Tag: Considers

White House considers lifting European travel restrictions, Reuters reports

The White House is considering rescinding entry bans for most non-U.S. citizens who recently were in Brazil, Britain, Ireland and 26 other European countries, five U.S. and airline officials told Reuters.

The Trump administration imposed the bans in a bid to contain the novel coronavirus pandemic. It is not considering lifting separate entry bans on most non-U.S. citizens who have recently been in China or Iran, the officials said.

The plan has won the backing of White House coronavirus task-force members, public health and other federal agencies, the people briefed on the matter said, but President Donald Trump has not made a final decision and the timing remains uncertain.

The White House, Department of Homeland Security and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) did not comment.

Many administration officials argue the restrictions no longer make sense given that most countries around the world are not subject to the entry ban. They contend lifting the restrictions would be a boost to struggling U.S. airlines, which have seen international travel fall by 70%, according to airline industry data.

Trump may still opt not to lift the restrictions, given the high number of coronavirus infections in Europe. One potential hurdle is the fact that European countries are not likely to immediately allow most Americans to resume visits, officials said.

The European countries that are subject to the U.S. entry restrictions include the 26 members of the Schengen area that allow travel across open borders.

The U.S. restrictions barring most visitors from Europe have been in place since mid-March, while the Brazilian entry ban was imposed in May. Trump implemented the first ban on most non-U.S. visitors from China on Jan. 31 and then added Iran in February.

The restrictions bar entry of most non-U.S. residents who have been in those countries in the previous 14 days, but the U.S. State Department has been granting some “national interest exceptions” to allow travelers from Europe related to “humanitarian travel, public health response, and national security.”

The United States has also approved exceptions for some European business travelers, investors, academics, students and journalists.

Nearly all of Europe still bans most U.S. travelers from visiting, while Britain and Ireland allow American visits but require two-weeks quarantine upon arrival. Brazil allows U.S. travelers.

On Saturday, the CDC issued new travel and testing recommendations for international air travelers recommending they “get tested with a viral test 1-3 days before their flight to reduce spread during travel. Travelers should get tested 3-5 days after travel and stay home for 7 days.”

Airlines for America, a group representing American Airlines, Delta Air Lines, United Airlines Holdings and others, on Tuesday noted it has “been advocating for the federal government to set a national standard on testing in order to lift travel restrictions.”

In a statement to Reuters, the group called the CDC guidance a step in the right direction, adding that they hoped it would be “followed by a recognition that testing can be used to safely reopen borders without

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Exclusive: White House considers lifting European travel restrictions – sources

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The White House is considering rescinding entry bans for most non-U.S. citizens who recently were in Brazil, Britain, Ireland and 26 other European countries, five U.S. and airline officials told Reuters.

FILE PHOTO: Travellers wearing protective face masks make a selfie inside at Paris Charles de Gaulle airport in Roissy, after the U.S. banned travel from Europe, as France grapples with the novel coronavirus, March 12, 2020. REUTERS/Benoit Tessier

The Trump administration imposed the bans in a bid to contain the novel coronavirus pandemic. It is not considering lifting separate entry bans on most non-U.S. citizens who have recently been in China or Iran, the officials said.

The plan has won the backing of White House coronavirus task-force members, public health and other federal agencies, the people briefed on the matter said, but President Donald Trump has not made a final decision and the timing remains uncertain.

The White House, Department of Homeland Security and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) did not comment.

Many administration officials argue the restrictions no longer make sense given that most countries around the world are not subject to the entry ban. They contend lifting the restrictions would be a boost to struggling U.S. airlines, which have seen international travel fall by 70%, according to airline industry data.

Trump may still opt not to lift the restrictions, given the high number of coronavirus infections in Europe. One potential hurdle is the fact that European countries are not likely to immediately allow most Americans to resume visits, officials said.

The European countries that are subject to the U.S. entry restrictions include the 26 members of the Schengen area that allow travel across open borders.

