Tag: City

WoodSpring Suites proposes new Milwaukee development. The hotel chain’s 2018 plans were rejected by city officials.

An extended-stay hotel chain that has been repeatedly rebuffed in attempts to open its first Wisconsin location is trying again — this time on Milwaukee’s far northwest side.



a car parked in front of a building: A WoodSpring Suites extended-stay hotel is being proposed for the southeast corner of West Bradley Road and North 124th Street.


© WoodSpring Suites
A WoodSpring Suites extended-stay hotel is being proposed for the southeast corner of West Bradley Road and North 124th Street.

A four-story, 122-room WoodSpring Suites is being proposed for the southeast corner of West Bradley Road and North 124th Street. 

That proposal will need Common Council approval — both to rezone the site and to grant a hotel license.

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And it comes over two years after the council rejected a license application for a WoodSpring at 1701 W. Layton Ave., on Milwaukee’s far south side.

That license was rejected in 2018 after then-Ald. Terry Witkowski, whose district included the development site, and nearby homeowners objected.

Witkowski, at a 2017 Plan Commission meeting, said WoodSpring “does not have a great reputation” and has been turned away in other Milwaukee-area communities.

The hotel chain’s niche of offering bargain-priced rooms for guests who stay several days has raised concerns in Milwaukee and other communities.

WoodSpring in 2015 proposed a similar hotel at 4040 W. Layton Ave., Greenfield.

Those plans were opposed by Greenfield officials, who said it would generate a high number of police calls. 

WoodSpring executives disputed that claim, saying their hotels have safe main entrances, security cameras and proper exterior lighting. 

The WoodSpring being proposed on Milwaukee’s far northwest side would be developed by Wichita, Kansas-based New Era Development Group LLC.

New Era’s projects include eight WoodSpring Suites locations in the Columbus, Ohio; San Antonio, Texas; Fort Worth, Texas; and Wichita areas.

Those hotels have received praise from local officials for their safety and security, said Chris Stevens, New Era managing member.

Stevens said New Era operates its hotels with 24-hour staffing, unlike how some WoodSpring locations have been managed in the past.

He also said the WoodSpring chain, which is franchised by Rockville, Maryland-based Choice Hotels International Inc., continues to grow, and operates in metro areas throughout the country without major problems.

The northwest side Milwaukee proposal has the support of Ald. Nikiya Dodd, whose district includes the site, Stevens said.

New Era would likely begin construction by late spring of 2021 if the $10 million project wins city approval, Stevens said.

It would open by late spring or early summer of 2022, he said.

Stevens said the 3-acre site has strong visibility, as well as quick access to nearby I-41.

Tom Daykin can be emailed at [email protected] and followed on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. 

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This article originally appeared on Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: WoodSpring Suites proposes new Milwaukee development. The hotel chain’s 2018 plans were rejected by city officials.

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Cathedral City voters to decide fate of short-term vacation rentals in March special election

The Cathedral City Council on Wednesday night unanimously agreed to allow voters to decide whether to phase out short-term vacation rentals, teeing up a heated debate before a special election occurs on March 2.



a truck that has a sign on the side of a mountain: Cathedral City is the second most populous city in the Coachella Valley.


© Jay Calderon/The Desert Sun
Cathedral City is the second most populous city in the Coachella Valley.

Faced with the decision of repealing a previously passed ordinance to phase-out rentals or calling for a referendum, the council went with the latter, citing the quality of life issues raised by many residents and strong opinions on either side.

“We’re divided here,” Councilmember Mark Carnavale said. “This has to go to the voters for their opinion.”

A working-class community with around 54,000 residents, Cathedral City had around 400 short-term vacation rentals this year before the council passed an ordinance to eliminate them in all neighborhoods but homeowners associations. Their presence has caused significant debate including a lengthy task force report, a moratorium on new rentals, and hundreds of comments from residents on either side of the debate. 

Through the referendum, voters will decide whether the city should stick with the council’s September decision to undo its existing regulations and phase out short-term rentals by 2023, or overturn those policies. 

After the September vote, supporters of short-term rentals organized as Share Cathedral City embarked on a signature-gathering campaign to overturn the ban. The group is an offshoot of another group called I Love Cathedral City that sprung up earlier this year to support vacation rentals, and both argued that Cathedral City didn’t properly enforce its original short-term rental ordinance before making the decision to ban them.

