Tag: cases

City Suspends Indoor Recreation Due To Rise In Covid-19 Cases

Oakland’s Town Camp Enrichment Program is being suspended because of the COVID-19 pandemic, city officials announced Thursday.

The program provides indoor recreation to school-age youth from kindergarten through fifth grade. Outdoor youth programs, senior programs, library services and homeless services will still be provided, according to city officials.

According to Alameda County, 10,884 cases of the coronavirus have been reported in Oakland as of Thursday. City officials said the recent spike in virus cases and possibly a further increase because of family holiday gatherings were behind the decision to suspend the enrichment program.

“We realize that this will be a burden on some families,” city officials said. “However, we feel it is gravely necessary for us to play our part to control the spread of COVID-19, for both the customers we serve AND our own staff and their families.”

In-person enrichment programs were provided during the summer and at recreation centers since the beginning of the school year.


“We will continue following Alameda County Public Health guidelines and protocols over the next few weeks and will communicate when we feel we can safely resume indoor programming,” city officials said.

Head Start in Oakland remains open for in-person as well as virtual services but will have an extended winter break in anticipation of the increase in coronavirus cases.

Head Start locations will be closed from Dec. 21 through Jan. 8 and open again on Jan. 11. Families will be served virtually during the winter break.

Senior centers are not open for in-person services but are delivering food and making it available for pickup as well as providing virtual classes and information and referral services. More information can be found at https://www.oaklandca.gov/topics/senior-services.

Housing services for homeless residents remain in operation. Anyone interested in providing food or supplies to help homeless residents is encouraged to work with a provider of those services to reduce the risk of exposing homeless residents to the coronavirus.

Sidewalk library services continue to be provided at 16 locations during limited hours while indoor areas will stay closed to the public.

Library materials can be returned at outdoor bookdrops. The materials are quarantined for 96 hours before they are checked in.

Oakland Public Library reference librarians can be reached by calling (510) 238-3134 or by email at [email protected]

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Coronavirus live news: Iran passes 1m Covid-19 cases; WHO looks at possible ‘e-vaccination certificates’ for travel | World news

The information technology company said in a blog post published on Thursday that it had uncovered “a global phishing campaign” focused on organisations associated with the Covid-19 vaccine “cold chain” – the process needed to keep vaccine doses at extremely cold temperatures as they travel from manufacturers to people’s arms.

The US Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency reposted the report, warning members of Operation Warp Speed – the US government’s national vaccine mission – to be on the lookout.

Understanding how to build a secure cold chain is fundamental to distributing vaccines developed by the likes of Pfizer Inc and BioNTech SE because the shots need to be stored at minus 70 degrees Celsius (-94 F) or below to avoid spoiling.

IBM’s cybersecurity unit said it had detected an advanced group of hackers working to gather information about different aspects of the cold chain, using meticulously crafted booby-trapped emails sent in the name of an executive with Haier Biomedical, a Chinese cold chain provider that specializes in vaccine transport and biological sample storage.

The hackers went through “an exceptional amount of effort,” said IBM analyst Claire Zaboeva, who helped draft the report. Hackers researched the correct make, model, and pricing of various Haier refrigeration units, Zaboeva said.

“Whoever put together this campaign was intimately aware of whatever products were involved in the supply chain to deliver a vaccine for a global pandemic,” she said.

Haier Medical did not return messages seeking comment. Messages sent to the email addresses used by the hackers were not returned.

IBM said the bogus Haier emails were sent to around 10 different organizations but only identified one target by name: the European commission’s directorate-general for taxation and customs union, which handles tax and customs issues across the EU and has helped set rules on the import of vaccines.

Representatives for the directorate-general could not immediately be reached for comment.

IBM said other targets included companies involved in the manufacture of solar panels, which are used to power vaccine refrigerators in warm countries, and petrochemical products that could be used to derive dry ice.

Who is behind the vaccine supply chain espionage campaign isn’t clear. IBM’s Zaboeva said there was no shortage of potential suspects. Figuring out how to swiftly distribute an economy-saving vaccine “should be topping the lists of nation states across the world,” she said.

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Washington region braces for increase in virus cases after Thanksgiving travel

D.C. Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D) on Monday said she expects a rise in coronavirus cases in the coming weeks, underscoring concerns about holiday travel as leaders across the Washington region lobby the federal government for additional financial relief.

