterating the single-day record set last spring.

Vehicle travel in early November was as much as 20% lower than a year earlier, but it surged around the holiday and peaked on Thanksgiving Day at only about 5% less than the pandemic-free period in 2019, according to StreetLight Data, which provided an analysis to The Associated Press.

“People were less willing to change their behavior than any other day during the pandemic,” said Laura Schewel, founder of StreetLight Data.

Airports also saw some of their busiest days of the pandemic, though air travel was much lower than last year. The Transportation Security Administration screened more than 1 million passengers on four separate days during the Thanksgiving travel period. Since the pandemic gutted travel in March, there has been only one other day when the number of travelers topped 1 million — Oct. 18.

“If only a small percentage of those travelers were asymptomatically infected, this can translate into hundreds of thousands of additional infections moving from one community to another,” Dr. Cindy Friedman, a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention official, said this week during a briefing.

Wide swaths of the country saw a sudden influx of people arriving from university campuses in the days leading up to the holiday, according to a data visualization of anonymous cellphone data from a firm called Tectonix.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has urged people to stay home for the holidays, but officials acknowledged that many people would not heed that advice and advised them to get tested before and after trips. Friedman said that this year’s holidays presented “tough choices” for many families.

The travelers included some elected officials who preached against trips. The mayors of Denver and Austin, Texas, faced fierce backlashes for traveling after telling other people to stay home.

Others had no regrets. Trananda Graves, who runs a travel-planning company in Keller, Texas, took a Thanksgiving road trip with her family to Nashville, Tennessee. It was a chance for her daughter to connect with relatives as they shared recipes, and Graves said everyone’s mood was uplifted.

“It was just a break to get away from home,” Graves said.

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Data shows Americans couldn’t resist Thanksgiving travel

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — Americans couldn’t resist the urge to gather for Thanksgiving, driving only slightly less than a year ago and largely ignoring the pleas of public health experts, who begged them to forgo holiday travel to help contain the coronavirus pandemic, data from roadways and airports shows.



FILE - In this Nov. 25, 2020, file photo, air travelers line up to go through a a security checkpoint at Salt Lake City International Airport in Salt Lake City. Data from roadways and airports shows millions could not resist the urge to gather on Thanksgiving, even during a pandemic. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)


© Provided by Associated Press
FILE – In this Nov. 25, 2020, file photo, air travelers line up to go through a a security checkpoint at Salt Lake City International Airport in Salt Lake City. Data from roadways and airports shows millions could not resist the urge to gather on Thanksgiving, even during a pandemic. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)

The nation’s unwillingness to tamp down on travel offered a warning in advance of Christmas and New Year’s as virus deaths and hospitalizations hit new highs a week after Thanksgiving. U.S. deaths from the outbreak eclipsed 3,100 on Thursday, obliterating the single-day record set last spring.

Vehicle travel in early November was as much as 20% lower than a year earlier, but it surged around the holiday and peaked on Thanksgiving Day at only about 5% less than the pandemic-free period in 2019, according to StreetLight Data, which provided an analysis to The Associated Press.

“People were less willing to change their behavior than any other day during the pandemic,” said Laura Schewel, founder of StreetLight Data.

Airports also saw some of their busiest days of the pandemic, though air travel was much lower than last year. The Transportation Security Administration screened more than 1 million passengers on four separate days during the Thanksgiving travel period. Since the pandemic gutted travel in March, there has been only one other day when the number of travelers topped 1 million — Oct. 18.



FILE - In this Nov. 24, 2020, file photo, air travelers arriving at Midway Airport in Chicago are reminded of the city's COVID-19 travel orders. Data from roadways and airports shows millions could not resist the urge to gather on Thanksgiving, even during a pandemic. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast, File)


© Provided by Associated Press
FILE – In this Nov. 24, 2020, file photo, air travelers arriving at Midway Airport in Chicago are reminded of the city’s COVID-19 travel orders. Data from roadways and airports shows millions could not resist the urge to gather on Thanksgiving, even during a pandemic. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast, File)

“If only a small percentage of those travelers were asymptomatically infected, this can translate into hundreds of thousands of additional infections moving from one community to another,” Dr. Cindy Friedman, a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention official, said this week during a briefing.

