Tag: college

California Gov. Gavin Newsom sets 10 p.m. curfew; CDC discourages travel; 15 college football games canceled this week

The U.S. death toll from coronavirus has surpassed 250,000, including 1,700 reported Wednesday alone. Hospitalizations across the nation have exploded, with almost 80,000 Americans now receiving inpatient treatment.

COVID-19 has now killed a quarter of a million Americans

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Happy Thanksgiving? Not so much.

New York canceled its massive Thanksgiving Day parade weeks ago. Houston followed suit and Detroit is planning a virtual event as well.

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Many universities are urging students not to go home for the holidays, concerned about igniting a nationwide burst of new cases. Some schools are suggesting that students that do go home not come back, fearing an outbreak of infections on campus.



a man holding a sign: With a map of the country's COVID-19 outbreak behind her, Dr. Deborah Birx, the White House's coronavirus response coordinator, speaks during a task force briefing on Thursday.


© Susan Walsh, AP
With a map of the country’s COVID-19 outbreak behind her, Dr. Deborah Birx, the White House’s coronavirus response coordinator, speaks during a task force briefing on Thursday.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention chimed in Thursday, recommending Americans simply not travel for the holiday. 

“The tragedy that could happen is that one of your family members is coming to this family gathering and they could end up severely ill, hospitalized or dying,” said Dr. Henry Walke, the CDC’s COVID-19 incident manager. “We don’t want that to happen.”

📈 Today’s numbers: The U.S. has reported more than 11.6 million cases and more than 252,200 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University data. The global totals: 56.7 million cases and 1.35 million deaths.

🗺️ Mapping coronavirus: Track the U.S. outbreak in your state.

This file will be updated throughout the day. For updates in your inbox, subscribe to The Daily Briefing newsletter.

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Atlanta school principal and college professor wife drown on Puerto Rico vacation

An Atlanta-area high school principal and his college professor wife drowned while vacationing in Puerto Rico this week. 

Jamar and Ann Marie Robinson were swimming in the ocean Sunday behind their beach resort hotel near San Juan when Ann Robinson was dragged by rip currents, according to a Puerto Rico news report. Jamar Robinson tried reaching for his wife and they both went under the water, the report said. 

Onlookers unsuccessfully tried to rescue the couple, authorities said. 

“Our hearts are broken for the family of Mr. Robinson and Mrs. Robinson and the entire Westlake community,” Bobby May, a football coach at Westlake High Scool, where Robinson was principal, tweeted. “We will always remember Mr. Robinson as the principal who worked tirelessly, was always upbeat, passionate, never missed a game or event and LOVED his students with a heart that was unmatched.” 

The couple leaves behind two boys, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported. 

A message posted to the school’s website said Robinson “left a legacy of PRIDE that will live on through the faculty members and students that he impacted and encouraged to #BeTheChange.”

Robinson had been principal of the school, located just outside Atlanta city limits, since 2018. He was recognized as an “Outstanding Georgia Citizen” in 2014 and was described by Fulton County Schools as a “passionate leader whose focus on relationship building and transparency has led to significant results for the communities and students that he serves.”

His wife was an assistant political science professor at Georgia State University Perimeter College, the newspaper reported. She was working toward her doctorate when she died. 

Jamar and Ann Robinson drowned while vacationing in Puerto Rico over the weekend 

Jamar and Ann Robinson drowned while vacationing in Puerto Rico over the weekend 
(GoFundMe)

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“She was a beloved and admired member of the faculty and her loss is felt personally and professionally by all of us,” Dean Nancy Kropf told the newspaper in an emailed statement.

Ann Robinson was also known as the “encyclopedia” in her doctorate program because of her intellect and love of learning, the newspaper reported. Funeral arrangements for the couple were pending. 

A New York City couple also drowned while honeymooning in the Caribbean last month. Muhammad Malik, 26, a corporate attorney, and his 29-year-old wife, Dr. Noor Shah, a surgeon, were swimming in chest-high waters at a Turks and Caicos resort on Oct. 28 when they were overcome by strong riptides, the New York Post reported. 

