Tag: CDC

U.S. reports record 187,833 new Covid cases as CDC warns against Thanksgiving travel

  • The U.S. reported 187,833 new Covid-19 cases on Thursday, a record-breaking daily count as the federal government asks Americans to remain home for Thanksgiving.
  • A record 80,698 Covid-19 patients were in the hospital on Thursday, according to the Covid Tracking Project.
  • The U.S. death toll hit a weekly average of 1,335 people on Thursday, a figure last reported in May, according to Hopkins data.



a man walking down a street next to a car: Medical workers wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) administer Covid-19 tests at a drive-thru testing site at the Alemany Farmers Market in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020.


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Medical workers wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) administer Covid-19 tests at a drive-thru testing site at the Alemany Farmers Market in San Francisco, California, U.S., on Thursday, Nov. 19, 2020.

The United States reported 187,833 new Covid-19 cases on Thursday, yet another record-breaking daily total as U.S. health officials urge Americans to stay home for Thanksgiving and states impose tighter restrictions to slow the persistent spread of the virus.

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“We’re alarmed,” Dr. Henry Walke, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Covid-19 incident manager, said during a press briefing Thursday where the agency urged people not to travel over Thanksgiving.

“One of our concerns is that as people over the holiday season get together, they may actually be bringing infections with them to that small gathering and not even know it,” he said.

The U.S. first crossed 100,000 new Covid-19 cases on the Nov. 3, Election Day, and infections have continued to climb to all-time highs ever since. The nation has reported a weekly average of 165,029 new cases every day, a record-breaking streak that’s lasted for 24 consecutive days, according to a CNBC analysis of data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.



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Unlike other peaks in the spring and summer that hit the Northeast and Sunbelt states, infectious disease experts have said the latest surge has no clear epicenter. Some state and city officials have warned that there’s so much spread, local outbreaks cannot be traced back to a single event or venue.

“I believe this is the most serious public health moment we’ve experienced since 1918 and the swine flu,” Dr. Michael Osterholm, a coronavirus advisor to President-elect Joe Biden, told CNBC’s Meg Tirrell during a Healthy Returns: The Path Forward event on Friday.

“We realize that we have a very dangerous period for the next two weeks that we’re going to have to respond to. We’re already watching our hospitals being overrun,” Osterholm said.

In the U.S., a record 80,698 Covid-19 patients were in the hospital Thursday, according to the Covid Tracking Project, which is run by journalists at The Atlantic. Hospitals in at least 25 states are critically short of health-care workers to care for the influx of coronavirus patients, with some people traveling hundreds of miles for an open hospital bed, STAT News reported.

A handful of states and cities are closing nonessential businesses, limiting public and private gatherings and imposing curfews to try to slow the rapid spread. Some Republican leaders in Iowa, North Dakota and Utah, who have long resisted statewide mask requirements, are now ordering residents to wear

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CDC Begs Not to Travel, Home Sales on Fire & All ‘Likes’ Lead to Rome on Cheddar

Here are the headlines you Need2Know for Friday, November 20, 2020:

CERTIFICATION DEADLINES 

Georgia has finished its hand recount, affirming that Joe Biden won the state. President Trump has invited Michigan Republican legislators to the White House today, an extremely unusual move as his legal team attempts to overturn the results of the election in that state. Georgia has to certify its election results today by law. Michigan and Pennsylvania’s deadline to certify is on Monday. Those three states, combined with the states where the results are not being contested plus Minnesota on Tuesday, would give President-elect Biden more than 270 electoral votes and thus would make him the certified winner. Election law experts, constitutional scholars, the right-leaning Chamber of Commerce, and a small but growing number of Congressional Republicans are urging the president to accept defeat, worrying that a continued assault on the vote is doing significant damage to the integrity of America’s electoral process. AP

COVID-19: THANKSGIVING VIGILANCE

The CDC is all but begging Americans not to travel for Thanksgiving. The agency gave its first media briefing in months for the purpose of recommending that people stay home for the holiday and celebrate only with members of their own households. Meanwhile, the White House coronavirus task force returned to tell Americans to “increase their vigilance” ahead of a vaccine rollout. Dr. Fauci made a point of saying that the two vaccines that are close to being approved had not been rushed and are “really solid.” CHEDDAR

TREASURY CUTS OFF AID

The Treasury Dept. will not allow some of the Fed’s successful lending programs for small and midsize businesses to be extended past the end of the year, a move that could hamstring the economic recovery just as a new administration is taking office. Treasury Sec. Steve Mnuchin told the central bank to return nearly $500 billion in unused funding to Congress, drawing a rare rebuke from Fed Chair Jerome Powell. Powell wrote in a letter that those lending facilities are still needed and the money provides an important backstop if the economy gets worse. POLITICO