Wide swaths of the country saw a sudden influx of people arriving from university campuses in the days leading up to the holiday, according to a data visualization of anonymous cellphone data from a firm called Tectonix.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has urged people to stay home for the holidays, but officials acknowledged that many people would not heed that advice and advised them to get tested before and after trips. Friedman said that this year’s holidays presented “tough choices” for many families.

The travelers included some elected officials who preached against trips. The mayors of Denver and Austin, Texas, faced fierce backlashes for traveling after telling other

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The director of ‘Home Alone’ says he walked off ‘Christmas Vacation’ because he ‘couldn’t make the movie with Chevy Chase’



Chevy Chase et al. sitting at a table: "National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation." National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation/Warner Bros.


© National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation/Warner Bros.
“National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation.” National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation/Warner Bros.

  • Chris Columbus told Insider what led him to him directing “Home Alone.”
  • The director was hired to helm “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation,” but didn’t get along with its star Chevy Chase.
  • That opened the door for him to make another Christmas classic, “Home Alone.”
  • “The rest is history,” Columbus said.
  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

By the 1990s, Chris Columbus had already made a name for himself in Hollywood thanks to penning scripts for classics such as “Gremlins” and “The Goonies.” But switching to directing films was a challenge.

After his debut, the impressive “Adventures in Babysitting” in 1987, Columbus directed the flop “Heartbreak Hotel” a year later. His next movie — “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation” — would be a make-or-break moment for Columbus. 

Still, that turned out to be a mistake.

The comedy franchise, led by its star Chevy Chase as Clark Griswold, the family man driven to give his kids amazing vacations only to fail hilariously, was set up to do a holiday movie in which the Griswolds host Christmas.

Producer John Hughes, best known for classics “The Breakfast Club,” and “Ferris Bueller’s Day Off,” brought on Columbus to direct. But even before cameras could roll Columbus came to the realization that he could not work with Chase.

“It was fraught with pain and tension with Chevy Chase, but I needed the job desperately,” Columbus told Insider.

Chase had a reputation for being difficult to work with. In fact, it had gone all the way back to when he was one of the original cast members of “Saturday Night Live.” 



Chris Columbus wearing glasses and smiling at the camera: Chris Columbus. Slaven Vlasic/Getty


© Slaven Vlasic/Getty
Chris Columbus. Slaven Vlasic/Getty

Despite needing the work, the director decided to exit the project and eventually Jeremiah S. Chechik took the coveted gig.

“At the time I was living with my wife’s parents,” Columbus admitted. “It took everything in my power to convince myself to resign from ‘Christmas Vacation’ because I couldn’t make the movie with Chevy Chase.” 

But two weeks after leaving “Christmas Vacation,” Columbus got a call from Hughes.

“He sends me two scripts and I thankfully chose ‘Home Alone,'” Columbus recalled. “The rest is history.”

Columbus still doesn’t know why Hughes came back to him after he bailed on the producer’s other movie. Looking back, Columbus thinks maybe Hughes was impressed by his bold decision to leave a movie with a built in audience as “Christmas Vacation” would go on to be one of the most popular titles in the franchise. 



a close up of a child wearing a hat: "Home Alone." Fox


© Fox
“Home Alone.” Fox


Still, Columbus was grateful for the second chance.

“A producer can lose faith in their director if he says, ‘I can’t handle this guy,'” Columbus said. “That can show fear, but John didn’t waver.”

And the result was huge for both men, but especially for Columbus.

“[Late actor] Paul Newman once told me making a living in this business is a combination of luck and talent and I really

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