Tag: Citys

Reuben Brothers to Buy New York City’s Surrey Hotel

(Bloomberg) — U.K. real estate investors David and Simon Reuben are buying the upscale Surrey Hotel in New York City, in their latest push into U.S. real estate, according to a person familiar with the matter.



a man standing in front of Simon Reuben, Simon Reuben posing for the camera: Simon and David Reuben


© Photographer: David M. Benett/Getty Images
Simon and David Reuben

The price is less than the $215 million asking price, said the person, who asked to not be identified because the matter isn’t public.

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A representative for the Reuben Brothers declined to comment. A representative for the owner of the Surrey Hotel, Denihan Hospitality Group, didn’t respond to a request for comment.

The tony hotel near Central Park is a recreation of the original Surrey, which was built in 1926 and hosted famous people including John F. Kennedy and Bette Davis, according to its website.

The brothers, London property investors, invested in New York City real-estate this year by buying a condo from SL Green Realty Corp. for $170 million, Bloomberg News reported.

This transaction follows three recent financing deals they did worth more than $300 million, including buying the mortgage of the St. Regis Bal Harbour Resort in Miami, as well as a stake in a senior loan tied to the St. Regis Chicago, the person said.

For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com

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Tokyo governor wants city’s elderly excluded from travel scheme

FILE PHOTO: Tokyo Governor Yuriko Koike wears a protective mask during a news conference about the city’s response to the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak, in Tokyo, Japan November 25, 2020. REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon

TOKYO (Reuters) – Tokyo’s governor asked the government on Tuesday to temporarily exclude Tokyo residents aged over 65 from a scheme encouraging travel and tourism in Japan, saying it could expose them to the coronavirus and result in more severe cases of COVID-19.

The Go To Travel campaign offers subsidies for domestic travel. It has been credited by the Japanese government with boosting the country’s regional economies and helping airlines and other travel companies weather the coronavirus pandemic.

The campaign, however, has come under pressure as Japan encounters a fresh wave of coronavirus infections that some fear could escalate beyond the capacity of hospitals to cope.

“The elderly are more susceptible to becoming severely ill, so from that standpoint we asked for the change,” Yuriko Koike told journalists following a meeting with Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga. “The decision and how to go about it is for the government to make.”

Suga’s government last week agreed to suspend the Go To Travel programme in two cities, Sapporo in northern Japan and Osaka in the west, following a sharp rise in cases.

Japan’s capital on Tuesday reported 372 new cases, the seventh straight day above 300, with 33 COVID deaths nationwide, the most in a single day since the outbreak began, according to public broadcaster NHK.

Economy Minister Yasutoshi Nishimura earlier said the request from Tokyo asked that elderly people be excluded from the travel campaign until Dec 17.

Reporting by Tim Kelly and Daniel Leussink; editing by Andrew Heavens, Larry King

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AHF: Skid Row’s King Edward Hotel Earns City’s Historic Designation

In 2018, the 1906-era Beaux Arts hotel on Skid Row was repurposed by AHF and the Healthy Housing Foundation for use as housing for the homeless and extremely-low-income individuals

Los Angeles City Council grants Historic-Cultural Monument status to the hotel and its King Eddy Saloon, a bar and former speakeasy in continuous operation since the 1930s

The Los Angeles City Council has designated the King Edward Hotel, a 1906-era Beaux Arts hotel, and its King Eddy Saloon, a bar and former speakeasy in continuous operation since the 1930s, status as the newest Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201127005607/en/

The 1906-era King Edward Hotel on L.A.'s Skid Row was repurposed by AHF and its Healthy Housing Foundation for use as housing for the homeless and extremely-low-income individuals. (Graphic: Business Wire)

The 1906-era King Edward Hotel on L.A.’s Skid Row was repurposed by AHF and its Healthy Housing Foundation for use as housing for the homeless and extremely-low-income individuals. (Graphic: Business Wire)

The 150-room hotel, located on the edge of L.A.’s Skid Row, was purchased, refurbished and repurposed by AHF and the Healthy Housing Foundation in 2018 for use as housing for the homeless and extremely-low-income individuals.

