Tag: Coronavirus

Amid coronavirus surge, Maryland survey shows many still plan Thanksgiving travel

With coronavirus cases surging in the region, and deaths on the rise, a survey from the University of Maryland Medical System finds that 4 in 10 Marylanders were unwilling to change their in-person Thanksgiving plans because of the coronavirus.

Elected leaders and public health officials from throughout the region and across the country have tightened restrictions in recent days and implored residents not to celebrate the holiday with anyone outside their immediate household.

But the online survey, conducted Nov. 16-23 among 525 residents in central and Southern Maryland and on the Eastern Shore, found that 44 percent said they were not altering Thanksgiving or other holiday plans.

David Marcozzi, a physician who led the project, said the results dismayed him.

“It’s disappointing, the lack of recognition that this virus will not take a holiday, it’s silently waiting for an opportunity to spread between us,” he said. “We’re setting ourselves up for a perfect storm. … You have the potential for multiple small superspreader events.”

The survey, which has a margin of error of 4.9 percent, did not include Montgomery County, which is Maryland’s most populous jurisdiction, or the western panhandle of the state. But it did include Prince George’s County in the Washington region, as well as Baltimore.

Respondents in more rural areas were less likely to say they have canceled in-person holiday plans than those in central Maryland. Women, older adults and those with higher education levels were more likely to have changed holiday plans.

[Planning a Thanksgiving trip? Many in the D.C. region are staying put]

In Montgomery, officials on Wednesday pleaded with residents to avoid large gatherings over the holiday and warned that authorities would be ramping up enforcement of physical distancing rules. The county reported 383 new coronavirus infections, bringing its seven-day average to triple what it was a month ago.

“We have broken records time and time again in the past week,” Health Officer Travis Gayles said at a briefing. “If I’m sounding bleak or sounding concerned, it’s because we certainly are.”

Earl Stoddard, head of emergency management, said county police will join state police in patrolling high-density areas such as Silver Spring and Bethesda to ensure that businesses and individuals comply with health orders.

Since the start of the pandemic, the county has levied $500 fines on businesses 30 times for violating physical distancing or mask-wearing requirements, Stoddard said. Officials have also closed or suspended seven businesses for a time.

Gayles said community transmission of the virus has become so widespread in the county that it is increasingly difficult to conduct contact tracing. Officials said they are seeing a growing number of cases associated with family gatherings, youth sports, indoor dining and houses of worship.

“It would be easier if there was one type of activity we could isolate,” Gayles said, “but there’s lots of different possibilities now.”

[Coronavirus cases and metrics in D.C., Maryland and Virginia]

In the District, acting D.C. city administrator Kevin Donahue told members of the D.C. Council on

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Millions travel for Thanksgiving despite coronavirus, leaving public health experts ‘stunned’

Tens of millions of Americans are ignoring the advice of public health experts and plan to travel for Thanksgiving, according to the latest updates.



a group of people walking down the street: BOSTON, MA. NOVEMBER 22: A few travelers in the open section of Terminal A Sunday, November 22, 2020, in a sparsely occupied Logan Airport in Boston. (Jim Michaud / MediaNews Group/Boston Herald)


© Provided by Boston Herald
BOSTON, MA. NOVEMBER 22: A few travelers in the open section of Terminal A Sunday, November 22, 2020, in a sparsely occupied Logan Airport in Boston. (Jim Michaud / MediaNews Group/Boston Herald)

“I have been stunned to see the reports of lines of travelers in airports,” Boston University professor Davidson Hamer said.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued a travel advisory urging “postponing travel” plans as coronavirus cases surge.

Yet Sunday was the busiest day for air travel since the pandemic began, with 1.04 million travelers, according to the U.S. Transportation and Security Administration.

Though the numbers are still less than half those for travelers who flew last year for what’s traditionally the busiest travel season of the year, AAA predicts 50 million people will travel by plane, train or automobile this Thanksgiving. That’s down from 55 million last year.

Already travel volume is creeping up across New England. The region’s six airports, the largest of which is Boston Logan International Airport, have seen about 25,000 passengers per day since Friday. Air travel from the six airports spiked 23% on Friday, 71% on Saturday and 25% on Sunday. Monday was a lighter day with 20,000 passengers, according to the TSA.

Spokesman Daniel Velez said the agency expects “similar numbers” between Thanksgiving and Sunday.