They gathered 4,304 signatures, and 3,515 were verified by the county registrar of voters as of November 24. That meets the threshold of more than 10% of the city’s registered voters to trigger a referendum on whether to overturn the ordinance.



a sign on a dirt road: A sign with a slogan in favor of banning short term rentals sits in the front yard of a home in Cathedral City, Calif. on Tuesday, October 27, 2020.


© Vickie Connor/The Desert Sun
A sign with a slogan in favor of banning short term rentals sits in the front yard of a home in Cathedral City, Calif. on Tuesday, October 27, 2020.

Past coverage: Cathedral City votes to phase out short-term rentals by 2023

Past coverage: Cathedral City group opposed to short-term rental ban submits petition

Because the group gathered enough signatures, the council could’ve voted to repeal the ordinance or put it to the voters. In casting his vote in support of the referendum, Mayor John Aguilar said he has concluded that short-term vacations are “disruptive to our neighborhoods and a bad idea.”

Before Wednesday’s vote, roughly 40 people spoke during a two-hour-long public hearing on what has become one of the most controversial issues for Cathedral City in recent memory.

Residents on both sides of the debate urged the council to take their side by citing the cost to taxpayers of hosting a special election. The Riverside County Registrar of Voters estimates it will cost be between $75,000 and $85,000, according to Cathedral City documents. 

A heated debate

When the city decided to phase out short-term rentals by

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City Suspends Indoor Recreation Due To Rise In Covid-19 Cases

Oakland’s Town Camp Enrichment Program is being suspended because of the COVID-19 pandemic, city officials announced Thursday.

The program provides indoor recreation to school-age youth from kindergarten through fifth grade. Outdoor youth programs, senior programs, library services and homeless services will still be provided, according to city officials.

According to Alameda County, 10,884 cases of the coronavirus have been reported in Oakland as of Thursday. City officials said the recent spike in virus cases and possibly a further increase because of family holiday gatherings were behind the decision to suspend the enrichment program.

“We realize that this will be a burden on some families,” city officials said. “However, we feel it is gravely necessary for us to play our part to control the spread of COVID-19, for both the customers we serve AND our own staff and their families.”

In-person enrichment programs were provided during the summer and at recreation centers since the beginning of the school year.


“We will continue following Alameda County Public Health guidelines and protocols over the next few weeks and will communicate when we feel we can safely resume indoor programming,” city officials said.

Head Start in Oakland remains open for in-person as well as virtual services but will have an extended winter break in anticipation of the increase in coronavirus cases.

Head Start locations will be closed from Dec. 21 through Jan. 8 and open again on Jan. 11. Families will be served virtually during the winter break.

Senior centers are not open for in-person services but are delivering food and making it available for pickup as well as providing virtual classes and information and referral services. More information can be found at https://www.oaklandca.gov/topics/senior-services.

Housing services for homeless residents remain in operation. Anyone interested in providing food or supplies to help homeless residents is encouraged to work with a provider of those services to reduce the risk of exposing homeless residents to the coronavirus.

Sidewalk library services continue to be provided at 16 locations during limited hours while indoor areas will stay closed to the public.

Library materials can be returned at outdoor bookdrops. The materials are quarantined for 96 hours before they are checked in.

Oakland Public Library reference librarians can be reached by calling (510) 238-3134 or by email at [email protected]

Copyright © 2020 by Bay City News, Inc. Republication, Rebroadcast or any other Reuse without the express written consent of Bay City News, Inc. is prohibited.

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City of Winnipeg proposes $600K for COVID-19 wellness fund, recreation spending boost



a man riding a snowboard down a snow covered bridge: The city has proposed a $600,000 fund for projects focused on mental health and allowing residents to get out safely during the pandemic. Eligible projects could include things like skating trails or snow sculpture contests, the city says.


© Darren Bernhardt/CBC
The city has proposed a $600,000 fund for projects focused on mental health and allowing residents to get out safely during the pandemic. Eligible projects could include things like skating trails or snow sculpture contests, the city says.

The City of Winnipeg has proposed a $600,000 fund in its preliminary 2021 budget to support citizens’ physical, mental and emotional health during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Winnipeg Wellness Fund would give each city councillor’s ward $40,000 to spend on community-led initiatives focused on mental health and allowing residents to get out safely during the winter.