“While I am extremely pleased that our City Council designated the King Edward Hotel an official Historic-Cultural Monument—a well-deserved recognition for this beautiful 1906 Beaux Arts hotel located in the heart of Skid Row—I believe what really makes this property historic is its new life repurposed as housing for formerly homeless and extremely-low-income individuals,” said Hon. Kevin de Léon, Los Angeles City Council Member for District 14. “I’ve always said our approach to reducing homelessness must be all hands on deck, so AHF and the Healthy Housing Foundation are to be commended for their innovative and cost-effective approach to address our growing homeless situation via the adaptive reuse of many old hotels and motels like the King Edward, an approach I believe the city and other organizations should get behind.”

The historic designation came via City Council’s adoption of a motion passed on consent calendar at Wednesday’s council meeting (Agenda Item #29—Council File item #20-0736).

According to documents submitted in support of the designation, the Cultural Heritage Commission, in a June 11, 2020 letter and memo to the city’s Planning and Land Use Management Committee (PLUM), recommended that PLUM urge the City Council consider the King Edward Hotel for inclusion in the list of Historic-Cultural Monuments. The Heritage Commission had previously voted unanimously (on May 5, 2020) to recommend Historic-Cultural Monument status. The Cultural Heritage Commission noted:

“The King Edward Hotel meets two of the Historic-Cultural Monument criteria: it “exemplifies significant contributions to the broad cultural, economic or social history of the nation, state, city or community” for its association with the early 20th century development of hotels in Downtown Los Angeles, and as the home of the King Eddy Saloon, a business important to the commercial identity of Downtown Los Angeles that has continuously operated at the property since the 1930s; and it “embodies the distinctive characteristics of a style, type, period, or method of construction” and “represents a notable work of a master designer,

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AHF: Skid Row’s King Edward Hotel Earns City’s Historic Designation

AHF: Skid Row’s King Edward Hotel Earns City’s Historic Designation

In 2018, the 1906-era Beaux Arts hotel on Skid Row was repurposed by AHF and the Healthy Housing Foundation for use as housing for the homeless and extremely-low-income individuals

Los Angeles City Council grants Historic-Cultural Monument status to the hotel and its King Eddy Saloon, a bar and former speakeasy in continuous operation since the 1930s

The Los Angeles City Council has designated the King Edward Hotel, a 1906-era Beaux Arts hotel, and its King Eddy Saloon, a bar and former speakeasy in continuous operation since the 1930s, status as the newest Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201127005607/en/

The 1906-era King Edward Hotel on L.A.’s Skid Row was repurposed by AHF and its Healthy Housing Foundation for use as housing for the homeless and extremely-low-income individuals. (Graphic: Business Wire)

The 150-room hotel, located on the edge of L.A.’s Skid Row, was purchased, refurbished and repurposed by AHF and the Healthy Housing Foundation in 2018 for use as housing for the homeless and extremely-low-income individuals.

“While I am extremely pleased that our City Council designated the King Edward Hotel an official Historic-Cultural Monument—a well-deserved recognition for this beautiful 1906 Beaux Arts hotel located in the heart of Skid Row—I believe what really makes this property historic is its new life repurposed as housing for formerly homeless and extremely-low-income individuals,” said Hon. Kevin de Léon, Los Angeles City Council Member for District 14. “I’ve always said our approach to reducing homelessness must be all hands on deck, so AHF and the Healthy Housing Foundation are to be commended for their innovative and cost-effective approach to address our growing homeless situation via the adaptive reuse of many old hotels and motels like the King Edward, an approach I believe the city and other organizations should get behind.”

The historic designation came via City Council’s adoption of a motion passed on consent calendar at Wednesday’s council meeting (Agenda Item #29—Council File item #20-0736).

According to documents submitted in support of the designation, the Cultural Heritage Commission, in a June 11, 2020 letter and memo to the city’s Planning and Land Use Management Committee (PLUM), recommended that PLUM urge the City Council consider the King Edward Hotel for inclusion in the list of Historic-Cultural Monuments. The Heritage Commission had previously voted unanimously (on May 5, 2020) to recommend Historic-Cultural Monument status. The Cultural Heritage Commission noted:

“The King Edward Hotel meets two of the Historic-Cultural Monument criteria: it “exemplifies significant contributions to the broad cultural, economic or social history of the nation, state, city or community” for its association with the early 20th century development of hotels in Downtown Los Angeles, and as the home of the King Eddy Saloon, a business important to the commercial identity of Downtown Los Angeles that has continuously operated at the property since the 1930s; and it “embodies the distinctive characteristics of a style, type, period, or method of

