Tag: Ban

Italy to adopt travel ban within country during holiday season

The prime minister of Italy announced the country will enter an extended period of strict lockdowns to slow the spread of COVID-19.

Speaking to Italian citizens on Thursday evening, Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte said, “It’s clear this will be a Christmas that is different from others,” adding that officials in the country will ban travel through the nation over the holiday season.

The travel ban within the country’s 20 regions will begin on Dec. 21 and last through Jan. 6. The prime minister urged residents of the country to cancel holiday plans, arguing the precaution would help mitigate the spread of the coronavirus.

Conte made the announcement on the same day that Italian health officials recorded the highest number of total deaths in a day, 993 people, eclipsing March 27, when 919 died from complications arising from the disease.

Conte said that although the holiday season will be unlike any other, it would still be “no less authentic” than holidays past.

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The Trump travel ban on Muslim-majority countries may be associated with preterm births among women, study says

The 2017 travel ban imposed by the Trump administration on seven Muslim-majority countries may be associated with an increase in preterm births among women from those countries residing in the United States, according to a new study.



a group of people standing in front of a crowd: Researchers found an increase in preterm birth rates among women from countries on the 2017 travel ban.


© Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images
Researchers found an increase in preterm birth rates among women from countries on the 2017 travel ban.

The study, published last week in the journal Social Science and Medicine, analyzed preterm birth rates among women from countries impacted by the travel ban: Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen.

Researchers found an increase after the ban, with a preterm birth rate of 8.6% between February and September 2017. That percentage rose from 8.5% before the ban, between January 2009 and December 2016.

By comparison, US-born, non-Hispanic White women held a steady 8.6% preterm birth rate throughout the time frames.

The 0.1 percentage point increase may not seem dramatic, but it means that the odds of women from these countries having preterm births increased by 6.8%, according to lead author Goleen Samari, an assistant professor at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health.

“It’s a massive change when you think about a 6.8% increase,” Samurai told CNN. And because these women typically have better birth outcomes than non-Hispanic White women, Samari says, going from better to worse is significant.

Stress could be reason behind preterm births

To calculate the change, the team used a time series model to estimate the expected preterm birth numbers had the ban not been issued. They used data beginning in 2009 to see what the expected number of preterm births among women from the banned countries would be in 2017 and 2018, after the ban went into place. The team then compared the expected amount of preterm births to the actual amount, showing the elevated trend.

The researchers could not say why the policy led to a rise in preterm births. However, Samurai says that the researchers hypothesized that it was due to stress — either the initial acute stressful shock of the first order or chronic stress exposure as the ban continued to change and make headlines for its court filings or protests.

Another reason could be a decline of quality care, as some women may have avoided prenatal care because they may have felt like they were in a discriminatory environment, Samari says.

Researchers also noted some limitations in their analysis, notably that they did not use individual-level information in their analysis, like maternal facts, political ideology or gestational risk factors that may have contributed to preterm births.

The study stands out for its focus on women from the Middle East and North Africa, who tend to be overlooked as they are classified as non-Hispanic White in data, the researchers say. They add that no study had focused on the impact of a policy that is considered xenophobic and Islamophobic.

Preterm births and poor birth outcomes are “sensitive markers of temporally acute stressors from social and economic threats to

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The 2017 travel ban may be associated with preterm births among women from the targeted countries, study says

The study, published last week in the journal Social Science and Medicine, analyzed preterm birth rates among women from countries impacted by the travel ban: Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen.

Researchers found an increase after the ban, with a preterm birth rate of 8.6% between February and September 2017. That percentage rose from 8.5% before the ban, between January 2009 and December 2016.

By comparison, US-born, non-Hispanic White women held a steady 8.6% preterm birth rate throughout the time frames.

The 0.1 percentage point increase may not seem dramatic, but it means that the odds of women from these countries having preterm births increased by 6.8%, according to lead author Goleen Samari, an assistant professor at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health.

“It’s a massive change when you think about a 6.8% increase,” Samurai told CNN. And because these women typically have better birth outcomes than non-Hispanic White women, Samari says, going from better to worse is significant.

Stress could be reason behind preterm births

To calculate the change, the team used a time series model to estimate the expected preterm birth numbers had the ban not been issued. They used data beginning in 2009 to see what the expected number of preterm births among women from the banned countries would be in 2017 and 2018, after the ban went into place. The team then compared the expected amount of preterm births to the actual amount, showing the elevated trend.

The researchers could not say why the policy led to a rise in preterm births. However, Samurai says that the researchers hypothesized that it was due to stress — either the initial acute stressful shock of the first order or chronic stress exposure as the ban continued to change and make headlines for its court filings or protests.

States are calling racism a public health crisis. Here's what that means

Another reason could be a decline of quality care, as some women may have avoided prenatal care because they may have felt like they were in a discriminatory environment, Samari says.

Researchers also noted some limitations in their analysis, notably that they did not use individual-level information in their analysis, like maternal facts, political ideology or gestational risk factors that may have contributed to preterm births.