The U.S. restrictions barring most visitors from Europe have been in place since mid-March, while the Brazilian entry ban was imposed in May. Trump implemented the first ban on most non-U.S. visitors from China on Jan. 31 and then added Iran in February.

The restrictions bar entry of most non-U.S. residents who have been in those countries in the previous 14 days, but the U.S. State Department has been granting some “national interest exceptions” to allow travelers from Europe related to “humanitarian travel, public health response, and national security.”

The United States has also approved exceptions for some European business travelers, investors, academics, students and journalists.

Nearly all of Europe still bans most U.S. travelers from visiting, while Britain and Ireland allow American visits but require two-weeks quarantine upon arrival. Brazil allows U.S. travelers.

On Saturday, the CDC issued new travel and testing recommendations for international air travelers recommending they “get tested with a viral test 1-3 days before their flight to reduce spread during travel. Travelers should get tested 3-5 days after travel and stay home for 7 days.”

Airlines for America, a group representing American Airlines, Delta Air Lines, United Airlines Holdings and others, on Tuesday noted it has “been advocating for the federal government to set a national standard on testing in order to

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Exclusive: White House Considers Lifting European Travel Restrictions – Sources | World News

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The White House is considering rescinding entry bans for most non-U.S. citizens who recently were in Brazil, Britain, Ireland and 26 other European countries, five U.S. and airline officials told Reuters.

The Trump administration imposed the bans in a bid to contain the novel coronavirus pandemic. It is not considering lifting separate entry bans on most non-U.S. citizens who have recently been in China or Iran, the officials said.

The plan has won the backing of White House coronavirus task-force members, public health and other federal agencies, the people briefed on the matter said, but President Donald Trump has not made a final decision and the timing remains uncertain.

The White House, Department of Homeland Security and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) did not comment.

Many administration officials argue the restrictions no longer make sense given that most countries around the world are not subject to the entry ban. They contend lifting the restrictions would be a boost to struggling U.S. airlines, which have seen international travel fall by 70%, according to airline industry data.

Trump may still opt not to lift the restrictions, given the high number of coronavirus infections in Europe. One potential hurdle is the fact that European countries are not likely to immediately allow most Americans to resume visits, officials said.

The European countries that are subject to the U.S. entry restrictions include the 26 members of the Schengen area that allow travel across open borders.

The U.S. restrictions barring most visitors from Europe have been in place since mid-March, while the Brazilian entry ban was imposed in May. Trump implemented the first ban on most non-U.S. visitors from China on Jan. 31 and then added Iran in February.

The restrictions bar entry of most non-U.S. residents who have been in those countries in the previous 14 days, but the U.S. State Department has been granting some “national interest exceptions” to allow travelers from Europe related to “humanitarian travel, public health response, and national security.”

The United States has also approved exceptions for some European business travelers, investors, academics, students and journalists.

Nearly all of Europe still bans most U.S. travelers from visiting, while Britain and Ireland allow American visits but require two-weeks quarantine upon arrival. Brazil allows U.S. travelers.

On Saturday, the CDC issued new travel and testing recommendations for international air travelers recommending they “get tested with a viral test 1-3 days before their flight to reduce spread during travel. Travelers should get tested 3-5 days after travel and stay home for 7 days.”

Airlines for America, a group representing American Airlines, Delta Air Lines, United Airlines Holdings and others, on Tuesday noted it has “been advocating for the federal government to set a national standard on testing in order to lift travel restrictions.”

In a statement to Reuters, the group called the CDC guidance a step in the right direction, adding that they hoped it would be “followed by a recognition that testing can be used to safely

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Renton considers vacating Red Lion Hotel sheltering 200 homeless people

The city of Renton and King County are at odds over how to handle the Red Lion Hotel, which currently houses more than 200 homeless people.

Renton city leaders are considering a plan that would force more than 200 homeless people to move elsewhere. The city council is mulling a six-month plan to vacate a hotel-turned-shelter. 

This comes amid disagreements between officials and leaders at the Red Lion Hotel over the hotel’s operation and number of homeless occupants. 