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AHF: Skid Row’s King Edward Hotel Earns City’s Historic Designation – Press Release

LOS ANGELES–(Business Wire)–The Los Angeles City Council has designated the King Edward Hotel, a 1906-era Beaux Arts hotel, and its King Eddy Saloon, a bar and former speakeasy in continuous operation since the 1930s, status as the newest Los Angeles Historic-Cultural Monument.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20201127005607/en/

The 1906-era King Edward Hotel on L.A.'s Skid Row was repurposed by AHF and its Healthy Housing Foundation for use as housing for the homeless and extremely-low-income individuals. (Graphic: Business Wire)

The 1906-era King Edward Hotel on L.A.’s Skid Row was repurposed by AHF and its Healthy Housing Foundation for use as housing for the homeless and extremely-low-income individuals. (Graphic: Business Wire)

The 150-room hotel, located on the edge of L.A.’s Skid Row, was purchased, refurbished and repurposed by AHF and the Healthy Housing Foundation in 2018 for use as housing for the homeless and extremely-low-income individuals.

“While I am extremely pleased that our City Council designated the King Edward Hotel an official Historic-Cultural Monument—a well-deserved recognition for this beautiful 1906 Beaux Arts hotel located in the heart of Skid Row—I believe what really makes this property historic is its new life repurposed as housing for formerly homeless and extremely-low-income individuals,” said Hon. Kevin de Léon, Los Angeles City Council Member for District 14. “I’ve always said our approach to reducing homelessness must be all hands on deck, so AHF and the Healthy Housing Foundation are to be commended for their innovative and cost-effective approach to address our growing homeless situation via the adaptive reuse of many old hotels and motels like the King Edward, an approach I believe the city and other organizations should get behind.”

The historic designation came via City Council’s adoption of a motion passed on consent calendar at Wednesday’s council meeting (Agenda Item #29—Council File item #20-0736).

According to documents submitted in support of the designation, the Cultural Heritage Commission, in a June 11, 2020 letter and memo to the city’s Planning and Land Use Management Committee (PLUM), recommended that PLUM urge the City Council consider the King Edward Hotel for inclusion in the list of Historic-Cultural Monuments. The Heritage Commission had previously voted unanimously (on May 5, 2020) to recommend Historic-Cultural Monument status. The Cultural Heritage Commission noted:

“The King Edward Hotel meets two of the Historic-Cultural Monument criteria: it “exemplifies significant contributions to the broad cultural, economic or social history of the nation, state, city or community” for its association with the early 20th century development of hotels in Downtown Los Angeles, and as the home of the King Eddy Saloon, a business important to the commercial identity of Downtown Los Angeles that has continuously operated at the property since the 1930s; and it “embodies the distinctive characteristics of a style, type, period, or method of construction” and “represents a notable work of a master designer, builder, or architect whose individual genius influenced his or her age” as an excellent example of a commercial building in the Beaux Arts architectural style, and a significant work of master architect John Parkinson.”

“I’m thrilled that the city has recognized John Parkinson’s King Edward Hotel as a protected cultural landmark. The hotel is

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AC Hotel Park City Opens as the City’s Newest Lifestyle Hotel

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.


PARK CITY, Utah, Nov. 26, 2020 /PRNewswire via COMTEX/ —
PARK CITY, Utah, Nov. 26, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — AC Hotel Park City, owned by Ensign Hospitality, opens its doors on Dec. 7, 2020, inviting travelers to experience a hotel with style and intention in Utah’s cultured city. Part of AC Hotels by Marriott®, the design-driven hotel brand from Marriott International, this newly constructed hotel combines a small-town lodge feel with elegant, comfortable rooms and sleek, modern amenities, bringing purposeful design to Park City.

“We are excited to introduce AC Hotel Park City to our community near and far,” said Kirk Barker of Ensign Hospitality. “Park City is a year-round recreational haven, cultural hub, and distinctive venue for business, making it a perfect location for the well-intentioned AC Hotels guest.

AC Hotel Park City takes form with clean modern lines, aesthetically proportioned spaces, and balanced use of premium materials distinctive to the AC Hotels brand. The intuitive design was created to capture the majestic and wondrous spirit of the hotel’s surroundings and appeal to modern lifestyles. Embracing AC Hotels’ focus on harmonious design and tailored style, the hotel features minimalist guest rooms that allow travelers to use the space in whatever way they see fit. Free of traditional hotel room distractions, the 100 guest rooms are designed to maximize a sense of openness with plenty of open surfaces to place luggage or pull up a chair and work.