A projected 10% dip in travelers is based on October metrics and is likely to be even bigger as Americans watch cases grow and heed warnings from public health officials, said Mary Maguire, director of public and legislative affairs for AAA Northeast.

“The wait-and-see travel trend continues to impact final travel decisions, especially for the Thanksgiving holiday,” she said.

On Friday the U.S. set a record, reporting 204,000 new coronavirus cases in a single day. Massachusetts, too, is seeing a spike in cases. The number of new daily cases has consistently surpassed 2,000 per day over the past week, according to public health data.

“Right now, with the large amount of SARS-CoV-2 circulating in many communities, people need to be really cautious when traveling. The potential congestion that they may encounter waiting to board a plane, train or bus and the close proximity of seating — all of these things increase the likelihood of transmission,” said Hamer, an infectious disease specialist.

“And masks don’t 100% protect you,” he added.

Gov. Charlie Baker and local health officials are asking people to celebrate Thanksgiving with only the members of their household. In an effort to curb informal gatherings, which he has blamed for fueling the contagion in Massachusetts, the governor has capped indoor gatherings at 10 people.

Anyone traveling to Massachusetts, with the exception of people coming from Vermont or Hawaii, must either quarantine for 14 days or have a negative result on a COVID-19 test administered within 72 hours of their arrival, according to the state’s travel

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Hotel workers struggle amid coronavirus resurgence

NEW YORK (CNN) – The coronavirus pandemic has devastated the hotel industry in the U.S.

Many properties remain closed, and thousands of people that worked in hospitality are unemployed. With the holidays approaching, the impact is even more painful.

Jesus Morales looks forward to the bustle of the holidays at Chicago’s historic Drake Hotel. Customer demands and long hours are tiring – but financially rewarding.

“Last year I was making good money. But it’s gone. I don’t know when I’m going back to work,” Morales said.

This year, there’s no holiday bonus. He’s worked here for 33 years but was furloughed in March.

The Drake is one of Chicago’s top hotels, where highly-trained employees serve an elite clientele. But this year, there are very few of both.

“My savings is gone. My under the pillow money is gone.” Morales said.

The hotel industry has lost more than 650,000 jobs during the pandemic, with 4 in 10 hotel workers like Morales, still out of work.

These last few months have been taxing – emotionally and financially. His daughter is recovering from an accident, and his wife needs daily medication.

“I don’t have health insurance right now. My insurance ran out like a month ago. To get my insurance, it cost about $1,200 a month, and there’s just no way I can pay that,” he said.

In New York, iconic hotels are shutting their doors. The Plaza is temporarily closed, the Roosevelt permanently, and the Fitzpatrick Grand Central Hotel is running at 15% occupancy, while sister hotel is shuttered.

“It’s very eerie. It is costing a lot of money to stay closed, and every month it’s just drain, drain drain. Its just in your blood. As a hotelier, you never close your front door,” said John Fitzpatrick, owner of Fitzpatrick Hotels North America.

Just 25 of Fitzpatrick’s 175 employees are working.

Bilal Yayla was recently called back to tend the bar, but he says without tips, his income has dropped by more than 50%.

“I was out of work for, uh, almost three months also,” he said. “We lost our insurance, and I have had two babies at home.”

In Miami, Jenny Brody has won awards as an elite concierge at the St. Regis Bal Harbor, but she and her husband were both furloughed from their hotel jobs in March.

He found a temporary job in October. She’s still looking.

“You just kind of go into panic mode, like, ‘Did we save enough for this rainy day?’ so to speak, but really, 2020 is becoming … a rainy year.” Brody said.

At the end of this year, dozens of federal protections for those out of work expire. For millions of americans like Morales, it is not the new year he was expecting.

“Since I was 17 I have been working at least two jobs until now, so I’ve been paying taxes for 46 years. You are trying to be the best citizen of the United States that you can, and it’s just

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Thanksgiving Holiday Travel Starts to Climb as Coronavirus Outbreak Worsens | National News

More people than ever during the pandemic are traveling for the Thanksgiving holiday, despite federal government recommendations against doing so.

The Transportation Security Administration recorded over 3 million people passing through airport security across the country during the three-day period of Friday, Saturday and Sunday. Still, that’s fewer than half the travelers recorded during the same timeframe last year.

The weekend numbers peaked on Sunday at 1,047,934.