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City of College Station names new Parks & Recreation director

The City of College Station has named the new director of Parks & Recreation. 



a man wearing a suit and tie smiling at the camera


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Steve Wright was announced as the new director Friday and is expected to assume the position by the end of the year. He fills the vacancy left by David Schmitz, who retired in July after serving as director since 2011.

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Wright has more than 40 years of experience in the industry.

Wright worked as the director of Parks & Recreation for three years with the City of Houston and seven years with the YMCA of Greater Houston. He has also served as both CEO and COO of fitness organizations such as Gold’s Gym, World Gym and Mavericks Health Centers. 

Wright earned his Bachelor of Business Administration from Sam Houston State University, and later earned a Master of Arts in kinesiology and a Master of Science in health from SHSU.

At the City of Houston, Wright led a department of 800 employees and a budget of $78 million. 

He oversaw 380 parks, 61 community centers, 38 swimming pools, and myriad courts, courses, fields, facilities and programs.

“Over the past several weeks, we’ve spent considerable time with Steve and have been impressed with his knowledge and experience in the parks industry, as well his leadership and communication skills,” Interim City Manager Jeff Capps said. “We feel strongly that he’ll be a great addition to our College Station team and we look forward to Jodi and him becoming a part of this great community. I also want to extend a special thanks to Assistant Director of Parks Kelly Kelbly, who has done a fantastic job serving as interim director these many months.”

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College Students (And Covid-19) Will Travel Home For Thanksgiving

In keeping with nationwide standardized protocols for Covid-19 testing and safety, when it comes to college campuses, there are none. Two weeks from now, millions of college students will head home for Thanksgiving break. Some will fly, some will drive, and some will take other forms of transportation such as buses and trains. Some are planning on staying at home until early 2021, and some will plan on heading back to campus with millions of others, at the end of the Thanksgiving weekend. While flights have been remarkably empty over recent weeks, in small part due to October/November being off-season for tourism, but in large part due to the pandemic, this may change as Thanksgiving approaches. And while some schools, especially smaller colleges and those in more rural locations, have developed meticulous and tightly-controlled Covid-19 testing, tracing, and isolation protocols, others have taken a much more hands-off approach.

Schools such as Pennsylvania State University have created voluntary “Departure Testing” plans, to ensure that most, if not all, students have completed Covid-19 testing prior to heading home, and they will offer on-campus isolation sites for those students who test positive. Boston University has asked on-campus students to stay put, and highly discourage students to travel home. To avoid an influx of Covid-19 cases coming to campus after the Thanksgiving Break, the University of Arizona will not only offer testing to on-campus students, but they will also revert any currently held in-person classes to remote for the remainder of the Fall semester. If you’re getting the sense that if you’ve seen one college protocol, you haven’t seen ‘em all, you’re right. There are over 5,000 colleges and universities in the U.S., and no two have the same protocol. We need to brace ourselves for a steeper spike in cases in the coming weeks, as a large chunk of the millions of students will mobilize all at once.

Many colleges that are planning on continuing in-person classes after the Thanksgiving break are urging students to stay on campus, have small, physically distanced events with friends, “visit” with family virtually, and well, just hang in there during this challenging time. Many are recommending staying at home if they do, indeed head home. And many are having kids come back to campus.

The American College Health Association has provided the following recommendations, if students do, indeed, decide to travel home:

“The most cautious approach upon arrival home is to quarantine for the first 14 days after arrival. This is especially important if there are vulnerable, higher risk individuals living in the home and/or there is high prevalence on the campus or in the local community surrounding the campus prior to leaving for home.

  • Quarantining in the home includes eating meals in a private space or outdoors with family at least 6 ft apart.
  • Use separate serving ware, utensils, glasses, and
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Police look to identify two people in video from hotel where 7 people were shot near University of Maryland, College Park

Prince George’s County Police are searching for two people of interest in a shooting late Saturday that left seven people injured at a party inside a hotel room near the University of Maryland’s College Park campus.