The AC Lobby features inviting furnishings, locally sourced art, and timeless, contemporary touches that evoke the feeling of a well-curated gallery. The AC Kitchen offers the brand’s signature European-inspired breakfast with options ranging from butter croissants imported from France, artisan cured meats such as thinly sliced Italian Prosciutto from AC’s iconic Berkel slicing machine, an international selection of cheeses, as well as yogurts and cereals, seasonal fruits, and local specialties. During the day, the AC Lounge® serves as a place to relax or create with maximum comfort and function in mind. In the evening, the AC Bar serves up a variety of signature cocktails, craft beers, and local wines paired with a Spanish-inspired tapas menu. The hotel also includes a state-of-the-art fitness center and indoor swimming pool with whirlpool.

Members of Marriott Bonvoy, Marriott International’s global travel program, have many of the hotel’s services at their fingertips with the Marriott Bonvoy App, including a digital room key, seamless check-in and check-out, as well as complimentary Wi-Fi.

Located just 35 minutes from the Salt Lake City International Airport, AC Hotel Park City is in close proximity to Park City’s wealth of activities, including a vibrant shopping district, exquisite dining options, and leisure options for all, including local breweries, Olympic Park and, most notably, the host of the International Sundance Film Festival in the winter.

To learn more about AC Hotel Park City, please visit www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/slcac-ac-hotel-park-city. 

Logos, product, and company names mentioned are the property of their respective owners.

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Upgrades and renovations spruce up Bay City’s DoubleTree by Hilton hotel

BAY CITY, MI — Guests who stay at DoubleTree by Hilton Bay City – Riverfront can now check-in and enter their room with a digital “key” without ever having to stop by the front desk.

DoubleTree by Hilton Bay City – Riverfront recently underwent a hotel and conference center renovation, which included new decor, bathroom renovations, addition of a “Made Market” and open lobby concept, and the addition of Hilton’s Digital Key system.

DoubleTree officials gave MLive/The Bay City Times a tour of the 150-room hotel on Tuesday, Nov. 10.

Upgrades throughout the downtown Bay City hotel, located at 1 Wenonah Park Place, include new lighting, wall coverings, carpeting, bedding, newly-installed showers and bathtubs, and new bathroom accessories. And guest room doors are now equipped to accept Hilton’s Digital Key so guests can unlock guest rooms using their smartphone, according to a DoubleTree by Hilton news release.

Sales and Marketing Manager Becky Hortop said the Hilton Digital Key was already being implemented prior to COVID-19. It gives guests the option to use their smartphone or iPad to open any door that would regularly be opened with a key card. By using the Hilton Honors application, guests can check-in before they arrive without having to visit the front desk. They’ll receive a push notification when their room is ready and their digital key is activated.

“We are excited to have our guests experience the new upgrades and renovation,” Jamie Ralph, director of sales at DoubleTree by Hilton Bay City – Riverfront, said in a statement. “In addition to our cleaning procedures, we have implemented Hilton’s EventReady with CleanStay programs to welcome our guests when they are ready.”

Jamie Ralph, director of sales, said the hotel will offer specials now through the end of January.

“There is no denying that COVID-19 has hurt our hotel, but larger than that it has destroyed guests’ confidence in travel,” she said. “We are hoping the lower room rates help people connect with their loved ones without having to have everyone under the same roof.”

The hotel will also offer affordable catering options for holiday parties and celebrations, she said.

Hotel amenities include free WiFi, non-smoking rooms, on-site restaurant, free parking, indoor pool, fitness center, business center, room service and meeting rooms.

For more information or to make a reservation, call 989-891-6000 or visit baycityriverfront.doubltree.com.

Read more on MLive:

Madonna mural quickly pops up in downtown Bay City

See 18 blighted structures Bay City is tearing down to boost surrounding neighborhoods

New economic recovery plan for Bay County aims to make the community stronger

Bay City Commission approves plan to make Midland Street entertainment district safer

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New San Antonio luxury hotel to open in January; it’s the city’s first in more than five years

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Hotel Thompson San Antonio — the first new luxury hotel in the city in more than five years — is scheduled to open downtown on Jan. 27.

