Tag: BILL

Bill Algeo wants ‘d**khead’ Giga Chikadze after vacation sparring incident





Matt Erickson,John Morgan







Bill Algeo wants ‘d**khead’ Giga Chikadze after vacation sparring incident

LAS VEGAS – Bill Algeo beat Spike Carlyle with a unanimous decision Saturday on the main card at UFC on ESPN 18 in Las Vegas.



a man wearing a uniform: Bill Algeo


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Bill Algeo

Take a look inside the fight with Algeo, who got his first UFC win after short-notice loss to Ricardo Lamas in his promotional debut in August.

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Bill Gates Is Great, But Does Anyone Else Really Think Microsoft Teams And Zoom Will Replace Business Travel?

On Tuesday, Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates forecast that business travel will decline by 50%, even after the coronavirus crisis ends. He predicted a “very high threshold” for business trips as people work from home and use social media to meet.

“My prediction would be that over 50% of business travel and over 30% of days in the office will go away,” Gates told Andrew Ross Sorkin during The New York Times’ Dealbook conference.

In other news, my computer keeps asking me to sign in to Microsoft Teams – which, I just learned, can be integrated to work with Zoom.

Gates is a widely admired philanthropist and leader of the fight against coronavirus, but let’s acknowledge that his view of the airline industry could be Clouded by his pro-technology bias.

In the early 1990s, as video conferencing was gaining traction, my editors at The Miami Herald would try to get me to write stories about how this phenomenon would destroy the market for airline business travel. I ignored them. (Disclosure: At my next newspaper, I was fired for similar behavior.)

In 1990, the number of U.S. airline passengers totaled 466 million. In 2019 it reached 1.1 billion. In other words, video conferencing did not result in diminished air travel. Rather air travel more than doubled after it became popular.

Some industries, such as newspapers, have been decimated by the Internet. But so far the rise of technology has very clearly benefitted the airline industry. For instance, it enabled the dramatic growth of United’s San Francisco hub.

Today, airline industry leaders categorically reject the thought that the latest video technology will doom the industry.

“The first time someone loses a sale to a competitor who showed up in person is the last time they try to make a sales call on Zoom.” United Airlines CEO Scott Kirby said on the carrier’s third quarter earnings call in October.

On the Delta earnings call, CEO Ed Bastian answered an analyst’s question about pontification regarding business travel during the coronavirus crisis.

“Having been in this business for a long time, every crisis that I’ve been part of, and it’s been a lot of crises over that twenty-plus years, this was the first thing that people always talked about,” Bastian said, specifying: “the death of business travel and (how) technology was going to replace the need for travel.

“Every single time, business travel has come back stronger than anyone anticipated,” he said. “It will undoubtedly be different, but I think it’s going to come stronger than most of the pundits view.”

Bastian acknowledged that business travel could fall 10% to 20% for a few years before recovering.

It is important to remember that business travel did not just happen as a quirk in the system. It exists because businesses profit from it.

Additionally, many people enjoy it.  Today,

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Less than 10 per cent of travellers in NSW coronavirus hotel quarantine have paid their bill

Less than 10 per cent of guests in quarantine hotels in New South Wales have paid for the service since the State Government began charging for the program four months ago.

Documents obtained under freedom of information laws have also revealed 644 invoices are so overdue that debt recovery orders have been issued to recoup more than $2 million in outstanding fees.

Since July 18, overseas arrivals have been billed $3,000 each for the mandatory two-week stay in heavily guarded hotels.

Passengers flying to Sydney from Victoria since September 11 are also supposed to pay for their quarantine.

Since the NSW Government began charging, the documents show 43,684 returned travellers have been put up in hotels.

But just 4,156 have paid their invoices.

Catch up on the main COVID-19 news from November 19 with our coronavirus blog.

More than half of the arrivals had their fees waived, including almost 12,000 Defence Force personnel and passengers in transit.

