Tag: Chelsea

‘Chelsea have quality but we travel in hope; we can leave happy’

“One touch, two. If there are three, something strange has happened.” It’s early evening in Seville, the sun is coming through a crack in the curtain, and as Fernando is discussing his craft, there is a calm, almost peaceful simplicity to the way he talks, which Sevilla supporters have come to see reflected in his play. On Tuesday the former Manchester City midfielder returns to England, but don’t expect to see him on the ball much at Stamford Bridge. That’s not what he’ll be there for.



a man with a football ball on a field: Photograph: Pressinphoto/Rex/Shutterstock


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Pressinphoto/Rex/Shutterstock

“It’s a very hard place to play and we’ll struggle: Chelsea have quality, talented players, but we travel in hope, knowing we can leave happy,” the 33-year-old Brazilian says. Recent history suggests he could be right. It took an extra-time winner for Bayern Munich to defeat Sevilla in the European Super Cup and they land in London as Europa League winners, having defeated Manchester United in the semi-finals and then Internazionale in the final. “I got messages from City fans congratulating me,” he grins. Unbeaten in the league, something is building and if there is a team that can resist, it is they. And if there is a player who can, it is he.



a man with a football ball on a field: Fernando has become a pivotal figure at Sevilla, where he says team morale is unlike anything he has seen before.


© Photograph: Pressinphoto/Rex/Shutterstock
Fernando has become a pivotal figure at Sevilla, where he says team morale is unlike anything he has seen before.

Related: Southampton’s Vestergaard snatches point after Chelsea’s defensive disaster

“Oh, I suffer,” he says smiling, but it doesn’t often look like it. Instead there’s a tranquillity about him. “A brilliant player, so good tactically,” according to his teammate Joan Jordan, “wonderful” in the words of Monchi, the sporting director, he stands at the base of the Sevilla midfield. From there, the man Porto teammates called the Octopus, legs everywhere, reaching everything, applies the lessons learned since arriving in Europe at 19. No one recovers more possession nor completes more passes, the ball won and moved on.

“I was better physically, I ran much more but didn’t run well, didn’t do the right thing. I think much better than I did,” he says. “With experience you play better because your head is better.”

There have been 237 games at Porto, 57 at Galatasaray and 102 at City, plus 44 at Sevilla, each an education. There may have been no teacher such as Pep Guardiola, a coach who makes you fall in love with football, Fernando says. Which may seem a strange thing to say about a manager who gave you five league starts in that final season, and left you heading for the exit. But listening to him, thinking about what he says – and listening and thinking are themes he returns to often – it makes sense. All of it does.

“He’s different,” Fernando says. “Guardiola works with such enthusiasm, studies everything. He’s always searching, trying to understand the game better. Every session is an opportunity. If you play a bad pass, he stops: ‘Why did you play that pass?’”

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Fernando: ‘Chelsea have quality but we travel in hope’ | Football

“One touch, two. If there are three, something strange has happened.” It’s early evening in Seville, the sun is coming through a crack in the curtain, and as Fernando is discussing his craft, there is a calm, almost peaceful simplicity to the way he talks, which Sevilla supporters have come to see reflected in his play. On Tuesday the former Manchester City midfielder returns to England, but don’t expect to see him on the ball much at Stamford Bridge. That’s not what he’ll be there for.

“It’s a very hard place to play and we’ll struggle: Chelsea have quality, talented players, but we travel in hope, knowing we can leave happy,” the 33-year-old Brazilian says. Recent history suggests he could be right. It took an extra-time winner for Bayern Munich to defeat Sevilla in the European Super Cup and they land in London as Europa League winners, having defeated Manchester United in the semi-finals and then Internazionale in the final. “I got messages from City fans congratulating me,” he grins. Unbeaten in the league, something is building and if there is a team that can resist, it is they. And if there is a player who can, it is he.

“Oh, I suffer,” he says smiling, but it doesn’t often look like it. Instead there’s a tranquillity about him. “A brilliant player, so good tactically,” according to his teammate Joan Jordan, “wonderful” in the words of Monchi, the sporting director, he stands at the base of the Sevilla midfield. From there, the man Porto teammates called the Octopus, legs everywhere, reaching everything, applies the lessons learned since arriving in Europe at 19. No one recovers more possession nor completes more passes, the ball won and moved on.

