Tag: cases

Millions ignore travel warning as COVID-19 cases surge nationwide

With millions of Americans on the move Wednesday, health experts worry what is usually one of the country’s biggest nights for travel may also become one of its most dangerous. Despite the surge in new coronavirus cases, AAA expects up to 50 million Americans to travel.

More than 2.3 million people have been infected nationwide in the past two weeks, and more than 2,000 have died in the past 24 hours, according to figures from Johns Hopkins University. That’s the highest single-day death toll in more than six months.

Despite blunt warnings from public health officials pleading for people to stay home this Thanksgiving, millions are hitting the skies and roads anyway. 

Romeo Garcio left Maryland on Wednesday afternoon for his parents’ home in Greenville, North Carolina.

“The holidays are really the only times where I could be able to see my family,” he said.

When asked if he was worried at all about bringing the coronavirus home with him, Garcio replied, “Not at all. I’ve been tested. I’m negative.”

But that wasn’t enough for Tom Wilson. He made the agonizing decision not to spend Thanksgiving with his family.

“It just seemed like a risk that wasn’t worth taking,” Wilson said.

Meanwhile, there’s a growing patchwork of restrictions in cities and states that are intended to stop the virus’ spread. Fourteen states and Washington, D.C., call for mandatory testing or quarantine requirements for travelers. New York City police are setting up checkpoints at bridges and tunnels, and Maryland state troopers are checking if bars and restaurants are following the rules.

A stay-at-home advisory is now in place in Pennsylvania, and the state has ordered bars, restaurants and private catered events to stop alcohol sales for on-site consumption starting at 5 p.m. on Thanksgiving eve.

In Los Angeles County, dining at restaurants, breweries, wineries and bars will be restricted starting Wednesday. Beginning at 10 p.m., all eateries in the county will only be able to offer take-out, drive-thru and delivery services, CBS Los Angeles reports. 

From coast to coast, governors and mayors are practically begging people not to gather.

“Don’t make it harder on those frontline workers,” Minnesota Governor Tim Walz said. 

“To act like it’s a normal Thanksgiving is to deny reality,” New York Governor Andrew Cuomo stated.

Small gatherings are now a major driver of the virus spread. Fifteen members of a Texas family contracted COVID-19 at a birthday lunch.

“Please don’t be like my family and ignore the CDC guidelines,” one of the family members said in a video.

CBS News chief medical correspondent Dr. Jon LaPook has advice for people who have chosen to gather with friends and families.

“I think the safest thing is for people to assume they’re infected and infectious but they just don’t know it, even if they recently have tested negative,” he said.

Dr. LaPook added that masks should be worn during the gatherings, eating and socializing should be divided into separate areas, and windows and doors should be kept

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As airports are packed across the U.S., experts warn of ‘a surge’ of new cases after Thanksgiving

Despite warnings from public health officials not to travel for Thanksgiving, plenty of people are doing just that. Reports are piling in from airports across the country that describe large crowds. While most travelers wear masks, some photos clearly show people without face coverings.



a group of people standing around a bag of luggage: Travelers check in at Dulles International Airport in Dulles, Va., on Tuesday. (Photo: Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images)


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Travelers check in at Dulles International Airport in Dulles, Va., on Tuesday. (Photo: Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images)

Video shared on Twitter from Phoenix Sky Harbor Airport, in Arizona, shows a packed, standing-room-only airport as people wait at their gates to board flights.

At San Francisco International Airport, people can be seen crowded together in seats with plenty of others standing nearby as they wait to fly out.

In Des Moines, airport officials told the Des Moines Register that they expect a 50 percent increase in normal passenger traffic in the lead-up to Thanksgiving. And CBS Boston shared a video of Logan International Airport of long lines of people waiting to board flights and a packed check-in terminal. 

These reports come just days after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention urged people not to travel for the holiday. “Travel may increase your chance of getting and spreading COVID-19,” the organization says online. “Postponing travel and staying home is the best way to protect yourself and others this year.” The CDC also urged would-be travelers to ask themselves serious questions such as whether you or someone in your household is at an increased risk of getting very sick from COVID-19, whether cases are increasing in your community, and whether hospitals in your area are overwhelmed with COVID-19 patients.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the country’s top infectious disease doctor, also warned this week about holiday travel, saying during an appearance on CBS’ Face the Nation that people who are flying for the holiday “are going to get us into even more trouble than we’re in right now.”