The exemptions have cost the Government more than $30 million in lost revenue.

People who booked their flights before specified cut-off dates and those experiencing financial hardship can also apply for a waiver.

About 10 per cent of guests who owe money are on payment plans.

In a statement, a government spokesperson said hotel quarantine was essential in protecting the state against COVID-19.

“Quarantine fees are only a contribution to the overall cost incurred by the state and the NSW Government is not making a profit from the quarantine program,” they said.

“The fees for quarantine are comparable to other jurisdictions.”

Families and groups sharing hotel rooms are given a discount, with each extra adult charged $1,000 and children over the age of three costing $500 (meaning a family of two adults and two children must pay $5,000).

NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian has argued her state is doing more than any other jurisdiction to repatriate Australians, and has challenged Queensland and Western Australia in particular to step up.

A Senate estimates committee was recently told 32,000 stranded Australians have registered with the Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade to return home.

Price of quarantine hurting those without work

The cost of hotel quarantine and expensive international airfares make it hard for many to get back to Australia.

Natalie, who does not want to use her surname, was sailing from Mexico to Fiji with her partner when she heard Australia had shut its border.

The 31-year-old has returned to Sydney to find work after using all her travel budget.

“My money has run out and I’ve had to access early release of super,” Natalie said.

“I don’t have a job so I’ve got to make that money last.”

A man and woman on a paddle board
Natalie and her partner were sailing when they heard about Australia’s border closure.(Supplied)

The Federal Government scheme allows Australians affected by the pandemic to withdraw $10,000 from their superannuation account.

Natalie says she will use almost a third of that amount to pay for her quarantine when she is released from the hotel

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Bill Gates Predicts That 50% of Business Travel and 30% of Office Life Will Disappear in the Post-Covid-19 Era



Bill Gates et al. standing next to a man in a suit and tie


© Depositphotos.com


  • According to the founder of Microsoft, companies will begin to question much more the fact of taking a trip “just to discuss things.”
  • Business trips will be reduced by more than 50% and more than 30% of office life will disappear.

COVID-19 arrived and caused us to rethink the ways we work. The home office grew exponentially and business meetings turned into business video calls. It is no secret to anyone that the hybrid model is here to stay.

Against this background, Bill Gates predicted that in a post-SARS-CoV-2 era business travel will be reduced by more than 50% and more than 30% of office life will disappear. The businessman made these remarks at The New York Times DealBook conference.

  • You may be interested: Infographic: 8 steps to make a home office without lowering productivity



Bill Gates wearing a suit and tie


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Image: Depositphotos.com

According to the founder of Microsoft, companies will begin to question much more the fact of taking a trip “just to discuss things”, so it is likely that traveling for business will cease to be common.

“We will continue to go to the office and we will continue to do business trips, but much less,” said the billionaire. In October, his tech company announced to its employees that they could work from home permanently for at least 50% of their working hours.

  • Find out more: Microsoft tells employees they can work from home forever

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Bill Gates pronostica que el 50% de los viajes de negocios y 30% de la vida en oficina desaparecerán en la era post COVID-19

Bill Gates Predicts That 50% of Business Travel and 30% of Office Life Will Disappear in the Post-Covid-19 Era

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Bill Gates says in-person meetings aren’t the ‘gold standard’ anymore and that 50% of business travel will go away even after pandemic



Bill Gates wearing a suit and tie talking on a cell phone: Bill Gates. Hou Yu/China News Service/VCG via Getty Images


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Bill Gates. Hou Yu/China News Service/VCG via Getty Images

  • Bill Gates is predicting that business travel and office work won’t return to pre-pandemic levels in the future. 
  • “My prediction would be that over 50% of business travel and over 30% of days in the office will go away,” Gates said at The New York Times DealBook conference on Tuesday. 
  • In-person business meetings won’t be the “gold standard” anymore, Gates said, predicting that most companies will have a “very high threshold” for doing those types of business trips. 
  • Many major tech companies, particularly in the tech realm, are reconsidering the future of work. Some, like Twitter and Slack, have said employees may work remotely forever. Others, like Microsoft, after planning to implement hybrid models of work. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The sweeping changes we’ve seen this year to office work and business travel won’t go away, even after the pandemic subsides, according to Bill Gates. 