The 20-story hotel on the River Walk, near the Tobin Center for the Performing Arts, will feature 162 rooms and 33 suites, and charge some of the highest room rates in San Antonio.

The city’s hospitality industry likely will still be struggling when Hotel Thompson open its doors. Many business travelers are staying home, and San Antonio’s convention business is nearly at a standstill.

One of 162 guest rooms. Interior designs include wood and rustic metal accents unique to the San Antonio property. Early preview of the Thompson San Antonio hotel, a Hyatt property, in the heart of downtown San Antonio on Thursday, Nov. 5, 2020.

Nevertheless, visitors are trickling back, though mostly on the weekends.

Hotel Thompson originally was scheduled to open in late October or early this month, but its owners decided early next year would be a better time to launch.

“We decided to push it back a little obviously because of the pandemic,” said Ted Knighton, the hotel’s general manager. “But we’re ready to introduce it now.”

On ExpressNews.com: Wary Traveler: Delta markets COVID safety

Knighton said a standard room will go for $300 a night during the week and $400 on the weekends. Rates jump to $2,500 a night for the hotel’s 2,100-sq.-ft. penthouse suite, with two bedrooms, a dining area, a living room with a pool table and a private terrace.

Exterior view of the Thompson Hotel as seen from the Tobin Center. Early preview of the Thompson San Antonio hotel, a Hyatt property, in the heart of downtown San Antonio on Thursday, Nov. 5, 2020.

Among San Antonio hotels in the downtown area, only Hotel Emma at the Pearl generally charges higher rates. The hotel’s website lists a standard room for $475 a night on Wednesday, Jan. 27, the day Hotel Thompson is scheduled to open.

Hotel Emma opened in November 2015.

The Thompson chain, part of the Hyatt Corp., is aiming for excitement, with “celebrity chefs” — Knighton said the hotel will identify them at a later date — anchoring its restaurants, art exhibits and disk jockeys playing music poolside.

The cavernous meeting room. Early preview of the Thompson San Antonio hotel, a Hyatt property, in the heart of downtown San Antonio on Thursday, Nov. 5, 2020.

“There really is not a hotel in San Antonio that will have the nightlife scene like we will have,” Knighton said.

The $130 million building housing the hotel also includes 59 condominiums, called the Arts Residences at Thompson San Antonio.

On ExpressNews.com: Wary Traveler: Southwest Airlines to take on United, American in Houston, Chicago and Miami

Residents of the condos, which priced from the low $500,000s to more than $4 million, will share the pool deck and workout room with hotel guests. They’ll also have access to hotel services, such as 24-hour room service.

Condo owners started moving in last week. Fifty-two of the 59 units are sold.

The Hotel Thompson provides a view of the San Antonio skyline.

Amid the COVID-19 downturn, which has forced most hotels to cut workers, Knighton said one factor in Hotel Thompson’s favor is the limited number of luxury properties in San Antonio.

“San Antonio is different,” the general manager said. “It doesn’t have a surplus of luxury products.”

He said guests in the luxury market are traveling sooner than expected. The hotel,

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Opening of Navy Pier hotel is postponed, the latest blow to city’s reeling hotel market

Before Navy Pier temporarily shut down on Labor Day, officials of the popular lakefront attraction remained optimistic about the planned opening of The Sable Hotel, built atop an existing pier building. So did the hotel’s developer.

“As of today our goal is to open the hotel on time Nov. 1,” the developer, Robert Habeeb, CEO of Maverick Hotels, Restaurants, told the Tribune at the time.

Now, in the latest blow to the Chicago area’s reeling hotel market, the opening of the 223-room hotel has been put off until March “because of the relentless nature of COVID and the market is in the doldrums,” Habeeb said Monday.

Asked if a March 1 hotel opening was unrealistic, given the current COVID surge, Habeeb said: “We’re hoping that, by then, there’s going to be medicine and vaccines. We have to open. We can’t stay closed forever.”

The hotel’s website, which said Monday that bookings are available for April 1 and beyond, will be changed to reflect the new opening date, he said.

Hotel occupancy in the Chicago metro area was 36.6% for the week ending Oct. 17, according to hotel industry market research firm STR. Last year, the figure was 84% for the week of Oct. 13-19.