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The District reported 371 new coronavirus cases on Saturday, its highest total in a single day since the start of the pandemic. The city’s daily case rate per 100,000 people, calculated on a seven-day rolling basis, reached 27 in recent days — a number not seen since May.

While it could be weeks before the region sees the effect of Thanksgiving travel, Bowser on Monday pointed to a nationwide jump in cases that is still being felt in the nation’s capital. She reminded residents to adhere to city travel guidelines, which call on those who visit a “high risk” state to limit activities for 14 days when returning to the city. Residents and visitors can also get tested within three to five days of arriving and self-monitor for symptoms until receiving a negative test result.

[D.C. eases travel restrictions ahead of Thanksgiving while urging caution during holidays]

“We expect that we’re going to have more cases,” Bowser said. “We’re also in a good position to do a lot of testing. We have a very robust testing program, which we feel strongly will help us identify and isolate people who have been infected by covid.”

The seven-day average of new daily infections across the greater Washington region on Monday was 4,662, down slightly from a high of 4,989 recorded on Thanksgiving Day.

The region on Monday recorded 3,920 new cases and 20 deaths. Maryland added 1,923 cases and 16 deaths; Virginia had 1,893 ­cases and four deaths; and D.C. recorded 104 cases and no additional deaths.

Neil J. Sehgal, an assistant professor of health policy and management at the University of Maryland, said it could be weeks before spikes in cases are seen that stem from Thanksgiving travel. Health experts had long cautioned residents to avoid traveling over the traditionally busy period — and also to avoid in-home gatherings.

“With the public attitude we saw towards travel over Thanksgiving, it’s very hard to think we won’t see an impact,” Sehgal said. “Cases will undoubtedly increase in the D.C. region.”

Maryland health officials said Monday that a child died Sunday of the coronavirus, becoming the pandemic’s youngest victim in the state. Officials didn’t release the child’s age, saying only that the victim was 9 or younger. No other information was available about the child or the nature of the death.

As caseloads continue to jump, Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (R) on Monday wrote to President-elect Joe Biden’s transition team, saying the state’s top priority is another round of stimulus funding to help battle the virus.

[Coronavirus cases and metrics in D.C., Maryland and Virginia]

Hogan, who has advocated for more federal funding since spring, told the transition team that small businesses, as well as state and local governments, need money soon.

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There will ‘almost certainly’ be an uptick in COVID-19 cases after Thanksgiving travel

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious disease expert, said on Sunday that there will “almost certainly” be an uptick in coronavirus cases after Americans traveled for the Thanksgiving holiday despite public health officials’ warnings.



Anthony S. Fauci wearing a suit and tie talking on a cell phone: Fauci: There will 'almost certainly' be an uptick in COVID-19 cases after Thanksgiving travel


© Washington Examiner/Pool
Fauci: There will ‘almost certainly’ be an uptick in COVID-19 cases after Thanksgiving travel

“The travel that has been done has been done,” said Fauci on ABC’s “This Week.”

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“Having said that, we have to be careful now because there almost certainly is going to be an uptick because of what has happened with the travel,” Fauci said. “We understand the importance of families getting together. And it’s just something that we have to deal with that we likely will have an increase in cases, as we get into the colder weeks of the winter, and as we approach the Christmas season.”

Fauci urged travelers to be safe when returning home from holiday travels, encouraging them to quarantine if possible and to get tested.

Last Wednesday, the day before Thanksgiving, travel rates reached the highest they have been since March, with nearly 1.1 million passengers passing through airport security. A week before Thanksgiving, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued a recommendation against gathering for the holidays this year. Health experts have warned that the holidays could become a superspreader event if safety guidelines are not adhered to.

Fauci on Sunday also noted that a vaccine would likely be available for at-risk populations and health professionals around the middle or end of December, sympathizing with those who are feeling “Covid-fatigue,” but pleading with them to continue to adhere to safety guidelines.

Host Martha Raddatz asked Fauci if people should expect similar restrictions and recommendations for Christmas this year.

“I can’t see how we’re not gonna have the same thing because when you have the kind of infection that we have, it doesn’t all of a sudden turn around like that,” said Fauci. “So clearly in the next few weeks, we’re gonna have the same sort of thing and perhaps even two or three weeks down the line. Martha we may see a surge upon a surge.”