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Gates described how he envisions the future of work during an interview with Andrew Ross Sorkin at The New York Times DealBook conference on Tuesday. According to Gates, one of the biggest changes to how business is conducted will have to do with work-related travel. 

“My prediction would be that over 50% of business travel and over 30% of days in the office will go away,” Gates said.

The type of business travel where it’s important to fly somewhere to physically sit in front of someone else to discuss something in person won’t be the “gold standard” anymore, Gates said. He predicts most companies will have a “very high threshold” for doing those types of business trips. 

When it comes to working from home, “some companies will be extreme on one end or the other,” Gates said, likely alluding to companies like Twitter, who have said their employees may work remotely forever, from anywhere. 

Gates did reveal one downside of virtual meetings versus in-person events: the inability to meet new people. He told Sorkin that he hasn’t made new friends this year because he never meets people at random.

“More could be done on the software side to allow for serendipitous run-ins after meetings,” Gates said. 

Many companies, particularly those in the tech world, from which Gates hails, are reconsidering the future of work now the the pandemic has shut down the majority of travel and in-office work this year. Twitter isn’t the only company who has said employees never need to return to the office: Slack, Stripe, and Facebook have all said employees may relocate away from company headquarters, though in some cases, they’ll take pay cuts.

At Microsoft, the company Gates founded with Paul Allen in 1975, employees will shift to a “hybrid workplace” where they’ll only report to the office for half the workweek. 

Gates’ predictions on business travel line up with research from industry experts, who have estimated that it will likely take several years to return to pre-pandemic levels. According to

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Bill Gates predicts half of all business travel won’t return once COVID-19 is gone, report says

bill-gates-july-2020-cbs-evening-newws

Bill Gates: Companies will have a “very high threshold” for traveling to conduct in-person meetings.


Screenshot by CNET

Microsoft founder Bill Gates predicts that half of all business travel won’t return after the coronavirus pandemic ends and that people will also work far less often from a physical company office, Business Insider reported. Gates made the remarks Tuesday at The New York Times DealBook conference, BI said.

“My prediction would be that over 50% of business travel and over 30% of days in the office will go away,” Gates reportedly said, adding that from now on, businesses will have a “very high threshold” for traveling to conduct in-person meetings.

Microsoft has already announced a permanent work-from-home policy for eligible employees, who can also choose from a hybrid model where they spend some days in the office. Twitter, Facebook and other tech companies have announced similar policies. 

The Microsoft founder didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment.

It’s also possible many tech conferences could stay in their online format, rather than hosting tens of thousands of people at a brick and mortar convention center.

The information contained in this article is for educational and informational purposes only and is not intended as health or medical advice. Always consult a physician or other qualified health provider regarding any questions you may have about a medical condition or health objectives.

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Bill Gates Sees More Than 50% Of Business Travel Vanishing In Post-COVID World

KEY POINTS

  • We will go to office, do business travel, but dramatically less: Gates
  • Airlines in the U.S. are focusing on leisure travelers as business travel has collapsed
  • Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has pledged more than $350M to battle COVID-19

Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates said that the coronavirus has overhauled the way people travel for business and how workplaces function. The effects will last even after the pandemic is over, he added.

During The New York Times’ Dealbook conference, Gates said, “My prediction would be that over 50% of business travel and over 30% of days in the office will go away.”

With almost all companies enabling work from home for employees, Gates believes that there will be a “very high threshold” for business trips. “We will go to the office somewhat, we will do some business travel, but dramatically less,” he said.