PHX RECORD HEAT

A late-season heat wave in the Southwest is shattering records left and right, with Phoenix on track to break its record for most 90-degree days in a calendar year. The city broke its record for the latest 90-degree day of the season twice already this week. A slight cool-off is forecast for Thanksgiving week. ACCUWEATHER

HOME SALES OFF THE CHARTS

The U.S. housing market is on absolute fire. Home sales rose in October to their highest level since 2006, powered by rock-bottom interest rates, higher household savings rates, and the desire to splurge for more space as many families — especially Millennials — continue to work, eat, learn and do pretty much everything from home. It’s not just existing-home sales, either. The shortage of housing across the country is powering demand for newly-built homes, too, which has the knock-on effect of creating jobs in the construction industry and robust sales
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CDC warns against Thanksgiving travel as Covid-19 cases spike

After close contacts get Covid, acting Sec. Def. Chris Miller won’t isolate

Two people tested positive for coronavirus after having close contact with acting Secretary of Defense Chris Miller, who will not conduct a period of self-isolation as is recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, according to a Pentagon spokesperson.

Anthony Tata, who is performing the duties of the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy, tested positive for the coronavirus on Friday and twice subsequently, chief Pentagon spokesperson Jonathan Hoffman said in a statement.

Tata was tested because the Lithuanian Embassy informed the Pentagon that its Defense Minister, Raimundas Karoblis, tested positive for Covid-19.

Karoblis visited the Pentagon over several days in the last week, where he met with Miller, Tata, as well as Secretary of Navy Kenneth Braithwaite.

Miller and others won’t isolate, the Pentagon spokesperson said:

“As CDC COVID mitigation guidelines were followed during the Acting Secretary’s bilateral meeting with the minister, as well as meetings with Mr. Tata, Acting Secretary of Defense Miller is not quarantining,” the Pentagon said.

U.S. crosses 190,000 new daily Covid-19 cases

More than 193,000 people reported new Covid-19 infections in the U.S. Thursday, a new record. County and state health departments across the country reported 1,945 deaths. 

According to NBC News’ tally, case counts have exceeded 100,000 for more than two weeks now. In the last week, an average 165,665 cases have been confirmed per day, up more than double from the average 80,669 cases per day the U.S. was averaging four weeks ago.

Several records were set Thursday on the state level:

  • Iowa reported 39 Covid-19 deaths, tying its record set the day before.
  • Kentucky reported 3,637 cases
  • Maryland had 2,912 cases
  • 72 reported dead in Minnesota
  • 28 deaths in Nebraska
  • 2,416 cases in Nevada
  • 528 cases in New Hampshire
  • 4,491 new cases in New Jersey
  • 3,665 cases in New Mexico
  • Oregon reported 20 dead
  • Vermont reported 149 new cases
  • Wyoming reported 21 deaths

Track surges across the states.

Need a negative test before heading to Hawaii, governor says

HONOLULU — Anyone flying to Hawaii will be required to have a negative Covid-19 test result prior to their departure for the state, with the new rule going into effect two days before Thanksgiving, Gov. David Ige announced Thursday.

Until now, passengers flying to the islands using a pre-travel testing program were permitted to arrive and then upload their negative test results to a state database, allowing them to skip two weeks of quarantine.

Hong Kong suspends in-person classes for some students for 2 weeks

HONG KONG — Hong Kong has suspended in-person classes for lower primary school students after the city’s top health official said the coronavirus situation in the territory was rapidly deteriorating.

Classes for primary 1 to 3 students

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Updated CDC guidance: Don’t travel for Thanksgiving

With the coronavirus surging out of control, the nation’s top public health agency pleaded with Americans on Thursday not to travel for Thanksgiving and not to spend the holiday with people from outside their household.

It was some of the firmest guidance yet from the government on curtailing traditional gatherings to fight the outbreak.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued the recommendations just one week before Thanksgiving, at a time when diagnosed infections, hospitalizations and deaths are skyrocketing across the country. In many areas, the health care system is being squeezed by a combination of sick patients filling up beds and medical workers falling ill themselves.

The CDC’s Dr. Erin Sauber-Schatz cited more than 1 million new cases in the U.S. over the past week as the reason for the new guidance.

“The safest way to celebrate Thanksgiving this year is at home with the people in your household,” she said.