Fauci stated that he did not foresee “a relaxation” of the current Center for Disease Control (CDC) restrictions.

Fauci also responded to concerns around the vaccine and a potential pushback from anti-vaxxers.

“The process of the development of this vaccine has been one that has been scientifically sound. safety has not been compromised, scientific integrity has not been compromised and the process of determining whether it works, whether it’s safe and effective has been independent by independent bodies and transparent,” said Fauci. “We’ve got to get the community, the broad community of the United States to see that and appreciate that.”

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New Restrictions On Sports, Travel Amid Surge In Covid Cases And Hospitalizations

A record number of COVID cases and hospitalizations across Santa Clara County prompted health officials to sound the alarm on Saturday and announce new restrictions on sports, businesses and travelers.

The restrictions in Santa Clara County include a ban on contact sports like the San Francisco 49ers football team, quarantines for travelers outside the region, and reduced capacity inside businesses and facilities open to the public.

The new measures are in addition to the county’s purple tier designation and will be effective Monday through at least Dec. 21.

“We have come to a place where our cases and our hospitalizations are so high that we must do something to settle things down,” said Santa Clara County Health Officer Dr. Sara Cody at a Saturday press conference.

Cody and other officials urged residents to stay home whenever possible, wear masks and observe social distancing.


On Saturday, the county saw 760 new cases — shattering the previous record by 215, Cody said. There were also a record 239 COVID patients at hospitals, 71 of them in intensive care units.

Health officials expect virus-spreading Thanksgiving gatherings and flu season to add more patients and overwhelm hospitals by mid-December.

“This pandemic is like a high-speed train and our projections tell us we are on target to derail by the third week of December if we don’t apply brakes right now with all our collective might,” Cody said.

The county has seen 32,985 cases since the pandemic began, the highest in the greater Bay Area, and 476 deaths.

The county’s new restrictions limit capacity to 10 percent at businesses and facilities that are open to the public, except grocery stores and pharmacies, which are allowed 25 percent capacity, said County Counsel James Williams.

In addition, all facilities must establish a system to keep track of the number of people inside, such as posting an employee at the entrance.

First Amendment-protected gatherings, such as religious services or protests, are allowed outdoors with a maximum attendance of 100 people, Williams said.

Professional, collegiate and youth sports like football that involve physical contact or close proximity to persons outside one’s household, including all contact sports, are temporarily banned. People can continue to engage in outdoor athletics and recreation where social distancing can be maintained at all times.

Cardrooms are temporarily closed, and hotels and lodging facilities are only allowed to be open for essential travel and to use for isolation or quarantine.

Leisure and non-essential travel are strongly discouraged, and a new directive requires people to quarantine for 14 days upon return to the county from travel of more than 150 miles away. Healthcare workers traveling into the county to provide care or patients traveling into the county to obtain treatment will be exempted.

The new Santa Clara County restrictions are effective at 12:01 a.m. Monday.

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Mental health hospital suspends staff vacation due to COVID cases

A state-run psychiatric hospital in Rhode Island has suspended all medical staff vacation in response to a rising number of coronavirus cases among patients and workers.

“We regretfully are canceling all direct care patient support vacations” effective midnight Nov. 25, according to a letter to Eleanor Slater Hospital staff, The Providence Journal reported.

The letter also said, “We hope this vacation hold is temporary as we recognize the hard work and dedication of our staff and the need for time off.”

The letter was signed by Kathryn Power, director of the state Department of Behavioral Healthcare, Developmental Disabilities and Hospitals, which oversees the Cranston facility.

A Slater spokesperson earlier this week confirmed that 14 patients and 35 staffers had tested positive for the virus.

Another hospital group, Lifespan, previously issued an appeal for retired doctors and nurses to return to work, and even sought medical students and interns, to help relieve the medical staff shortage. Lifespan operates Rhode Island, Miriam, Hasbro Children’s and Newport hospitals.

There were 1,525 new confirmed cases of the coronavirus and 11 more virus-related fatalities in Rhode Island in the past two days, the state Department of Health reported Friday.

The department did not provide updated statistics on Thanksgiving Day, when most testing sites were closed because of the holiday.