“It was the highest since the steep decline due to the pandemic and the second time in three days that checkpoint volume surpassed 1 million,” TSA spokeswoman Lisa Farbstein tweeted.

Cartoons on the Coronavirus

The previous record of airline travelers during the pandemic was the Sunday after Columbus Day weekend in October.

TSA Administrator David Pekoske last week said that he expects the Wednesday before Thanksgiving and the Sunday after to see the largest numbers of travelers.

In updated guidance, the agency recommended celebrating the holiday either virtually or with those in the household, which it defines as “anyone who currently lives and shares common spaces in your housing unit.”

“People who do not currently live in your housing unit, such as college students who are returning home from school for the holidays, should be considered part of different households,” the CDC said.

The guidance does not take issue with the act of flying itself, saying “most viruses and other germs do not spread easily on flights because of how air circulates and is filtered on airplanes.”

But a plane packed with passengers could be a different circumstance.

The agency said “social distancing is difficult on crowded flights, and sitting within 6 feet of others, sometimes for hours, may increase your risk of getting COVID-19.”

It also notes that air travel can involve close contact with other people through spending time in security lines and terminals.

The U.S. is headed toward documenting 200,000 coronavirus cases in a single day. Fatalities are also trending upward, with the country recording over 2,000 deaths in a single day last week for the first time since May.

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Coronavirus: Bali hotel rooms on sale for as little as $14 a night as Australians look to holidays

Bali hotels have slashed prices on rooms in a desperate bid to revive tourism during the coronavirus pandemic, with some lucky Australians soon able to escape their home nation for a break.

The once bustling tourist mecca has become a deserted ghost town, forcing accommodation operators to rethink their survival strategy and send their prices plummeting. 

With the holiday island set to reopen to international visitors at the start of 2021 – just six weeks away – it means incredible bargains have become available to eager holidaymakers. 

Operators in the town of Ubud have slashed normal rates by up to 50 per cent, where a room costs as little as A$14 a night and meals as cheap as 48 cents.

As soon as Bali opens up, Australians can seek government approval to take advantage of the bargain deals if they’re willing to meet strict criteria.

Businesses in Ubud (pictured), popular with Australian tourists, are offering some huge discounts on hotels as they struggle to make ends meet during the pandemic

Businesses in Ubud (pictured), popular with Australian tourists, are offering some huge discounts on hotels as they struggle to make ends meet during the pandemic

Former Australian Bachelorette Anna Heinrich at Finns Beach club in Bali. More than a million Australians travel to Indonesia each year and make up more than a quarter of Bali tourists

Former Australian Bachelorette Anna Heinrich at Finns Beach club in Bali. More than a million Australians travel to Indonesia each year and make up more than a quarter of Bali tourists

Many Bali hotels now rent rooms on a weekly and monthly basis rather than per night, helpfully meeting Australia’s requirement that travellers leave for at least three months.

‘We’re targeting long stay guests, for monthly or even annual rent with a 50 per cent  discount than the normal rate,’ Ubud Homestay Association head Ida Bagus Wiryawan told the Bali Sun. 

A stay at Pillow Inn Ubud cost $58 per night pre-COVID but has since halved to $29, which includes breakfast.  

Luxury resort The Yoga Amertham Retreat & Resort has been forced to rely on Indonesian tourists during tough economic times, and are now offering a one-night stay that once cost $24 per night for just $14.  

‘The meals start from 35 cents per portion and for swimming in our pool we only charge $2 per person,’ Kadek Rudiantara said.

A search of Ubud hotels on booking.com reveals another ten venues with prices under $10 per night.

Flights in early January, when the country has flagged it is likely to open to international tourists, are on offer for as little as $774 return.

Many resorts in the town of Ubud have slashed prices on hotel rooms by 50 per cent (pictured, the Pillow Inn Ubud - which is offering room and breakfast for just $29 a night)

Many resorts in the town of Ubud have slashed prices on hotel rooms by 50 per cent (pictured, the Pillow Inn Ubud – which is offering room and breakfast for just $29 a night)

Travellers can still fly abroad if they prove to the Australian government that they plan to be away for three months or more (pictured, a family in  Melbourne on Monday flying to Sydney)

Travellers can still fly abroad if they prove to the Australian government that they plan to be away for three months or more (pictured, a family in  Melbourne on Monday flying to Sydney)

Indonesia closed its international borders in April which crippled the Balinese economy, normally almost entirely dependent on foreign tourism. 