It comes as COVID-19 cases in the U.S. reached another daily high Thursday with over 185,000 new infections, according to Johns Hopkins University data.

The previous high of 177,224 was set Friday.

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A complete breakdown of the CDC’s Thanksgiving guidelines can be found here.

If families do decide to include returning college students, military members or others for turkey and stuffing, the CDC is recommending that the hosts take added precautions: Gatherings should be outdoors if possible, with people keeping 6 feet apart and wearing masks and just one person serving the food.

Whether Americans heed the warning is another matter. The deadly comeback by the virus has been blamed in part on pandemic fatigue, or people getting tired of masks and other precautions. And surges were seen last summer after Memorial Day and July Fourth, despite blunt warnings from health authorities.

The United States has seen more than 11 million diagnosed infections and over 250,000 deaths from the coronavirus. CDC scientists believe that somewhere around 40% of people who are infected do not have obvious symptoms but can still spread the virus.

The CDC advises to take the following questions into consideration if you are thinking about traveling for Thanksgiving. If the answer to any question is “yes,” the CDC advises against traveling.

  • Are you, someone in your household, or someone you will be visiting at increased risk for getting very sick from COVID-19?
  • Are cases high or increasing in your community or your destination? Check CDC’s COVID Data Tracker for the latest number of cases.
  • Are hospitals in your community or your destination overwhelmed with patients who have COVID-19? To find out, check state and local public health department websites.
  • Does your home or destination have requirements or restrictions for travelers? Check state and local requirements before you travel.
  • During the 14 days before your travel, have you or those you are visiting had close contact with people they don’t live with?
  • Do your plans include traveling by bus, train, or air which might make staying 6 feet apart difficult?
  • Are you traveling with
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CDC recommends Americans don’t travel for Thanksgiving

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Holidays are usually for gatherings but many get-togethers are complicated or canceled because of COVID-19.

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is recommending against travel for Thanksgiving. 

During a news briefing Thursday, Dr. Henry Walke, the CDC’s COVID-19 incident manager, said the agency is “recommending against travel during the Thanksgiving period.”

“The tragedy that could happen is that one of your family members is coming to this family gathering and they could end up severely ill, hospitalized or dying. And we don’t want that to happen,” he said, as COVID-19 cases tick up across the country. “These times are tough, it’s been a long outbreak, almost 11 months, and we understand people are tired.”

He continued: “We understand that people want to see their family and relatives and do it as they’ve always done it. But this year we’re asking them to limit their travel.”

Walke added that Americans who do decide to travel for the holiday should do so “as safely as possible by following the same recommendations for everyday living,” including wearing a mask, staying 6 feet apart and washing your hands. 

Roger Dow, president and CEO of the U.S. Travel Association, an industry group, said he expects some people to heed the CDC’s recommendation but noted that AAA projects that 50 million Americans will travel for Thanksgiving.

“We’re equally sure that many will chose to travel,” he said, adding, “If you travel, you must travel safely.”

As for specific Thanksgiving gathering safety tips, the CDC recommends:

  • Bringing your own food, drinks, plates, cups and utensils
  • Avoiding passing by areas where food is being prepared, such as the kitchen
  • Using single-use options, like salad dressing and condiment packets
  • Using disposable items like food containers, plates and utensils.

The holidays are coming: What experts say about even small family gatherings

If you plan to host a gathering, the CDC recommends keeping it outdoors, limiting the number of people and having guests bring their own food and drink. If food is being shared, the agency suggests having only one person serve the food.

Walke also warned about who should and shouldn’t be considered safe after traveling to the gathering.

“Anyone who has not lived in your household for the last 14 days should not be considered a member of your household,” he said. “Regardless of where they’ve been, if they’re coming home and they haven’t been living with you, you definitely need to take precautions. Having their own bathroom for someone who might be an overnight guest, for example.”

That guidance includes college students returning home, the CDC said when it released details. While colleges are pleading with students to get tested or quarantine before they return home, they remain at risk to develop COVID-19 after receiving a negative test or while traveling home.

The CDC’s warning is the latest and most high profile about the risks of traveling as coronavirus cases surge across the country.

Officials in states including California and Illinois have urged residents

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California Gov. Gavin Newsom sets 10 p.m. curfew; CDC discourages travel; 15 college football games canceled this week

The U.S. death toll from coronavirus has surpassed 250,000, including 1,700 reported Wednesday alone. Hospitalizations across the nation have exploded, with almost 80,000 Americans now receiving inpatient treatment.