Doctors say this could lead to superspreader events across the country

“Airports have done a lot to try to become safer since the pandemic began, and we haven’t heard about airport-based outbreaks,” Dr. Amesh A. Adalja, senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, tells Yahoo Life. But, he says, that was dependent on people following public health recommendations for preventing the spread of COVID-19, like physical distancing, wearing face masks as much as possible, and practicing good hand hygiene.

“Because Thanksgiving is a push for people to travel, most people who don’t adhere to protocols will be likely to be in airports,” Adalja says. “As a result, we will likely hear of more airport transmission.”

Dr. Richard Watkins, an infectious disease physician in Akron, Ohio,

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Spike in cases delays Singapore-Hong Kong travel bubble | World



Spike in cases delays Singapore-Hong Kong travel bubble

FILE – In this Oct. 9, 2020, file photo, people wearing masks to protect against the coronavirus, walk down a street in Hong Kong. Singapore and Hong Kong have postponed a planned air travel bubble meant to boost tourism for both cities, amid a spike in coronavirus infections in Hong Kong. The air travel bubble, originally slated to begin Sunday, will be delayed by at least two weeks, Hong Kong’s minister of commerce and economic development, Edward Yau, said at a news conference on Saturday, Nov. 21, 2020.




HONG KONG (AP) — Singapore and Hong Kong on Saturday postponed the start of an air travel bubble meant to boost tourism for both cities, citing a spike in infections in the Chinese territory as a “sober reminder” of risks to public health.

The travel bubble, originally slated to begin Sunday, will be delayed by at least two weeks, Hong Kong’s minister of commerce and economic development, Edward Yau, said at a news conference.

The arrangement is meant to allow travelers between the two cities to enter without quarantine as long as they complete coronavirus tests before and after arriving at their destinations, and fly on designated flights.

Hong Kong reported 43 new coronavirus cases on Saturday, including 13 untraceable local infections.

“For any scheme to be successful, they must fulfill the condition of securing public health, and also make sure that both sides would be comfortable and feel safe about the scheme,” Yau said. “In light of the situation in Hong Kong, I think it’s the responsible way to put this back for a while, and then sort of relaunch it at a suitable juncture.”

Under the initial agreement, the travel bubble was to be suspended if the number of untraceable local infections in either Singapore or Hong Kong exceeded five on a seven-day moving average. The current average in Hong Kong is nearly four, prompting Yau and Singapore’s transport minister, Ong Ye Kung, to postpone the inaugural flight.

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Americans want to travel for Thanksgiving, but the flood of Covid-19 cases can’t be ignored

Leading up to Thanksgiving, airlines in the United States were still somewhat upbeat about the prospects for the holiday travel season. There had been palpable pent-up demand among consumers to visit friends and family, and what better time than around the holidays to do that?



a group of people that are standing in the water: Passengers walk through Salt Lake City International Airport on October 27, 2020 in Salt Lake City.


© Rick Bowmer/AP
Passengers walk through Salt Lake City International Airport on October 27, 2020 in Salt Lake City.

But that outlook has dramatically changed as the seven-day average Covid-19 case count jumped between November 1 and November 15 and health and government officials warned against Thanksgiving travel and gatherings. Daily deaths from Covid-19 have been reaching levels not seen since the spring.

Major US carriers are now seeing rising cancellations and softness in bookings. The demand uptick they were counting on during the holidays is evaporating with the coronavirus surge. In a best-case scenario, any rise in demand won’t be nearly as large as had been anticipated only a couple of weeks ago.

Thanksgiving is typically one of the busiest periods of the year for airlines, with a record 31.6 million Americans flying in the days just before and after the holiday in 2019 . That amounted to about $8 billion out of $247 billion in total US airline revenue last year.

Based on current recovery trends and recent holiday travel increases, Oliver Wyman now projects a 60% to 65% decline in 2020’s Thanksgiving travel period over the same 12 days in 2019. Given the uncertainty over new government restrictions and rising case counts, we also see a potential for even more last-minute cancellations and cuts in capacity by airlines.