The victims — all of whom are adults and do not attend the university — suffered non-life-threatening injuries, police said Sunday. Five have been released from the hospital.

The motive for the shooting remains under investigation. Police released photos of two people of interest.

The University of Maryland Police Department announced Sunday night that they have no information at this point that any of the people shot the previous night are affiliated with the university.

Around 11 p.m. Saturday, police responded to The Hotel in the 7700 block of Baltimore Avenue for a shooting at a party in one of the hotel rooms.

Students Emily Garrett and Avery Strobel say they were on their way from their off-campus house to a Halloween party Saturday night when they saw police activity outside The Hotel. The 19-year-old friends from Bel Air did not know what to make of the situation when they saw the lights and sirens.

“It’s scary to think about,” Strobel, a general studies major, said. “That’s a lot of people.”

Garrett, a communications major, said she doesn’t generally feel unsafe. She said the university goes to significant lengths to keep students safe, including with the installation of emergency call boxes throughout the area.

The friends were among a steady flow of students and families who walked through the area on a dreary Sunday, some stopping for food at Potomac Pizza and Bagels ‘N Grinds at the base of The Hotel. Many said they had not heard much about the shooting but called it unsettling.

By the afternoon, there was no obvious police presence at The Hotel and no lingering evidence of a shooting from the lobby or perimeter of the property.

College Park Mayor Patrick Wojahn called the shooting “distressing” and said his thoughts go out to everybody injured, and to their families. In these difficult times, he said, events like the one that took place on Halloween are even more tragic.

“I just hope that everyone pulls out OK,” he said.

Students Chloe Kafka and Tori Lanner walked past The Hotel on their way home to the dorms after brunch Sunday. They said they were taking photos in their Halloween costumes late Saturday when they got an alert from the University of Maryland Police Department that there was an off-campus shooting.

Kafka, an 18-year-old chemistry major from Boston, said she dismissed the alert after glancing at her email, because it did not convey the seriousness of the situation, including that multiple people were injured. A landmark like The Hotel would also have been helpful, because the street address alone didn’t signal to them how close the shooting was to campus.

If they would have had more details Saturday night, Lanner, 18, a communications major from Long Island, New York, said

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University of Maryland Hotel shooting in College Park Maryland

Police say seven people were shot at the hotel party.

COLLEGE PARK, Md. — The University of Maryland and Prince George’s County police forces are looking for two persons of interest linked to the shooting of multiple people at The Hotel at the University of Maryland in College Park, Md. on Halloween night.

The incident happened around 11:05 pm at a party that was taking place in one hotel room at the University of Maryland hotel located in the 7700 block of Baltimore Avenue.

Police said seven people were shot. Five of the injured have since been released from the hospital. The two victims who remain hospitalized suffered non-life-threatening injuries, police said.

Detectives combed through witnesses, evidence and surveillance video to identify the two persons of interest.

UMD police said one of the suspects is a Black man who had a handgun, wore a black jacket that is puffy and carried a black shoulder type of bag with the writing, “super drive” on the side.  

The motive for the shooting remains under investigation.

Police are not sure which direction the suspect left after leaving the hotel.

The Prince George’s County Police Department will take the lead in this case, according to the University of Maryland police in a statement.

Investigators said they would like to talk to anyone with information critical to this case. Anyone with information on this shooting is asked to call 301-699-2601. Callers wishing to remain anonymous may call Crime Solvers at 1-866-411-TIPS, or go online at www.pgcrimesolvers.com, or use the “P3 Tips” mobile app search “P3 Tips” in the Apple Store or Google Play to download the app onto your mobile device. Please refer to case 20-0051097.

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College Station Parks & Recreation handing out free arts and crafts packets to celebrate Day of the Dead

COLLEGE STATION, Texas (KBTX) – The College Station Parks & Recreation Department is handing out free arts and crafts packets all week to celebrate the Mexican holiday Day of the Dead.