Major tech companies including Microsoft, Facebook and Twitter have announced permanent work-from-home policies for their employees. Cloud company Dropbox has also implemented a flexible working-days policy through its “Virtual First” policy.

Talking during the virtual conference with Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla, Gates said he has already attended five virtual roundtable discussions with pharmaceutical executives this year, something that would have been an in-person affair in New York usually.

In a new podcast, “Bill Gates and Rashida Jones Ask Big Questions,” Gates said he was “embarrassed to admit” that he likes some parts of the work-from-home situation. He said he had “a much simpler schedule” now that he is not traveling for business, and he has not been to a physical office since March.

Gates’ comments are in line with the devastated airline industry across the world, especially hit by the absence of business travel. According to industry group Airlines for America, business travel accounted for 30% of the trips, but contributed more than half of U.S. airlines’ revenue.

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has been working during the pandemic to deliver the vaccine, when it becomes available, to those in need. The foundation has pledged more than $350 million in global support response to the COVID-19 pandemic. On Nov. 12, the company announced new commitments worth $70 million for global efforts to develop and distribute affordable and timely vaccines for low- and middle-income countries.

“Ending this pandemic will require the largest public health effort in history. It will have to be well-coordinated, well-funded, and global,” Mark Suzman, CEO of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, said in a statement.

Microsoft founder and philanthropist Bill Gates, seen here in October 2019, has been a top target of Russian-backed conspiracy theories, according to a US report Microsoft founder and philanthropist Bill Gates, seen here in October 2019, has been a top target of Russian-backed conspiracy theories, according to a US report Photo: AFP / JEFF PACHOUD

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Bill Gates says more than 50% of business travel will disappear in post-coronavirus world

  • Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates said Tuesday that he predicts over 50% of business travel and over 30% of days in the office will go away in the pandemic’s aftermath.
  • Moving forward, Gates predicted that there will be a “very high threshold” for conducting business trips and there will always be a way to work from home.



Bill Gates in glasses looking at the camera


© Provided by CNBC
Bill Gates

The coronavirus will fundamentally alter the way people travel for and conduct business, even after the pandemic is over, Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates said Tuesday.

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“My prediction would be that over 50% of business travel and over 30% of days in the office will go away,” Gates told Andrew Ross Sorkin during the New York Times’ Dealbook conference.

Moving forward, Gates predicted that there will be a “very high threshold” for conducting business trips now that working from home is more feasible. However, some companies may be more extreme with their efforts to reduce in-person meetings than others, he said.

Gates, whose foundation has been working to deliver a coronavirus vaccine to people most in need, said during a new podcast, “Bill Gates and Rashida Jones Ask Big Questions,” that he’s had a “simpler schedule” due to the pandemic now that he doesn’t travel for business.

The philanthropist and tech executive, who appeared alongside Pfizer CEO Albert Bourla during the livestreamed conference on Tuesday, said he’s already held five virtual roundtables this year with pharma executives — a meeting that’s usually held in person in New York.

“We will go to the office somewhat, we’ll do some business travel, but dramatically less,” Gates said.

The pandemic has devastated air travel demand, particularly for lucrative business trips. Business travelers before the virus accounted for half of U.S. airlines’ revenue, but just 30% of the trips, according to Airlines for America, an industry group that represents most U.S. carriers.

However, Microsoft executives have predicted that business trips will make a rebound, even as the company moves to make air travel more sustainable.

“We believe that as we return to the skies, the travel routes we’ve had … will resume at the level they had been before,” said Judson Althoff, executive vice president of Microsoft’s worldwide commercial business, said in October.

— CNBC’s Leslie Josephs contributed to this report.