“I was better physically, I ran much more but didn’t run well, didn’t do the right thing. I think much better than I did,” he says. “With experience you play better because your head is better.”

There have been 237 games at Porto, 57 at Galatasaray and 102 at City, plus 44 at Sevilla, each an education. There may have been no teacher such as Pep Guardiola, a coach who makes you fall in love with football, Fernando says. Which may seem a strange thing to say about a manager who gave you five league starts in that final season, and left you heading for the exit. But listening to him, thinking about what he says – and listening and thinking are themes he returns to often – it makes sense. All of it does.

“He’s different,” Fernando says. “Guardiola works with such enthusiasm, studies everything. He’s always searching, trying to understand the game better. Every session is an opportunity. If you play a bad pass, he stops: ‘Why did you play that pass?’” There’s a pause and the Brazilian draws his thumb and forefinger together. “He looks at the tiny details, the smallest advantage. All that makes you improve. I loved him as a coach.

“It’s true that sometimes he puts

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Chelsea Hotel tenants feud over mold, extortion

For 145 years, the Chelsea Hotel has been a scene of artistic greatness — Arthur C. Clarke wrote “2001: A Space Odyssey” there — and tragedy, including the deaths of Nancy Spungen and “The Lost Weekend” writer Charles R. Jackson.

But never has the Chelsea seen a war like what’s now taking place.

On one side, residents of five rent-regulated apartments have filed lawsuits and complaints claiming, among other things, “river flowing on 10th fl east,” “stench of mold” and “vermin infestation.”

On the other, co-owner Ira Drukier — along with some tenants — argues that these people are only looking for big buyouts: a total of $42 million, he claims.

It’s gotten so nasty that one court document alleged that Drukier “spewed spittle” into a tenant’s face. “I’m a 75-year-old guy. I don’t go around attacking people,” Drukier told The Post.

Last month, married residents Philip Taaffe and Gretchen Carlson filed suit over claims including water damage, a wrecked ceiling and lack of heat. “I watched my home crumble,” Carlson, who has lived there since 1995, told The Post.

Ira Drukier
Co-owner Ira Drukier (inset) wants to retain “artistic tenants,” but is legally allowed to renovate only communal spaces like this hallway, not inhabited apartments.Stefano Giovannini

But Drukier’s lawyer, Jennifer Recine, said the two “have lived full time in Cornwall, Conn., since 2014 and do not want their apartment fixed; they [want] millions of dollars to ‘give back’ a rent-stabilized apartment they don’t live in.”

“It’s hard to answer about moving back,” Carlson said. “You cannot sheetrock over broken pipes [when] there is mold. These are not minor house repairs.”

Residents of four additional units have lodged similar litigation. ‘These tenants have been fabricating and embellishing issues in an attempt to extort money,” said co-owner Richard Born. “Comments made by them are suspect.”

Meanwhile, other renters are frustrated by complainers holding up the work. The beefs have prevented Drukier from getting a Certificate of No Harassment to continue renovations in occupied apartments. (He said that many tenants receive a 35 percent rent abatement because of construction.)

Zoe Pappas, head of the tenants association, told The Post that to avoid litigious neighbors, she doesn’t use the elevator.

Chelsea Hotel
Chelsea Hotel, W 23rd street – Manhattan.Stefano Giovannini

“They trash me,” she said, adding that some prefer the hotel’s starving-artist past, when Madonna and Patti Smith lived in squalor. “I heard of one not wanting a private bathroom!” Indeed, some spaces share communal restrooms.

Carlson’s pad has two toilets, but she said both are out of service: “Did they expect me to use a litter box?”

“A few tenants won’t let the hotel be finished,” nightclub promoter Susanne Bartsch, who has lived at the Chelsea for 39 years, told The Post. “I am sick of the dust. Why not let owners finish their f–king hotel?”

Construction has been ongoing since 2011, when the building was sold to the first of three recent owners; Drukier and his partners bought it in 2016 for about

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