In August, when officials announced the temporary closing of the pier, whose Ferris wheel and lakefront promenade have made it one of the Chicago’s top tourist attractions, they aimed to limit losses due to a lack of attendance. The pier, a not-for-profit entity, already was anticipating revenues falling $20 million short of projections.

It’s possible the closure, which originally was to last until April, could be extended, depending on the status of the pandemic.

“We’ve been targeting April [for reopening], but obviously we’ll keep an eye on what’s happening with the pandemic and, particularly, government restrictions,” Marilyn Kelly Gardner, president and CEO of Navy Pier, said Monday.

The pier could reopen in phases, she said.

The postponement of the hotel’s opening mark the latest setback for the city’s hospitality industry.

In August, the owner of the historic Palmer House Hilton, New York-based Thor Equities, was sued for almost $338 million in missed loan payments, in the largest Chicago foreclosure case to emerge from the pandemic.

At Willis Tower, the Skydeck observation area on the 103rd floor is open just three days a week instead of the usual seven.

The Sable operates under the Curio Collection by Hilton umbrella.

Designed by Chicago’s Koo architects, the hotel has been built atop an existing structure near the pier’s east end. Its name honors a World War II training ship, an aircraft carrier, that docked at Navy Pier.

Blair Kamin is a Tribune critic.

[email protected]

Twitter @BlairKamin

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Hot Hotel: University Arms Cambridge is a nod to the city’s quintessential Britishness | Short & City breaks | Travel

University Arms Cambridge

Despite its grandeur, the hotel is reassuringly relaxing (Image: PR)

This being Cambridge, one of the UK’s most prestigious seats of learning, interior designer Martin Brudnizki (whose projects include The Ivy restaurant, Buckingham Palace), working alongside Classical architect, John Simpson, has introduced scholarly elements.

Photographs of crews of the legendary Cambridge teams; of Winston Churchill resplendent in a favourite siren suit; another, an extraordinary alfresco lunch for 32,000 on Parker’s Piece celebrating the coronation of Queen Victoria and various botanical prints and old maps are a nod to quintessential Cambridge and its Britishness. 

Some of the original features of the building remain: a massive fireplace in the library, where distressed leather sofas sit on reclaimed parquet floors and original stained glass windows, featuring college crests overlook Parker’s piece.

Despite its grandeur, the hotel is reassuringly relaxing and its 192 rooms and nine suites ooze luxury.

Mine, the Charles Darwin suite, featured a nod to the great naturalist with well-chosen books relating to natural history such as dinosaurs and woodlands. 

Lighting emanates from wrought-iron chandeliers powder-sprayed in pillar-box red with dinky shades and industrial-style lamps.

Bedside lighting is mismatched, as are the bedside tables, avoiding looking too contrived. The hypnos beds are superb, as is the silky linen.  

Black marble bathroom basins work beautifully against white tiles and come with superb rain showers, claw-footed baths and smellies courtesy of D. R. Harris & Co. 

Corridors of carpet in deep blue and rust stripes representing the Cambridge University Tie connect the rabbit-warren array of hallways and the hotel’s recurring colour, uplifting Cambridge (Tiffany) Blue, pops up in trays and Dutch bikes available for guests. 

Cambridge

The property’s 192 rooms and nine suites ooze luxury (Image: PR)

COVID CHECK IN

Apart from a couple of staff wearing visors, hand sanitiser and a sign detailing what measures the hotel has taken, Reception appeared to be relatively ‘normal’.

I loved the very ‘Royal Birth Announcement’ ornate easel featuring details of the Covid app as well as decals of characters from Wind in the Willows on the floor tiles reminding guests to be considerate of others. Many amenities were removed from the room, such as bathrobes and body lotion. These are however, available on request. 

Drinks and food is left on a tray outside your door and rooms are serviced after three days and are thoroughly cleaned and left to sit for 24 hours after guest’s departure.  

STYLE

Parker’s Tavern has a very relaxed French bistro feel with white linen tablecloths, banquettes and Wainscot walls adorned with Cambridge-themed scenes (more rowing and old photographs of the city) under gigantic circular ‘chandeliers’ of wrought iron. 

Each second table was left empty to encourage social distancing but this didn’t detract in any way from the appealing atmosphere.

If nothing else, Parker’s is a destination restaurant with an incredible menu created by Tristan Welch who was Gordon Ramsey’s partner at Petrus. 

Kick off the evening in the adjoining bar (bar stools have been removed) with a cocktail or glass of

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