The packets are the beginning of a cultural series the department is starting by promoting different traditions in an effort to better understand our friends’ and neighbors’ cultures.

City of College Station Recreation Manager Ana Romero says her own family experiences inspired her to come up with the idea to put the packets together.

“I come from a Mexican background where my family has built alters every year for Day of the Dead, starting with my great-grandma,” Romero said. “It’s just been a tradition that we continue to do in remembrance of everyone who’s not with us anymore.”

Each packet includes a fact sheet about Day of the Dead, coloring sheets, and crafts that capture the spirit of the holiday. People can stop by the CSPR office at Stephen C. Beachy Central Park and pick up as many as they want for their kids between October 26 and 30. Those interested can even call in advance and request someone to bring a packet out to their car.

Day of the Dead, or Día de los Muertos, is a Mexican traditional holiday that celebrates family members and friends who have passed. It is usually celebrated on November 1 and 2. Romero says November 2 tends to be the day where people celebrate with anything that makes them remember those who are not here with us anymore.

“Making any type of food or drinks they used to have or doing any of the things they used to do while they were alive are popular ways to celebrate,” Romero said. “Sometimes, the only way you can remember things like that is when someone in your family who got to meet them tells a story about it, and those are some of the things you get to share with people on November 2.”

Romero says the parks and recreation department plans to make another packet available in February to celebrate Black History Month.

Copyright 2020 KBTX. All rights reserved.

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Trump travel anticipates race decided by one Electoral College vote

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump is spending precious time in the final days of the 2020 campaign in places with just a single Electoral College vote at stake — a sign of just how close an election his campaign is expecting.

With nine days to go, Trump traveled Sunday to Maine, and planned to go to Nebraska on Tuesday. Unlike most states, which tend to utilize a winner-takes-all system, Maine and Nebraska divide up their Electoral College votes, giving two to the winner of the statewide vote and one vote to the winner of each congressional district.

While most of the attention this year has been on traditional battleground states like Florida and Pennsylvania, both campaigns have included Maine and Nebraska — places typically off the beaten campaign path — in their last-minute push, with the Trump team citing possible scenarios where the election could come down to one or two Electoral College votes.

For instance, should Trump manage to hold on to states he won in 2016 other than Michigan, Wisconsin and Arizona, there could be an Electoral College tie. In that scenario, a tie would be broken by the state delegations in the House of Representatives, which are currently majority Republican. Should Trump fail to win that trio of states, along with one of Maine or Nebraska’s congressional districts, he could lose the race by just one Electoral College vote.

In Maine, Biden leads by double digits in recent statewide surveys, according to the NBC poll tracker, and is expected to win Maine’s First Congressional District that includes Portland and Augusta. But the state’s more rural Second Congressional District could come into play — while Trump won it in 2016 it was carried by Obama in 2012 and 2008.

The district “could be pivotal in this election cycle,” said Trump campaign senior adviser Corey Lewandowski in an interview Sunday on Meet the Press.

Trump has spent months trying to win over Maine voters by advocating for the state’s lobster industry. He visited the state in June to hold a roundtable on the lobster industry, invited a Maine lobsterman to speak at the Republican National Convention, and this summer directed his administration to provide lobstermen with bailout money to make up for lost income from his trade war with China.

In Nebraska, Trump is expected to win the popular vote, but Biden has a chance of winning a single vote from Nebraska’s Second Congressional District. A NYT/Siena College poll this month showed Biden leading the district, which includes Omaha and its suburbs, by 7 percentage points.

The district has about the same number of registered Republicans as it does Democrats, and the results could be determined by just a few thousand votes. Trump won the district in 2016 by 6,500 votes and it went to Obama in 2012 by just under 3,500 votes.