Bali Governor Wayan Koster recently announced that the reopening of Bali for international tourism would be delayed until the start of next year.

It comes after he originally announced the island

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Coronavirus cuts off travel to total solar eclipse in Chile, Argentina

If it sounds like an otherworldly experience, that’s because it’s sure to be. And it’s one that thousands have eagerly been preparing for leading up to a Dec. 14 total solar eclipse that will track across Chile and Argentina.

But virtually none will be able to go, thanks to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Both countries have sealed their borders to international tourism and show no signs of reversing that decision before the once-in-a-lifetime celestial spectacle.

Even veteran eclipse chasers such as Jay Pasachoff, a professor of astronomy at Williams College say this year’s eclipse is far from a routine venture for those even able to go.

“This year is the worst,” Pasachoff said.

He’s one of three people globally to hold the world record for eclipse-chasing, having witnessed 35 total solar eclipses since his first in 1959. That one, which he and fellow classmates in his freshman seminar viewed from a plane, left him hooked on what would be a lifelong addiction.

“Each time it gets better and better,” he said.

A total solar eclipse meets a meteor shower

Solar eclipses are something that have to be seen to be understood. Astronomers and stargazers alike routinely travel tens of thousands of miles across the world, all in hopes of basking in the moon’s shadow for mere minutes, every few years. There’s a reason for it, and most struggle to put it into words.

Some make a tradition of chasing eclipses around the globe, each rendezvous with the solar “corona,” or the sun’s atmosphere, like a familiar meeting with an old friend. Totality during December’s total solar eclipse will last just over two minutes, the fleeting phenomenon most spectacular shortly after 1 p.m. local time.

“If you add up all the eclipses I’ve seen, I’ve worked on 75 eclipses — annual and partial,” Pasachoff said.

“All the people just cheer as the diamond-ring effect happens and it goes into totality,” he said. “It’s such a moving thing.”

Meanwhile, the Geminid meteor shower, which could slingshot dozens of shooting stars across the sky every hour, will have just peaked — meaning sporadic green meteors may make an appearance when the sun goes dark.

Included in the path are the northern fringes of Patagonia, a South American region known for its natural beauty. It’s home to desert, volcanoes, the Andes Mountains, glaciers and breathtaking fjords.

Major travel hurdles

A number of travel agencies offered combined sightseeing and eclipse tours, scouting out locations to build an itinerary years in advance. In the past several months, however, they have been forced to cancel their trips.

A state of emergency in Chile exists until at least Dec. 11, and Americans aren’t permitted to enter until further notice. In fact, only Chilean citizens and residents are allowed in the country, and, if arriving from an international location, are required to quarantine in Santiago for two weeks.

The same is true in Argentina, where the U.S. embassy has listed the country as being at a Level 4 out

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As U.S. coronavirus cases soar toward 200,000 a day, holiday travel is surging

Total coronavirus infections in the United States have topped 12 million, and cases are approaching 200,000 in a day, as health experts warn of an alarming new stage in the pandemic’s spread while Americans embark on holiday travel that could seed more outbreaks.



a group of people standing in an airport: Travelers retrieve their luggage at Newark International Airport on Saturday in Newark The CDC has advised that people stay home for the Thanksgiving holiday. (Photo by Kena Betancur / AFP)


© Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images
Travelers retrieve their luggage at Newark International Airport on Saturday in Newark The CDC has advised that people stay home for the Thanksgiving holiday. (Photo by Kena Betancur / AFP)

A fall wave of the virus ushered in by colder weather is only worsening, outpacing expansions in testing and making new nationwide records routine. The country passed 11 million cases just a week ago, and daily infections are on track to double since Nov. 4, when they exceeded 100,000 for the first time.

As Anthony S. Fauci, the country’s top infectious-disease expert, put it recently on MSNBC: “It’s almost exponential when you compare the curves in the spring and the curves in the summer with the inflection of the curve where we are right now.”

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended Thursday against traveling and congregating for Thanksgiving, using its first news briefing in months to sound alarms over the massive case rise reported in the past week. The United States has surpassed a quarter-million deaths related to covid-19.