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Bill Gates says 50% of all business travel will go away post-pandemic

  • Bill Gates is predicting that business travel and office work won’t return to pre-pandemic levels in the future. 
  • “My prediction would be that over 50% of business travel and over 30% of days in the office will go away,” Gates said at The New York Times DealBook conference on Tuesday. 
  • In-person business meetings won’t be the “gold standard” anymore, Gates said, predicting that most companies will have a “very high threshold” for doing those types of business trips. 
  • Many major tech companies, particularly in the tech realm, are reconsidering the future of work. Some, like Twitter and Slack, have said employees may work remotely forever. Others, like Microsoft, after planning to implement hybrid models of work. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The sweeping changes we’ve seen this year to office work and business travel won’t go away, even after the pandemic subsides, according to Bill Gates. 

Gates described how he envisions the future of work during an interview with Andrew Ross Sorkin at The New York Times DealBook conference on Tuesday. According to Gates, one of the biggest changes to how business is conducted will have to do with work-related travel. 

“My prediction would be that over 50% of business travel and over 30% of days in the office will go away,” Gates said.

The type of business travel where it’s important to fly somewhere to physically sit in front of someone else to discuss something in person won’t be the “gold standard” anymore, Gates said. He predicts most companies will have a “very high threshold” for doing those types of business trips. 

When it comes to working from home, “some companies will be extreme on one end or the other,” Gates said, likely alluding to companies like Twitter, who have said their employees may work remotely forever, from anywhere. 

Gates did reveal one downside of virtual meetings versus in-person events: the inability to meet new people. He told Sorkin that he hasn’t made new friends this year because he never meets people at random.

“More could be done on the software side to allow for serendipitous run-ins after meetings,” Gates said. 

Many companies, particularly those in the tech world, from which Gates hails, are reconsidering the future of work now the the pandemic has shut down the majority of travel and in-office work this year. Twitter isn’t the only company who has said employees never need to return to the office: Slack, Stripe, and Facebook have all said employees may relocate away from company headquarters, though in some cases, they’ll take pay cuts.

At Microsoft, the company Gates founded with Paul Allen in 1975, employees will shift to a “hybrid workplace” where they’ll only report to the office for half the workweek. 

Gates’ predictions on business travel line up with research from industry experts, who have estimated that it will likely take several years to return to pre-pandemic levels. According to Bank of America research from October, corporate travel is unlikely to rebound until “late 2023 or

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Brit, 25, faces four years in a Bali jail after fleeing a hotel bill



text: MailOnline logo


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A British tourist is facing four years in jail after refusing to pay an almost £200 hotel bill, claiming he had already settled it online.

Scott James Deakin, 25, ran up the 3.7million Indonesian rupiah bill (£197) at an unnamed hotel in Kuta on the island of Bali. 

He reportedly stayed at the hotel between July 21 and August 1, claiming to have booked the room through travel website Agoda but hotel staff said the payment had not gone through and that his card had expired.



text: British tourist Scott James Deakin, 25, is facing up to four years in a Balinese jail on fraud charges after fleeing an unpaid hotel bill


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British tourist Scott James Deakin, 25, is facing up to four years in a Balinese jail on fraud charges after fleeing an unpaid hotel bill

‘Then the suspect made another booking and the same thing occurred. The suspect insisted that his credit card was still valid and that he will sort it out with Agoda,’ Made Putra Yudistira, head of the crime investigation unit at Kuta sub-precinct, said.  

At this point, the holidaymaker promised to wire the money for the bill.  

Instead, Deakin vanished from the hotel on August 1, leaving his belongings behind.  

Last month, the hotel filed a criminal complaint, prompting police to track down and arrest the British tourist on Sunday. 

Deakin is now in police custody awaiting trial. If convicted of fraud, he could spend up to four years in prison. 

A post about Deakin’s arrest in a Facebook group called Bali Blacklist drew several comments from different users alleging that the Brit owed money to other hotels and restaurants and was even wanted for crashing and abandoning a rental car. 



a tree with a mountain in the background: The beautiful Indonesian island of Bali is a magnate for tourists from all over the world [File photo]


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The beautiful Indonesian island of Bali is a magnate for tourists from all over the world [File photo]


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