The Biden campaign has also been eyeing Maine: Biden’s wife Jill Biden will visit the state on Tuesday, and Kamala Harris’ husband Doug Emhoff

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Trump travel anticipates a race potentially decided by a single Electoral College vote

WASHINGTON — President Donald Trump is spending precious time in the final days of the 2020 campaign in places with just a single Electoral College vote at stake — a sign of just how close an election his campaign is expecting.

With nine days to go, Trump traveled Sunday to Maine, and planned to go to Nebraska on Tuesday. Unlike most states, which tend to utilize a winner-takes-all system, Maine and Nebraska divide up their Electoral College votes, giving two to the winner of the statewide vote and one vote to the winner of each congressional district.

While most of the attention this year has been on traditional battleground states like Florida and Pennsylvania, both campaigns have included Maine and Nebraska — places typically off the beaten campaign path — in their last-minute push, with the Trump team citing possible scenarios where the election could come down to one or two Electoral College votes.

For instance, should Trump manage to hold on to states he won in 2016 other than Michigan, Wisconsin and Arizona, there could be an Electoral College tie. In that scenario, a tie would be broken by the state delegations in the House of Representatives, which are currently majority Republican. Should Trump fail to win that trio of states, along with one of Maine or Nebraska’s congressional districts, he could lose the race by just one Electoral College vote.

In Maine, Biden leads by double digits in recent statewide surveys, according to the NBC poll tracker, and is expected to win Maine’s First Congressional District that includes Portland and Augusta. But the state’s more rural Second Congressional District could come into play — while Trump won it in 2016 it was carried by Obama in 2012 and 2008.

The district “could be pivotal in this election cycle,” said Trump campaign senior adviser Corey Lewandowski in an interview Sunday on Meet the Press.

Trump has spent months trying to win over Maine voters by advocating for the state’s lobster industry. He visited the state in June to hold a roundtable on the lobster industry, invited a Maine lobsterman to speak at the Republican National Convention, and this summer directed his administration to provide lobstermen with bailout money to make up for lost income from his trade war with China.

In Nebraska, Trump is expected to win the popular vote, but Biden has a chance of winning a single vote from Nebraska’s Second Congressional District. A NYT/Siena College poll this month showed Biden leading the district, which includes Omaha and its suburbs, by 7 percentage points.

The district has about the same number of registered Republicans as it does Democrats, and the results could be determined by just a few thousand votes. Trump won the district in 2016 by 6,500 votes and it went to Obama in 2012 by just under 3,500 votes.

The Biden campaign has also been eyeing Maine: Biden’s wife Jill Biden will visit the state on Tuesday, and Kamala Harris’ husband Doug Emhoff was in

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Recreation Management & Policy | College of Health and Human Services

Explore the Department of Recreation Management & Policy

The Department of Recreation Management and Policy provides an academically challenging program of undergraduate, graduate and professional education coupled with a solid foundation of the liberal arts, preparing graduates for a range of professional opportunities in programming, management and clinical service.

NEW – This Fall, the Outdoor Education and Leadership major will merge with the Department of Recreation Management and Policy and transition to the new Outdoor Leadership and Management Option.

This new major option is designed for students interested in outdoor education, adventure programming, outdoor recreation, parks and protected areas, youth and after-school programming, conservation and related professions.  UNH is the leading university in New England for students pursuing careers in the outdoor industry. This option will capitalize on the strengths and assets of the Outdoor Education and Leadership major while expanding into the growing outdoor recreation and resource management fields. Students in this major will earn a bachelor of science in Recreation Management and Policy – Outdoor Leadership and Management.

The outdoor education program at UNH is the oldest continually accredited outdoor leadership major in the country, with an excellent reputation and prominent alumni working in every aspect of the Outdoor Industry.  The Department of Recreation Management and Policy has been accredited with the Council on Accreditation of Parks, Recreation, Tourism and Related Professions since the early 1980s, and is nationally-known for its Therapeutic Recreation and Program and Event Management programs.

View the program sheet

For more information please contact program coordinator Nate Fitch, [email protected]

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