The 7-day rolling average of daily new cases in Rhode Island has now risen over the past two weeks from more than 716 on Nov. 12 to almost 767 on Thursday, according to The COVID Tracking Project.

The 7-day rolling average of the positivity rate in Rhode Island was 5.89% on Thursday, down from over 6% two days prior, but still higher than it was two weeks ago.

State health departments are calculating positivity rate differently across the country, but for Rhode Island, the AP calculates the rate by dividing new cases by test encounters using data from The COVID Tracking Project.

The state’s death toll from the disease is now 1,346 patients.

The number of people in the state’s hospitals with the disease was down to 319 as of Wednesday, the latest day for which the data were available, the second consecutive day it has dropped. Of those, 37 are in intensive care.

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Public hospital suspends staff vacation due to virus cases

PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — A state-run psychiatric hospital in Rhode Island has suspended all medical staff vacation in response to a rising number of coronavirus cases among patients and workers.

“We regretfully are canceling all direct care patient support vacations” effective midnight Nov. 25, according to a letter to Eleanor Slater Hospital staff, The Providence Journal reported.

The letter also said, “We hope this vacation hold is temporary as we recognize the hard work and dedication of our staff and the need for time off.”

The letter was signed by Kathryn Power, director of the state Department of Behavioral Healthcare, Developmental Disabilities and Hospitals, which oversees the Cranston facility.

A Slater spokesperson earlier this week confirmed that 14 patients and 35 staffers had tested positive for the virus.

Another hospital group, Lifespan, previously issued an appeal for retired doctors and nurses to return to work, and even sought medical students and interns, to help relieve the medical staff shortage. Lifespan operates Rhode Island, Miriam, Hasbro Children’s and Newport hospitals.

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US number of cases 8 times bigger than reported, CDC says; AstraZeneca vaccine faces questions; WHO encourages exercise

Like pretty much everything in 2020, Thanksgiving looks a lot different due to COVID-19.

New COVID-19 vaccine candidate up to 90% effective and different from others

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Many are spending their first Thanksgiving alone or without loved ones. Families are turning video calls into the dinner table. Even the Thanksgiving Day Parade balloons are social distancing. 

“I know the country has grown weary of the fight,” President-elect Joe Biden said in a Thanksgiving eve address urging unity. “We need to remember we’re at war with the virus, not with one another. Not with each other.”

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Biden gave his address a day after the U.S. reported its deadliest day since May, with more than 2,000 new fatalities due to the virus. It could get worse: The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Wednesday published a national ensemble forecast that predicts 294,000 to 321,000 coronavirus deaths by Dec. 19.



a group of people performing on stage in front of a building: Masked handlers wait to raise and fly large balloons at the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade on November 26, 2020 in New York City. While the the annual holiday parade usually draws thousands of onlookers, much of the celebration was prerecorded and scaled back due to the continuing COVID-19 pandemic.


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Masked handlers wait to raise and fly large balloons at the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade on November 26, 2020 in New York City. While the the annual holiday parade usually draws thousands of onlookers, much of the celebration was prerecorded and scaled back due to the continuing COVID-19 pandemic.

In Los Angeles County, the nation’s most populous, public health officials said infections are skyrocketing, with approximately one out of every 145 people infected with the virus. That estimate was at 1 in 880 residents two months ago, according to the Los Angeles Times.

📈 Today’s numbers: The U.S. has reported more than 12.8 million cases and over 263,000 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University data. The global totals: 60.8 million cases and 1.42 million deaths.

🗺️ Mapping coronavirus: Track the U.S. outbreak in your state.

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Millions ignore travel warning as COVID-19 cases surge nationwide

With millions of Americans on the move Wednesday, health experts worry what is usually one of the country’s biggest nights for travel may also become one of its most dangerous. Despite the surge in new coronavirus cases, AAA expects up to 50 million Americans to travel.

More than 2.3 million people have been infected nationwide in the past two weeks, and more than 2,000 have died in the past 24 hours, according to figures from Johns Hopkins University. That’s the highest single-day death toll in more than six months.

Despite blunt warnings from public health officials pleading for people to stay home this Thanksgiving, millions are hitting the skies and roads anyway. 

Romeo Garcio left Maryland on Wednesday afternoon for his parents’ home in Greenville, North Carolina.

“The holidays are really the only times where I could be able to see my family,” he said.