But more than 1 million people still passed through the country’s airports Friday in the second-highest single-day rush of travelers since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, even as air travel has dropped dramatically over this time last year. On the same date in 2019, more than 2.5 million people traveled through U.S. airports.

The data on Transportation Security Administration screenings shows that many Americans are heeding calls for caution. But the fallout from this week is expected to amp up pressure on hospitals and health care workers at a critical time in the pandemic. Hospitalizations have soared to all-time highs, pushing state after state to enact new restrictions such as mask mandates, curfews and renewed business shutdowns.

“The scary news is that this week will probably have the highest amount of travel we have seen since the pandemic began,” said Christopher Worsham, a critical care physician and research fellow at Harvard Medical School.

He said he is more worried about what will happen when travelers get to their destinations — and as people from different households gather indoors, where the virus can spread more easily, often with more vulnerable older family members. Worsham said he has been hearing about people being treated as “the bad guy” for trying to keep their relatives and communities safe.

“We have to remember that the virus does not care that it is the holidays, that you are family, and that you have already gone a long time without seeing one another — if given opportunities to spread, the virus will spread,” he said.

Some passengers are facing crowded terminals as they wait to board flights. Video of busy seating areas at Phoenix Sky Harbor

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As U.S. coronavirus cases soar, Thanksgiving travel surge amps up

As Anthony S. Fauci, the country’s top infectious-disease expert, put it recently on MSNBC: “It’s almost exponential when you compare the curves in the spring and the curves in the summer with the inflection of the curve where we are right now.”

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended Thursday against traveling and congregating for Thanksgiving, using its first news briefing in months to sound alarms over the massive case rise reported in the past week. The United States has surpassed a quarter-million deaths related to covid-19.

But more than 1 million people still passed through the country’s airports Friday in the second-highest single-day rush of travelers since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, even as air travel has dropped dramatically over this time last year. On the same date in 2019, more than 2.5 million people traveled through U.S. airports.

The data on Transportation Security Administration screenings shows that many Americans are heeding calls for caution. But the fallout from this week is expected to amp up pressure on hospitals and health care workers at a critical time in the pandemic. Hospitalizations have soared to all-time highs, pushing state after state to enact new restrictions such as mask mandates, curfews and renewed business shutdowns.

“The scary news is that this week will probably have the highest amount of travel we have seen since the pandemic began,” said Christopher Worsham, a critical care physician and research fellow at Harvard Medical School.

He said he is more worried about what will happen when travelers get to their destinations — and as people from different households gather indoors, where the virus can spread more easily, often with more vulnerable older family members. Worsham said he has been hearing about people being treated as “the bad guy” for trying to keep their relatives and communities safe.

“We have to remember that the virus does not care that it is the holidays, that you are family, and that you have already gone a long time without seeing one another — if given opportunities to spread, the virus will spread,” he said.

Some passengers are facing crowded terminals as they wait to board flights. Video of busy seating areas at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport made the rounds on social media Friday, as travelers said that the CDC’s guidance a day earlier had either not registered or not made a difference in their decision-making.

“I have a life to live and things to do, so we take necessary precautions,” Curt Vurpillat, who was heading to Chicago, told news outlet AZFamily.

Brandi McRae, an IT asset and capacity manager from South Florida, told The Washington Post she was alarmed to see long security lines and tightly packed clusters of people in the corridors of Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport on Saturday morning.

“It was a bit overwhelming,” said McRae, 31. “It was less crowded as I walked to my gate, but all I could think was that there would be very little way for so many

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‘Travel Bubble’ Between Hong Kong And Singapore Is Delayed Amid COVID-19 Spike : Coronavirus Updates : NPR

In this Oct. 9, 2020, photo, people walk down a street in Hong Kong. Singapore and Hong Kong have postponed a planned air travel bubble meant to boost tourism amid a spike in coronavirus infections in Hong Kong.

Kin Cheung/AP


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In this Oct. 9, 2020, photo, people walk down a street in Hong Kong. Singapore and Hong Kong have postponed a planned air travel bubble meant to boost tourism amid a spike in coronavirus infections in Hong Kong.

Kin Cheung/AP

An arrangement to allow air travelers between Hong Kong and Singapore to forgo quarantine has been delayed after Hong Kong reported a spike in coronavirus cases.

Hong Kong announced Saturday a delay of at least two weeks to the air travel bubble as the city confirmed 43 new cases — including 13 cases that officials have not been able to trace.