In anticipation of a bump in demand over the Thanksgiving holiday period, the airlines had expanded daily domestic schedules by more than 1,300 flights and 150,000 seats. Low-cost carriers have been particularly aggressive chasing holiday travel and have added to their flights and seats even more than the larger network airlines.

It’s not as if the optimism was unfounded: Americans really want to travel again. And after eight months of shutdowns, mask wearing and social distancing, pandemic fatigue and a bottled-up desire for normalcy might still push many to visit friends and family around the holiday — despite all the warnings not to. Expectations are for an even greater percentage than usual to opt for the perceived safety of their cars over transportation with strangers.

This shouldn’t come as a surprise — even though the seven-day average for new case counts is expected to top 180,000 a day by Thanksgiving, according to projections by the Oliver Wyman Pandemic Navigator. Travel by Americans also jumped over the Labor Day weekend, when medical experts expressed similar concerns about a potential spike in cases as a result of increased mobility and socializing.

Until the recent surge, personal judgment — ahead of government restrictions, guidance from the World Health Organization or Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or even the advent of a vaccine — had been governing individual decisions on travel. According to Oliver Wyman’s October

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Nikhil Dwivedi slams Bollywood stars posting vacation photos from Maldives amid surge in Covid-19 cases: ‘We are so self-absorbed’





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Actor and producer Nikhil Dwivedi feels that Bollywood stars posting pictures of themselves holidaying in the Maldives amid the Covid-19 pandemic is tone-deaf. Many parts of the country, including the capital, continue to witness a spike in new cases which has triggered an unemployment crisis.

Responding to a tweet by journalist Barkha Dutt, Nikhil wrote on Twitter that it might appear that celebrities are heartless, but that is not the case. They are ‘just plain stupid’, he said. “Absolutely. Then we r surprised at the suddenness of the backlash the movie industry receives for unrelated reasons. We r so self-absorbed &so oblivious to what’s around us tht we appear unempathatic. Let me also assure it’s not like they r heartless, none are.. just plain stupid,” he wrote.

Barkha had written, “With apology to #Maldives but I just cant bear to see one more sun-kissed, rippled water image from there while our COVID numbers surge & jobs plummet. Its sort of the November version of Banana Bread & Celebrities would be be well advised on the tone-deafness of it.”



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A number of Bollywood celebrities are currently in the Maldives, including actors Sonakshi Sinha, Rakul Preet Singh, Tara Sutaria and Aadar Jain, and have been sharing glimpses of their beach vacation. Several more had taken off to the island nation in the last few weeks for a quick getaway, including actors Taapsee Pannu, Tiger Shroff, Disha Patani, Mouni Roy, Neha Dhupia, Angad Bedi and Kajal Aggarwal.

Also read: Ankita Lokhande and boyfriend Vicky Jain take over Instagram with new dance video in ‘night dresses’. Watch

Nikhil tested positive for Covid-19 last week and is under home quarantine. He recently announced his next production, a naagin trilogy starring Shraddha Kapoor.

In an interview with Hindustan Times, he said that the concept of an ichchadhari naagin is not all that outlandish. “I keep giving the example of Spider Man, which is about a college-going boy who gets bitten by a spider and jumps from one building to another. We are equally ready for an ichchadhari naagin. It depends on how you want it to come on screen. Eventually, it is a fantasy. If a Spider Man or a Superman can exist, so can a shape-shifting snake. Twilight is one of the most successful films; it is believable because we know it is a fantasy,” he said, adding that their films will be ‘very contemporary’ and different from what has been made before.

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US coroanvirus: Hospitalizations and Covid-19 cases soar as country enters one of the busiest travel weeks of the year

Historically, the week of Thanksgiving is one of the busiest for travel. But with the US reporting its 20th day in a row of more than 100,000 new cases Sunday, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advised against traveling for the holiday this year to decrease risk of spreading infections.

As new cases spike, hospitalization rates have followed. At least 83,870 Covid-19 patients were hospitalized Sunday — the 13th straight day the US has broken its hospitalization record, according to the Covid Tracking Project.