“We can all use little bit more happy in our day and the Winnipeg Wellness Fund is a great way to support community wellness projects that give us some happiness this winter,” Coun. John Orlikow (River Heights-Fort Garry) said in a news release.

“There are many creative people in Winnipeg and this fund supports their brilliant ideas that put a smile on neighbours faces during this winter.”

The fund would be available to businesses, schools, community centres, non-profits and various other organizations and associations, the release says.

To be eligible for funding, the initiatives have to comply with Manitoba public health orders. The city says eligible projects could include skating trails, snow or ice sculpture contests, additional lighting for street or walking path lighting, school decorations, or funding to support good deeds for seniors.

Money will be given out on a first-come, first-served basis, the city says. An online application will be made available, with an application deadline of Feb. 28, 2021. Any funding granted will have to be used by April 30, 2021.

Funding will be reviewed and approved by each ward’s city councillor.

Library, rec facility funding increase

The city also committed to increased spending for local libraries and recreational facilities in its preliminary 2021 budget, and designated $50 million of provincial funding over the next three years for improving some of those facilities.

That’s a shift from a year ago, when the multi-year budget process initially included recommendations to shut down some facilities, including several local libraries — though public outcry swayed council to keep them open.



a group of people in a library: The multi-year balanced budget process last year originally included suggestions to shut down some facilities, including some local libraries.


© Daniel Gagne/CBC
The multi-year balanced budget process last year originally included suggestions to shut down some facilities, including some local libraries.

“Recreation facilities and libraries are essential amenities that support Winnipeg families,” said Coun. Sherri Rollins (Fort Rouge-East Fort Garry), who chairs the city’s protection, community services and parks committee, in a news release.

“These investments support inclusion, access, recreation, and cultural destinations like our libraries. Listening to Winnipeggers, we know their overarching budget priorities are for investment in recreational and library facilities.”

To maintain core services and programming, the annual operating budget of the community services department will increase from $106.9 million in 2020 to $112 million in 2023.

The city will receive a total of $225 million in provincial capital funding over the next three years. Of that, $50 million will be spent on the city’s recreation and library investment

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Inside the famously discreet New York City hotel known as the ‘Palace of Secrets’ where Princess Diana stayed when she visited the city



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City employee at Minto Recreation Complex tests positive for COVID-19

OTTAWA —
The City of Ottawa says an employee at the Minto Recreation Complex in Barrhaven has tested positive for COVID-19 and two additional employees are self-isolating.

In a memo sent Monday afternoon, General Manager of Recreation, Cultural and Facility Services Dan Chenier said the employee’s positive test result was confirmed on Saturday.

“The employee was last at work at Minto Recreation Complex-Barrhaven on November 24 and was asymptomatic at the time. On November 25, the employee did not attend work and presented for testing upon receiving news that a close contact had tested positive, as well as having developed symptoms. A positive test was confirmed on November 28 and the individual continues to self-isolate at home,” Chenier said.

Chenier noted that two employees at the complex were deemed to be close contacts of the employee who had tested positive and they are also self-isolating.

“We are working directly with Ottawa Public Health (OPH) and are conducting contact tracing of individuals who have, or may have been, in close contact with the employee,” Chenier said.

Chenier did not say that any services at the complex would be affected.

“If customers have concerns of exposure, they can contact Ottawa Public Health at 613-580-6744 to speak to a public health nurse or visit ottawapublichealth.ca,” Chenier said. 

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Man found dead hanging from rope on Atlantic City hotel balcony

A 59-year-old man was found dead Monday hanging from a rope tied to an upper floor balcony of an Atlantic City hotel, city police said.

Investigators said the man was from Plainsboro, Middlesex County, but provided no additional information on his identity. He was found shortly before 5:30 a.m. at the 32-floor Club Wyndham Skyline Tower after a 911 call from a passerby.

Officers were escorted to a hotel room and discovered a rope tied around the balcony railing. The city fire department helped pull the body back to the balcony, police said.

City police Lieutenant Kevin Fair said Monday there was “no belief of criminal activity” related to the incident. He said an investigation is continuing into a cause of death.