COVID-19 has now killed a quarter of a million Americans

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Happy Thanksgiving? Not so much.

New York canceled its massive Thanksgiving Day parade weeks ago. Houston followed suit and Detroit is planning a virtual event as well.

Start the day smarter. Get all the news you need in your inbox each morning.

Many universities are urging students not to go home for the holidays, concerned about igniting a nationwide burst of new cases. Some schools are suggesting that students that do go home not come back, fearing an outbreak of infections on campus.



a man holding a sign: With a map of the country's COVID-19 outbreak behind her, Dr. Deborah Birx, the White House's coronavirus response coordinator, speaks during a task force briefing on Thursday.


© Susan Walsh, AP
With a map of the country’s COVID-19 outbreak behind her, Dr. Deborah Birx, the White House’s coronavirus response coordinator, speaks during a task force briefing on Thursday.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention chimed in Thursday, recommending Americans simply not travel for the holiday. 

“The tragedy that could happen is that one of your family members is coming to this family gathering and they could end up severely ill, hospitalized or dying,” said Dr. Henry Walke, the CDC’s COVID-19 incident manager. “We don’t want that to happen.”

📈 Today’s numbers: The U.S. has reported more than 11.6 million cases and more than 252,200 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University data. The global totals: 56.7 million cases and 1.35 million deaths.

🗺️ Mapping coronavirus: Track the U.S. outbreak in your state.

This file will be updated throughout the day. For updates in your inbox, subscribe to The Daily Briefing newsletter.

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Don’t Travel For Thanksgiving, CDC Warns : Coronavirus Updates : NPR

An airport employee walks through Reagan National Airport in Arlington, Va., earlier this year. On Thursday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned that Americans should refrain from traveling for the upcoming holiday.

Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images


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An airport employee walks through Reagan National Airport in Arlington, Va., earlier this year. On Thursday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warned that Americans should refrain from traveling for the upcoming holiday.

Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP via Getty Images

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is strongly recommending that people stay home for Thanksgiving to help prevent the spread of the coronavirus. With the holiday one week away, the agency issued a statement that taking a trip to see loved ones is simply inadvisable right now.

“Travel may increase your chance of getting and spreading COVID-19,” the CDC explained in an advisory released Thursday. “Postponing travel and staying home is the best way to protect yourself and others this year.”

The better bet, the CDC advised, was for people instead to spend Thanksgiving with the folks with whom they have been living for the two weeks leading up to the holiday.

“If people have not been actively living with you for the 14 days before you’re celebrating, they’re not considered a member of your household,” Erin Sauber-Schatz of the CDC said at a news briefing Thursday. “And therefore you need to take those extra precautions, even wearing masks within your own home.”

If you do travel, the CDC advised that you take a series of steps to protect yourself and others — including wearing a mask, staying 6 feet from others and frequently washing your hands. But the agency added: “Celebrating virtually or with the people you live with is the safest choice this Thanksgiving.”

The agency’s recommendation came less than a day after the U.S. marked a grim milestone in its fight to slow the spread of the coronavirus. As of Wednesday, more than 250,000 Americans have died from COVID-19, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.

What’s more, the spread of the disease appears to be exploding in the U.S., with several dozen states shattering records for daily new confirmed cases in the past week alone. The virus appears to be savaging the middle of the country, in particular, with records for new cases per capita being set from Montana to Nebraska.

Roughly 1 million new COVID-19 cases have been recorded in the U.S. in the past week.

The dire numbers already had people reconsidering their Thanksgiving plans before the rollout of the new CDC recommendations, as NPR’s David Schaper noted. AAA estimated that fewer Americans would be traveling for the holiday than last year — though this year’s number still hovers around 50 million people.

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Coronavirus: CDC urges Americans not to travel for Thanksgiving

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The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has told Americans to avoid travel for the Thanksgiving holiday amid soaring Covid-19 cases.

“In the last week, we’ve seen over a million new cases,” said the CDC’s Erin Sauber-Schatz to reporters on Thursday. “Thanksgiving is a week away.”

But the agency stopped short of issuing a travel ban for Americans.

The US has so far recorded more than 11.6 million coronavirus infections and more than 250,000 deaths.

Thanksgiving typically heralds the busiest week for travel in the US. Last year, an estimated 26 million travellers passed through the country’s airports in the week surrounding the holiday.

“It’s not a requirement. It’s a recommendation for the American public to consider,” Dr Henry Walke, the CDC’s Covid-19 incident manager, said during Thursday’s press briefing.