Health experts have long worried that the colder months could drive people indoors, leading to a rise in infection rates. On Friday, the CDC said that 50% of cases are spread by people without symptoms. With just one infected person having the potential to cause an outbreak, experts worry that people traveling and gathering could prove dangerous to the American public that is still in the thick of the pandemic.

State leaders warn against superspreader events

As the pandemic devastates regions across the country, many state leaders are urging residents to follow recommended guidelines.

Oregon reported a record high for three days in a row with 1,517 new cases on Sunday. Gov. Kate Brown ordered a two week “social freeze” on November 18 and warned residents Sunday not to attend large Thanksgiving gatherings.

“Our hospitals are simply too strained for superspreader events,” Brown tweeted.
Masks mandates worked to slow the spread of Covid-19 in Kansas, CDC research shows

In Nevada, cases are rising at “wildfire level,” Gov. Steve Sisolak said. He announced new restrictions will begin Tuesday, including a mask mandate indoors and outdoors for residents and visitors, limiting private gatherings to ten people or less and requiring restaurant reservations to be for no more than four people at a table.

El Paso, Texas, has a record number of active cases with 35,963 as of Sunday, according to the El Paso Department of Health. The case load has motivated the Texas National Guard to “provide mortuary support,” County Judge Ricardo Samaniego told CNN affiliate KVIA.

“Right now they’re helping us with the overflow of transporting where the trailers are, trying to get some movement so we don’t have any backup,” Samaniego told KVIA. “We’ve got a lot of loved ones waiting for relatives and moms and dads.”

On Friday, Samaniego sent a letter to Texas Gov. Greg Abbott in hopes of reinstating a curfew for El Paso county as Covid-19 cases continue to surge in the area.

Promising vaccine developments

Americans likely still have a while to wait for a vaccine, but there are promising developments in the research.

The US Food and Drug Administration has set a meeting December 10 for the Vaccines and Related Biological Products Advisory Committee to discuss an emergency use authorization request for a vaccine candidate, FDA Commissioner Dr. Stephen Hahn tweeted on Sunday.

Most coronavirus cases are spread by people without symptoms, CDC now says

“While we can’t predict how long FDA’s review will take, the agency will review the request as expeditiously as possible, while still doing so in a thorough and science-based manner, so that we can help make available a vaccine

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Hospitalizations and Covid-19 cases soar as country enters one of the busiest travel weeks of the year

From surging case numbers to record hospitalizations, the US is grappling with what experts long warned could be the biggest spike in the Covid-19 pandemic — and it still has to get through the Thanksgiving holiday.



a group of people standing in front of a store: Travelers walk through Newark International Airport on November 21, 2020 in Newark, New Jersey. - Current US numbers -- more than a quarter of a million deaths have been reported -- have alarmed authorities enough to advise that people stay home for the November 26 Thanksgiving holiday, when Americans usually travel to be with their families. (Photo by Kena Betancur / AFP) (Photo by KENA BETANCUR/AFP via Getty Images)


© KENA BETANCUR/AFP/Getty Images
Travelers walk through Newark International Airport on November 21, 2020 in Newark, New Jersey. – Current US numbers — more than a quarter of a million deaths have been reported — have alarmed authorities enough to advise that people stay home for the November 26 Thanksgiving holiday, when Americans usually travel to be with their families. (Photo by Kena Betancur / AFP) (Photo by KENA BETANCUR/AFP via Getty Images)

Historically, the week of Thanksgiving is one of the busiest for travel. But with the US reporting its 20th day in a row of more than 100,000 new cases Sunday, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention advised against traveling for the holiday this year to decrease risk of spreading infections.

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As new cases spike, hospitalization rates have followed. At least 83,870 Covid-19 patients were hospitalized Sunday — the 13th straight day the US has broken its hospitalization record, according to the Covid Tracking Project.

Still, more than a million people passed through airports on Friday alone, according to the Transportation Security Administration.

While people board airplanes and load cars to visit family, the US has reported a million infections in under a week. Since the pandemic began, more than 12.2 million people have been infected and 256,783 people have died of the virus, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

Health experts have long worried that the colder months could drive people indoors, leading to a rise in infection rates. On Friday, the CDC said that 50% of cases are spread by people without symptoms. With just one infected person having the potential to cause an outbreak, experts worry that people traveling and gathering could prove dangerous to the American public that is still in the thick of the pandemic.