Anyone with information about this incident is urged to contact the Atlantic City Police Department Criminal Investigations Section at 609-347-5766 or text anonymously to tip411 (847411). Begin the text with ACPD.

The hotel is located a block from the Atlantic City Boardwalk and features balconies with ocean and city views, according to a brochure.

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Bill Duhart may be reached at [email protected].

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Sterling Heights hotel in dispute with city alleges anti-Muslim, anti-refugee bias

The owner of a Sterling Heights hotel who is Muslim and of Pakistani descent alleges in a lawsuit filed Monday that city officials targeted and drove him out of business because of his faith and ethnicity and because he had housed about 200 Syrian refugees.



a large empty room: The owner of Wyndham Garden hotel in Sterling Heights near 15 Mile and Van Dyke has filed a lawsuit alleging anti-Muslim, anti-Pakistani bias.


© Shereef Akeel
The owner of Wyndham Garden hotel in Sterling Heights near 15 Mile and Van Dyke has filed a lawsuit alleging anti-Muslim, anti-Pakistani bias.

But on the same day, a Macomb County judge ruled against the hotel in a separate lawsuit that had been filed by city, agreeing with the city that the hotel had failed to meet safety regulations.

Asad Malik, the owner of Wyndham Garden on 15 Mile and Van Dyke and president of the Pakistani Association of America, says in a lawsuit filed Monday in federal court in Detroit that after he started housing Syrian refugees in 2016, the city started to slap him with citations for violations of fire codes that he said other hotels with similar problems were not receiving. The hotel closed in September. 

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Malik purchased the hotel in 2014. He is an active member of the Muslim community in metro Detroit as a leader with the Islamic Association of Greater Detroit in Rochester Hills and meets with elected officials who have visited the mosque over the years. 

The hotel was “opening her arms to refugees escaping from their war torn country,” his attorney Shereef Akeel, who filed the lawsuit on behalf of Sterling Hotels, told the Free Press. “The last thing you would think is then one of our own cites shutting the door on them. And now, my client has had to pay dearly for their act of generosity.”

The hotel started taking in Syrian refugees in November 2016, working with Samaritas, formerly known as Lutheran Social Services of Michigan, which helps resettle refugees.

Malik said he then received an email from the Sterling Heights city manager asking him: “Are there any Syrian refugees being housed at the Wyndham? A resident is alleging such at our council meeting.”

The targeted harassment started after that, with the fire marshal being directed by the city to single out the hotel for code violations such as outdated fire alarm systems, the lawsuit alleges. Other hotels owned by people who were not Muslim were not targeted in such a manner, Akeel said.

But the city of Sterling Heights strongly denies the allegations, saying the problem lies with the hotel refusing to adhere to fire codes and city regulations to ensure safety.

The city had filed a lawsuit against the hotel in 2018, alleging it had violated fire regulations that was jeopardizing safety. The city said the hotel had “high risk violations” throughout 2017. 

More: Detroit Archbishop to lead national Catholic group on Joe Biden and abortion

In June 2018, the judge issued a preliminary injunction banning overnight guests at the hotel. The hotel

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City of Edmonton clamping down on mask mandate in recreation facilities, closing 22 arenas to curb spread of COVID-19

The City of Edmonton is clamping down on enforcement of the mandatory mask bylaw and will require masks in all city recreation facilities even if an individual is exempt.



a person holding a sign: A patron enters the Kinsmen Sports Centre, in Edmonton Monday Aug. 10, 2020. Starting Dec. 1, even individuals who are exempt from wearing face coverings will need to don one in the city's recreation centres.


© Provided by Edmonton Journal
A patron enters the Kinsmen Sports Centre, in Edmonton Monday Aug. 10, 2020. Starting Dec. 1, even individuals who are exempt from wearing face coverings will need to don one in the city’s recreation centres.

On Friday, interim city manager Adam Laughlin announced the change, which will take effect Dec. 1 in an effort to curb the spread of COVID-19 as cases spike in the Edmonton region. The city has previously advised businesses to make accommodations for those exempt from wearing a face covering by allowing them in or providing curb-side pickup.

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But Laughlin said further restrictions are required with the growing number of cases. Masks can be removed when exercising or swimming inside the facilities but must be worn at all other times.

There are currently 6,614 active cases of COVID-19 in the Edmonton Zone.