When asked if he was worried at all about bringing the coronavirus home with him, Garcio replied, “Not at all. I’ve been tested. I’m negative.”

But that wasn’t enough for Tom Wilson. He made the agonizing decision not to spend Thanksgiving with his family.

“It just seemed like a risk that wasn’t worth taking,” Wilson said.

Meanwhile, there’s a growing patchwork of restrictions in cities and states that are intended to stop the virus’ spread. Fourteen states and Washington, D.C., call for mandatory testing or quarantine requirements for travelers. New York City police are setting up checkpoints at bridges and tunnels, and Maryland state troopers are checking if bars and restaurants are following the rules.

A stay-at-home advisory is now in place in Pennsylvania, and the state has ordered bars, restaurants and private catered events to stop alcohol sales for on-site consumption starting at 5 p.m. on Thanksgiving eve.

In Los Angeles County, dining at restaurants, breweries, wineries and bars will be restricted starting Wednesday. Beginning at 10 p.m., all eateries in the county will only be able to offer take-out, drive-thru and delivery services, CBS Los Angeles reports. 

From coast to coast, governors and mayors are practically begging people not to gather.

“Don’t make it harder on those frontline workers,” Minnesota Governor Tim Walz said. 

“To act like it’s a normal Thanksgiving is to deny reality,” New York Governor Andrew Cuomo stated.

Small gatherings are now a major driver of the virus spread. Fifteen members of a Texas family contracted COVID-19 at a birthday lunch.

“Please don’t be like my family and ignore the CDC guidelines,” one of the family members said in a video.

CBS News chief medical correspondent Dr. Jon LaPook has advice for people who have chosen to gather with friends and families.

“I think the safest thing is for people to assume they’re infected and infectious but they just don’t know it, even if they recently have tested negative,” he said.

Dr. LaPook added that masks should be worn during the gatherings, eating and socializing should be divided into separate areas, and windows and doors should be kept

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As airports are packed across the U.S., experts warn of ‘a surge’ of new cases after Thanksgiving

Despite warnings from public health officials not to travel for Thanksgiving, plenty of people are doing just that. Reports are piling in from airports across the country that describe large crowds. While most travelers wear masks, some photos clearly show people without face coverings.



a group of people standing around a bag of luggage: Travelers check in at Dulles International Airport in Dulles, Va., on Tuesday. (Photo: Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images)


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Travelers check in at Dulles International Airport in Dulles, Va., on Tuesday. (Photo: Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images)

Video shared on Twitter from Phoenix Sky Harbor Airport, in Arizona, shows a packed, standing-room-only airport as people wait at their gates to board flights.

At San Francisco International Airport, people can be seen crowded together in seats with plenty of others standing nearby as they wait to fly out.

In Des Moines, airport officials told the Des Moines Register that they expect a 50 percent increase in normal passenger traffic in the lead-up to Thanksgiving. And CBS Boston shared a video of Logan International Airport of long lines of people waiting to board flights and a packed check-in terminal. 

These reports come just days after the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention urged people not to travel for the holiday. “Travel may increase your chance of getting and spreading COVID-19,” the organization says online. “Postponing travel and staying home is the best way to protect yourself and others this year.” The CDC also urged would-be travelers to ask themselves serious questions such as whether you or someone in your household is at an increased risk of getting very sick from COVID-19, whether cases are increasing in your community, and whether hospitals in your area are overwhelmed with COVID-19 patients.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the country’s top infectious disease doctor, also warned this week about holiday travel, saying during an appearance on CBS’ Face the Nation that people who are flying for the holiday “are going to get us into even more trouble than we’re in right now.”

Doctors say this could lead to superspreader events across the country

“Airports have done a lot to try to become safer since the pandemic began, and we haven’t heard about airport-based outbreaks,” Dr. Amesh A. Adalja, senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security, tells Yahoo Life. But, he says, that was dependent on people following public health recommendations for preventing the spread of COVID-19, like physical distancing, wearing face masks as much as possible, and practicing good hand hygiene.

“Because Thanksgiving is a push for people to travel, most people who don’t adhere to protocols will be likely to be in airports,” Adalja says. “As a result, we will likely hear of more airport transmission.”

Dr. Richard Watkins, an infectious disease physician in Akron, Ohio,

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