“Right now, especially as we’re seeing this sort of exponential growth in cases, and the opportunity to translocate disease or infection from one part of the country to another, it leads to our recommendation to avoid travel at this time.”

Also on Thursday, the White House coronavirus task force had its first public briefing in months. Members of the task force, including Vice-President Mike Pence, noted the rise in coronavirus cases and positivity rates – meaning the percentage of coronavirus tests that come back positive – across the country.

“This is really a call to action for every American to increase their vigilance,” said task force coordinator Dr Deborah Birx. “This is more cases, more rapidly, than what we had seen before.”

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Dr Deborah Birx warned of rising infections across the US

Though Dr Birx urged Americans to limit indoor interactions – like the type of group gatherings characteristic of Thanksgiving – the task force did not comment specifically on holiday travel. And Mr Pence in particular maintained an upbeat tone, emphasising the recent progress in vaccine development and touting the country’s improved preparedness.

“American has never been more prepared to combat this virus than we have been today,” the vice-president said.

The White House has so far declined to engage with President-elect Joe Biden and his incoming administration on coronavirus policy, as President Donald Trump refuses to concede the presidential contest.

Mr Biden on Thursday called Mr Trump’s failure to concede an “incredibly damaging message” for the rest of the world. The Democrat has said that co-ordination is necessary to combat the coronavirus outbreak.

Asked on Thursday if he would close down the economy in an effort to curb the outbreak, Mr Biden dismissed the notion of a nationwide shutdown.

“I’m going to shut down the virus. That’s what I’m going to shut down,” he said. “There’s no circumstance which I can see that would require total national shutdown.”


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Coronavirus live news: China has given 1m people Sinopharm vaccine; US CDC warns against Thanksgiving travel | World news





California enacts coronavirus curfew for majority of state’s 40m residents





CDC advises against Thanksgiving travel

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has advised Americans not to travel for next week’s Thanksgiving holiday, due to the nationwide surge in new coronavirus cases.

“CDC is recommending against travel during the Thanksgiving period,” Dr Henry Walke, the CDC’s coronavirus incident manager, said during a briefing today.

“For Americans who decide to travel, CDC recommends doing so as safely as possible by following the same recommendations for everyday living,” Walke added.

Walke particularly expressed fear about the possibility of Americans unknowingly spreading coronavirus to family members, saying, “One of our concerns is that as people over the holiday season get together, they may actually be bringing infections with them to that small gathering and not even know it.”

In a set of updated guidelines, the CDC recommended celebrating Thanksgiving virtually or only with members of one’s own household.

The guidance says, “In-person gatherings that bring together family members or friends from different households, including college students returning home, pose varying levels of risk.”

The news comes a day after the US coronavirus death toll surpassed 250,000, which is far higher than any other country in the world:





China has given 1m people Sinopharm vaccine

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CDC Recommends Against Travel for Thanksgiving Holiday Amid Coronavirus Surge | National News

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Thursday strongly recommended against traveling for Thanksgiving while the U.S. sees a record-breaking surge in its coronavirus outbreak.

“CDC is recommending against travel during the Thanksgiving period,” Henry Walke, CDC’s COVID-19 incident manager, said on a call with reporters Thursday. “For Americans who decide to travel, CDC recommends doing so as safely as possible by following the same recommendations for everyday living.”

In update guidance, the agency recommended celebrating the holiday either virtually or with those in the household, which it defines as “anyone who currently lives and shares common spaces in your housing unit.”

“People who do not currently live in your housing unit, such as college students who are returning home from school for the holidays, should be considered part of different households,” the CDC said.

World Braces For Another Wave of Coronavirus

TOPSHOT - A resident (L) of the Domenico Sartor nursing home in Castelfranco Veneto, near Venice, hugs her visiting daughter on November 11, 2020 through a plastic screen in a so-called "Hug Room" amid the new coronavirus pandemic. - The Hug Room allows guests and their families to embrace each other, while remaining separate and protected from the contagious disease, still guaranteeing physical contact for mental and emotional wellbeing. (Photo by Piero CRUCIATTI / AFP) (Photo by PIERO CRUCIATTI/AFP via Getty Images)

If someone hasn’t been actively living in the household for 14 days, people should take extra precautions, like wearing a mask in the home.

“From an individual household level, what’s at stake is basically the increased chance of one of your loved ones becoming sick and then being hospitalized and dying,” Walke said.

The updated guidance comes the day after the U.S. saw its highest daily death toll from the virus since May and topped 250,000 total fatalities.

“We’re alarmed, again, with the exponential increases in cases, hospitalizations and deaths,” Walke said.

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