“We’ve reached the tipping point where the rate of the spread of the virus could grow and cause even more devastating to our health and safety of our residents and our economy,” he said. “The priority right now is shutting down the spread of transmission and protecting our health system.”

The city’s five recreation facilities will remain open for individual exercise and swimming, but Laughlin said 22 arenas will be closing between Dec. 1-18. These arenas weren’t open to the public, but available for bookings by leagues or community organizations. Only the Downtown Community Arena will remain open as part of the World Junior Hockey Championships to be hosted at Rogers Place.

Three city-run senior centres and the St. Francis Xavier Sports Centre will also close and all indoor events and group activities at city facilities will be cancelled, Laughlin said.

Two popular holiday attractions will also look a little different this year. Zoominescence at the Edmonton Valley Zoo will continue but all guests must wear a mask and book timed-entry tickets in advance. Crestwood’s popular Candy Cane Lane will be drive-through only, with sleigh rides and food trucks cancelled this year.

Laughlin cautioned Edmontonians that if there isn’t a reduction in virus transmission by Dec. 15 an expansion or enhancement of restrictions may be required through the holidays. This could include the city taking its own action by ordering the closure of restaurants or businesses.

He also asked residents to avoid non-essential travel as much as possible and shop locally within their neighbourhoods.

Council’s emergency advisory committee is next scheduled to meet on Dec. 10.

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AC Hotel Park City Opens as the City’s Newest Lifestyle Hotel

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.


PARK CITY, Utah, Nov. 26, 2020 /PRNewswire via COMTEX/ —
PARK CITY, Utah, Nov. 26, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — AC Hotel Park City, owned by Ensign Hospitality, opens its doors on Dec. 7, 2020, inviting travelers to experience a hotel with style and intention in Utah’s cultured city. Part of AC Hotels by Marriott®, the design-driven hotel brand from Marriott International, this newly constructed hotel combines a small-town lodge feel with elegant, comfortable rooms and sleek, modern amenities, bringing purposeful design to Park City.

“We are excited to introduce AC Hotel Park City to our community near and far,” said Kirk Barker of Ensign Hospitality. “Park City is a year-round recreational haven, cultural hub, and distinctive venue for business, making it a perfect location for the well-intentioned AC Hotels guest.

AC Hotel Park City takes form with clean modern lines, aesthetically proportioned spaces, and balanced use of premium materials distinctive to the AC Hotels brand. The intuitive design was created to capture the majestic and wondrous spirit of the hotel’s surroundings and appeal to modern lifestyles. Embracing AC Hotels’ focus on harmonious design and tailored style, the hotel features minimalist guest rooms that allow travelers to use the space in whatever way they see fit. Free of traditional hotel room distractions, the 100 guest rooms are designed to maximize a sense of openness with plenty of open surfaces to place luggage or pull up a chair and work.

The AC Lobby features inviting furnishings, locally sourced art, and timeless, contemporary touches that evoke the feeling of a well-curated gallery. The AC Kitchen offers the brand’s signature European-inspired breakfast with options ranging from butter croissants imported from France, artisan cured meats such as thinly sliced Italian Prosciutto from AC’s iconic Berkel slicing machine, an international selection of cheeses, as well as yogurts and cereals, seasonal fruits, and local specialties. During the day, the AC Lounge® serves as a place to relax or create with maximum comfort and function in mind. In the evening, the AC Bar serves up a variety of signature cocktails, craft beers, and local wines paired with a Spanish-inspired tapas menu. The hotel also includes a state-of-the-art fitness center and indoor swimming pool with whirlpool.

Members of Marriott Bonvoy, Marriott International’s global travel program, have many of the hotel’s services at their fingertips with the Marriott Bonvoy App, including a digital room key, seamless check-in and check-out, as well as complimentary Wi-Fi.

Located just 35 minutes from the Salt Lake City International Airport, AC Hotel Park City is in close proximity to Park City’s wealth of activities, including a vibrant shopping district, exquisite dining options, and leisure options for all, including local breweries, Olympic Park and, most notably, the host of the International Sundance Film Festival in the winter.

To learn more about AC Hotel Park City, please visit www.marriott.com/hotels/travel/slcac-ac-hotel-park-city. 

Logos, product, and company names mentioned are the property of their respective owners.

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