The bubble, which was originally slated to start Sunday, would allow a limited number of air travelers to avoid quarantine. To qualify, passengers would have to pass two coronavirus tests — both before departure and upon arrival — and fly on one of a select number of flights.

Both cities currently require most travelers to undergo a 14-day quarantine period.

Hong Kong’s Secretary for Commerce and Economic Development, Edward Yau, said the postponement was the “responsible way” forward, the Associated Press reported.

“For any scheme to be successful, they must fulfill the condition of securing public health, and also make sure that both sides would be comfortable and feel safe about the scheme,” Yau said.

Yau said enacting the air travel bubble would be revisited early next month, Reuters reported.

Singapore ‘s transport minister, Ong Ye Kung, said in a Facebook post that the postponement is a “sober reminder that the COVID-19 virus is still with us.”

“I can fully understand the disappointment and frustration of travellers who have planned their trips. But we think it is better to defer from a public health standpoint,” he wrote.

The South China Morning Post reported that the plan would have allowed up to 200 people to fly each day without a quarantine period.

As part of the arrangement, both Hong Kong and Singapore had agreed to suspend the program for two weeks if the number of local untraceable cases exceeded five on a rolling seven-day average. As of Saturday, Hong Kong was at nearly four, according to the AP.

Hong Kong, alongside Singapore, was lauded by public health officials for its response early into the pandemic. In recent days, however, the city has seen a spike in new infections.

At least one health official has warned of an upcoming “fourth wave” of coronavirus cases, Bloomberg News reports, adding that more social restrictions were planned to help contain outbreaks.

In total, Hong Kong has confirmed more than 5,500 cases of the coronavirus according to Johns Hopkins University. Singapore has confirmed more than 58,100 cases.

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Holiday travel during the coronavirus pandemic: How to stay healthy this Thanksgiving

The Transportation Security Administration expects to screen more than 6 million travelers this Thanksgiving week, the kickoff of the holiday season. That’s a sharp drop from last year, when a record 26 million Americans packed their bags and traveled to see loved ones. 

But Americans who are traveling or hosting this year may be placing themselves and others at risk from the coronavirus. Updated guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released Thursday urges Americans to reconsider any plans to travel, amid a surge in COVID-19 cases across the country.

“There’s nothing that is 100% protective unless you stay home alone, or with people who you’ve been in the same pod or protective bubble with,” CBS News chief medical correspondent Dr. Jon LaPook said. “Once you go outside that protective pod, you’re now increasing the risk.”

Still, there are a few precautions travelers can take to protect themselves and the people they’re going to see.

Last Flights From Europe Arrive Ahead Of Travel Ban Announced By President Trump
Passengers wearing masks at Dulles International Airport in Virginia.

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“Appropriately worn masks reduce the spread of COVID-19—particularly given the evidence of pre-symptomatic and asymptomatic transmission of the virus,” the CDC website reads.

Though they are not 100% effective, LaPook said masks are a “powerful tool” that have “been shown to help decrease the risk of not only infecting somebody else, but getting infected yourself.”

“If you don’t wear a mask, maybe you’re gonna be OK, maybe you’ll even be infected and not have symptoms, but you could pass it on to somebody who’s vulnerable, and they could get very sick or even die,” he said.

Masks should be worn at any travel hubs and while on any public transportation, where people “can’t avoid crowds.”

Since the coronavirus pandemic began in March, the TSA has only once screened 1 million people in a 24-hour period. Over the holiday week they expect two of its busiest days to top that number. 

In addition to masks, LaPook said face shields and washing hands consistently is highly encouraged.


CDC urges against traveling for holidays

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Despite a rise in airport travel expected over the holiday week, many Americans’ traditional mode of Thanksgiving transport may prove to be safer — driving.

“If you hop into a car, and you’re in the car with people in your own pod, your protective bubble who you know have not been outside it, then you can go from point A to point B safely,” LaPook said.

However, those traveling by car should still be aware they can still pose a risk to others, given the virus’ incubation period.

“The incubation period is two to 14 days… remember, if I get infected today, I will not become infectious, able to infect somebody else, for two to 14 days,” LaPook said. “So I could get tested every day… and be negative, then suddenly, five or six days after I’m infected, become infectious.”

In addition to being mindful of the coronavirus’ incubation period, the CDC recommends travelers get a flu shot before

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