“They moved about 230 homeless individuals of downtown Seattle into a thriving business district in the center of Renton,” said Chip Vincent, administrator for Renton’s Community & Economic Development department. 

He added that there have been several concerns brought to the city by leaders and residents about the recent influx of homeless tenants and how it could affect the city in the future. There have been a number of ordinances proposed to head off any possible issues.

“This is being very humane, but recognizing that these types of facilities have a surrounding impact on the neighborhoods in which they’re located,” Vincent said. 

The Red Lion Hotel and Conference Center in Renton was turned into a homeless shelter in April, shortly after the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. King County officials said hundreds of homeless people were relocated from the Morrison Hotel Shelter in Seattle. At last check, 11,751 people were experiencing homelessness countywide. 

King County officials released a statement, saying in part: “The County has been in conversations with city staff since May 2020 about the need to establish facilities to address COVID-19, yet it was just last week that we learned that the city was considering an ordinance. This short notice period leaves the County, and other stakeholders, without an adequate opportunity to participate in the process of developing this legislation.”

Renton officials insist they are not trying to kick the homeless out, but they simply want the guidelines to be clear.

“More than anything else, it’s really a clarification of our rules given the issues and challenges we’ve faced with the Red Lion,” Vincent said. 

So far, King County and the city of Renton haven’t been able to agree on terms regarding the space. As a result, King County was issued a violation, which they appealed. The case is now in court.

The homeless occupants would not be kicked out this year. If a removal ordinance is passed, the new date would be June 1. 

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BOJ Considers Changing Inflation Forecasts Over Travel Program

(Bloomberg) — The Bank of Japan is likely to consider changing its inflation forecasts to reflect the short-term impact on prices of a government travel campaign at its policy meeting next week, according to people familiar with the matter.

The central bank will probably discuss cutting its price projection for the year ending in March to account for the downward price pressure of Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga’s Go To Travel campaign, the people said. The campaign offers subsidized domestic travel. A downgrade of the projection wouldn’t trigger any additional BOJ action, the people added.

Discussions will also likely look at the upward pressure on overall prices set to take place in a year’s time when the campaign is no longer operating, the people said.



chart: Government's travel discount measures have helped push prices below zero


© Bloomberg
Government’s travel discount measures have helped push prices below zero

The BOJ is likely to play down the lasting impact of the subsidies and will instead emphasize that its overall view of the economy and inflation is largely unchanged even if its projections are tweaked, the people said.

Given the stability of financial markets and availability of funding for companies, the BOJ is likely to stand pat for the time being, they said.

The central bank will release its quarterly economic outlook report along with its policy statement on Oct. 29. Almost all economists surveyed by Bloomberg predict monetary policy to remain unchanged.

Video: Inflation may reach a level not seen in decades. Here’s why. (CNBC)

Inflation may reach a level not seen in decades. Here’s why.

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The travel discounts started in July and have helped drive consumer inflation below zero as hotel prices dropped by more than 30% from a year ago. The campaign has weighed on monthly consumer prices by about 0.4 percentage point. It’s expected to drag CPI down by around 0.2 percentage point in fiscal 2020, according to the ministry of internal affairs.

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CPI Outlook

BOJ

Economists

Fiscal 2020 -0.5% -0.4%
Fiscal 2021 0.3% 0.2%
Fiscal 2022 0.7% 0.5%

The campaign is scheduled to end in January, though some politicians are calling for an extension. It offers a 35% discount on travel packages to spur demand and help the tourism industry and regional economies cushion the effect of the pandemic.

BOJ Governor Haruhiko Kuroda said last month that the bank doesn’t need to worry about the discounts since the impact is only transitory, a view shared by 62% of the polled economists.

Core inflation, currently -0.4%, is set to get even weaker toward the end of the year as the upward effect of last year’s sales tax hike drops out of figures, in addition to the lagging impact of oil price drops earlier this year.

(Adds details on travel campaign impact and rundown of current price forecasts)

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