State leaders warn against superspreader events

As the pandemic devastates regions across the country, many state leaders are urging residents to follow recommended guidelines.

Oregon reported a record high for three days in a row with 1,517 new cases on Sunday. Gov. Kate Brown ordered a two week “social freeze” on November 18 and warned residents Sunday not to attend large Thanksgiving gatherings.

“Our hospitals are simply too strained for superspreader events,” Brown tweeted.

In Nevada, cases are rising at “wildfire level,” Gov. Steve Sisolak said. He announced new restrictions will begin Tuesday, including a mask mandate indoors and outdoors for residents and visitors, limiting private gatherings to ten people or less and requiring restaurant reservations to be for no more than four people at a table.

El Paso, Texas, has a record number of active cases with 35,963 as of Sunday, according to the El Paso Department of Health. The case load has motivated the Texas National Guard to “provide mortuary support,” County Judge Ricardo Samaniego

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Cases in Japan hit record amid holiday travel

TOKYO (AP) — The daily tally of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Japan hit a record for the fourth day at 2,508, the Health Ministry said Sunday.

Japan has had fewer than 2,000 coronavirus-related deaths so far, avoiding the toll of harder hit nations. But fears are growing about another surge. A flurry of criticism from opposition legislators and the public has slammed the government for being too slow in halting its “GoTo” tourism campaign, which encouraged travel and dining out with discounts.

Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga on Saturday scrapped the campaign, but only after many people had already made travel reservations for a three-day Thanksgiving weekend in Japan.

Airports and restaurants have been packed. Some say the government should have offered to pay for cancellations, or stepped up PCR testing instead, if the goal is to keep the economy going amid a pandemic. Tutorials are circulating online on the proper way to eat and drink at restaurants while wearing masks.

In other developments in the Asia-Pacific region:

— India has registered 45,209 new confirmed cases in the past 24 hours amid a festival season surge in the country’s capital and many other parts. At least three Indian states — Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh and Gujarat — have imposed night curfews in many cities. The Health Ministry on Sunday also registered 501 deaths in the past 24 hours, taking total fatalities up to 133,227. While the overall pace of new cases appears to be slowing, experts have cautioned that official figures may be offering false hope since many infections are undetected.

— South Australia and Victoria states eased COVID-19 restrictions Sunday as Australia heads into summer in a better position to fight the virus. Victoria, which was hardest hit, has gone 23 days without a new infection. In response, Premier Daniel Andrews announced a number of changes to restrictions. Mask-wearing outdoors, which until now has been mandatory, is no longer required where social distancing is possible. Masks will still have to be worn indoors and carried at all times. Home gatherings of up to 15 people will be allowed and up to 50 people can gather outdoors. Up to 150 people will be allowed at weddings, funerals or indoor religious services. Residents of South Australia emerged from a state-wide lockdown at midnight Saturday, and are now able to visit bars and restaurants in groups of up to 10 and host gatherings up of to 50 people with social distancing. Gyms and beauty salons can open and students will return to schools from Monday. The border between Victoria and New South Wales states, closed at the height of the Victoria outbreak three months ago, will reopen Sunday. New South Wales Premier Gladys Berejiklian said, “We never want to see this ever again. We hope this is the last time that in our lifetime this border is closed.”

— Authorities are conducting mass testing and shutting down schools after China reported three new domestically transmitted cases in the past 24 hours — two in

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As U.S. coronavirus cases soar toward 200,000 a day, holiday travel is surging

Total coronavirus infections in the United States have topped 12 million, and cases are approaching 200,000 in a day, as health experts warn of an alarming new stage in the pandemic’s spread while Americans embark on holiday travel that could seed more outbreaks.



a group of people standing in an airport: Travelers retrieve their luggage at Newark International Airport on Saturday in Newark The CDC has advised that people stay home for the Thanksgiving holiday. (Photo by Kena Betancur / AFP)


© Kena Betancur/AFP/Getty Images
Travelers retrieve their luggage at Newark International Airport on Saturday in Newark The CDC has advised that people stay home for the Thanksgiving holiday. (Photo by Kena Betancur / AFP)

A fall wave of the virus ushered in by colder weather is only worsening, outpacing expansions in testing and making new nationwide records routine. The country passed 11 million cases just a week ago, and daily infections are on track to double since Nov. 4, when they exceeded 100,000 for the first time.

As Anthony S. Fauci, the country’s top infectious-disease expert, put it recently on MSNBC: “It’s almost exponential when you compare the curves in the spring and the curves in the summer with the inflection of the curve where we are right now.”

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended Thursday against traveling and congregating for Thanksgiving, using its first news briefing in months to sound alarms over the massive case rise reported in the past week. The United States has surpassed a quarter-million deaths related to covid-19.

But more than 1 million people still passed through the country’s airports Friday in the second-highest single-day rush of travelers since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, even as air travel has dropped dramatically over this time last year. On the same date in 2019, more than 2.5 million people traveled through U.S. airports.

The data on Transportation Security Administration screenings shows that many Americans are heeding calls for caution. But the fallout from this week is expected to amp up pressure on hospitals and health care workers at a critical time in the pandemic. Hospitalizations have soared to all-time highs, pushing state after state to enact new restrictions such as mask mandates, curfews and renewed business shutdowns.

“The scary news is that this week will probably have the highest amount of travel we have seen since the pandemic began,” said Christopher Worsham, a critical care physician and research fellow at Harvard Medical School.

He said he is more worried about what will happen when travelers get to their destinations — and as people from different households gather indoors, where the virus can spread more easily, often with more vulnerable older family members. Worsham said he has been hearing about people being treated as “the bad guy” for trying to keep their relatives and communities safe.

“We have to remember that the virus does not care that it is the holidays, that you are family, and that you have already gone a long time without seeing one another — if given opportunities to spread, the virus will spread,” he said.

Some passengers are facing crowded terminals as they wait to board flights. Video of busy seating areas at Phoenix Sky Harbor

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As U.S. coronavirus cases soar, Thanksgiving travel surge amps up

As Anthony S. Fauci, the country’s top infectious-disease expert, put it recently on MSNBC: “It’s almost exponential when you compare the curves in the spring and the curves in the summer with the inflection of the curve where we are right now.”

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended Thursday against traveling and congregating for Thanksgiving, using its first news briefing in months to sound alarms over the massive case rise reported in the past week. The United States has surpassed a quarter-million deaths related to covid-19.

But more than 1 million people still passed through the country’s airports Friday in the second-highest single-day rush of travelers since the start of the coronavirus pandemic, even as air travel has dropped dramatically over this time last year. On the same date in 2019, more than 2.5 million people traveled through U.S. airports.

The data on Transportation Security Administration screenings shows that many Americans are heeding calls for caution. But the fallout from this week is expected to amp up pressure on hospitals and health care workers at a critical time in the pandemic. Hospitalizations have soared to all-time highs, pushing state after state to enact new restrictions such as mask mandates, curfews and renewed business shutdowns.

“The scary news is that this week will probably have the highest amount of travel we have seen since the pandemic began,” said Christopher Worsham, a critical care physician and research fellow at Harvard Medical School.

He said he is more worried about what will happen when travelers get to their destinations — and as people from different households gather indoors, where the virus can spread more easily, often with more vulnerable older family members. Worsham said he has been hearing about people being treated as “the bad guy” for trying to keep their relatives and communities safe.

“We have to remember that the virus does not care that it is the holidays, that you are family, and that you have already gone a long time without seeing one another — if given opportunities to spread, the virus will spread,” he said.

Some passengers are facing crowded terminals as they wait to board flights. Video of busy seating areas at Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport made the rounds on social media Friday, as travelers said that the CDC’s guidance a day earlier had either not registered or not made a difference in their decision-making.

“I have a life to live and things to do, so we take necessary precautions,” Curt Vurpillat, who was heading to Chicago, told news outlet AZFamily.

Brandi McRae, an IT asset and capacity manager from South Florida, told The Washington Post she was alarmed to see long security lines and tightly packed clusters of people in the corridors of Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport on Saturday morning.

“It was a bit overwhelming,” said McRae, 31. “It was less crowded as I walked to my gate, but all I could think was that there would be very little way for so many

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