The study stands out for its focus on women from the Middle East and North Africa, who tend to be overlooked as they are classified as non-Hispanic White in data, the researchers say. They add that no study had focused on the impact of a policy that is considered xenophobic and Islamophobic.

Preterm births and poor birth outcomes are “sensitive markers of temporally acute stressors from social and economic threats to war, hate crimes, and socioplitical threats,” the researchers wrote in their analysis.

Other studies have pointed to similar findings. After September 11, women with Arabic names were 34% more likely to have a low birthweight infant than before the attacks, according to a 2006 study. Another study, published in 2018, found the passage of a restrictive immigration law in Arizona
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Italy announces Christmas travel ban



a person walking in the rain with an umbrella: A travel ban between different regions will be in place from 21 December to 6 January


© Getty Images
A travel ban between different regions will be in place from 21 December to 6 January

Italy has outlined strict coronavirus curbs for Christmas, including a ban on travel between different regions from 21 December to 6 January.

A curfew from 22:00 to 05:00 will also be in place.

Restaurants can open in some regions until 18:00 but only takeaways are allowed in other parts of the country. Ski slopes must close until 7 January.

It comes as Italy announced its highest daily Covid death toll since the pandemic started, with 993 fatalities.

“We cannot let down our guard,” Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte told a news conference.

“We must eliminate the risk of a third wave which could arrive in January – and not less serious than the first and the second,” he added.

There will be travel exceptions for work, medical reasons or emergencies.

On top of the regional travel bans, people will not be allowed to leave their home towns on Christmas Day, Boxing Day and New Year’s Day.

The new curbs have been criticised in a joint statement by regional authorities, who say they were not consulted by the central government.

“The lack of discussion has made it impossible to balance the curbs with the needs of families,” the statement said.

Attilio Fontana, governor of the northern Lombardy region, which has reported the most cases and deaths, called the new rules “crazy”.

More than 58,000 people have lost their lives to Covid-19 in Italy.

Before Thursday, the country’s previous record daily death toll was 969 on 27 March.

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The travel ban families hoping to be reunited



a group of people posing for the camera


© BBC


One of President Donald Trump’s earliest and most controversial moves was a travel ban on people from certain nations he said were deemed a security threat to the US. Joe Biden has promised this will be one of the first policies he reverses.

The ban – which now applies to 13 countries – has survived many legal challenges, but for some families it has meant years of separation.





© BBC


‘My child turned five yesterday. We have been apart his whole life.’

Afkab Hussein is a Somalian lorry driver who has never lived with his sons.

When he first moved to Ohio in 2015, Afkab Hussein planned for his pregnant wife to join him the following year.

But while his wife and children now live in Kenya, they are Somali citizens – and Somalia was one of the countries on the first iteration of the travel ban.

Since he moved, he has only been able to pay a couple of very short visits to his family – and missed the births of his two young children.

“It’s been a really tough few years. It’s been really hard,” he says. “I don’t think I’ll ever forget the last four years.”

Mr Hussein works long, lonely hours, driving lorries in 40 states across the country. He speaks to his wife on the phone, but an eight-hour time difference means that for large stretches of his day, his family is fast asleep.

He has missed all of the major milestones in his sons’ lives so far: “Yesterday was my first son’s fifth birthday – and I wasn’t there.”

Mr Hussein knew that during his campaign Mr Biden had promised to lift the ban in his first 100 days, and was hopeful.

Ally Bolour, a lawyer with American Visas in California, says he is optimistic these families will be able to meet again, but argues that even before the travel ban young Muslim men like Mr Hussein faced discrimination in the US visa system.

“Before Trump, even during [the term of former president Barack] Obama,” this was an issue, Mr Bolour says.

“Even people who go for consular processing for émigré visas can be subjected to sometimes years-long background checks if they’re Muslim, if they’re male, between certain ages and from certain countries.

“What Donald Trump did was effectively… what the government was doing already, but in the form of a travel ban.”

Some argue that the ban is an effective counter-terrorism measure, but caught up in the visa refusals are also families who just want to be together.





© BBC


‘I would never have had a kid if I had known’

Mina Mahdavi from Campbell, California, has a mother in Iran who has never been able to visit her grandson.

Pregnant with her first child in 2016, Mina Mahdavi applied for a tourist visa so her mother could visit from Iran. She really needed her mother’s support getting ready for the baby.

One month later Donald Trump took office and in

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Joe Biden Has Promised to End Trump’s Muslim and African ‘Travel Ban’. But Its Legacy Will Be Felt for Years

Afnan Salem’s father, a Somali citizen living in Malaysia, has been waiting three years for United States immigration authorities to allow him to come to Ohio to live with his family. But Trump’s severe travel restrictions on many visas for those with citizenship from more than a dozen predominantly African and Muslim-majority countries, including Somalia, means he is, at least temporarily, barred from entry.



a group of people posing for the camera: Demonstrators protest President Donald Trump's executive immigration ban at O'Hare International Airport on January 29, 2017 in Chicago, Illinois.


© Joshua Lott—AFP via Getty Images
Demonstrators protest President Donald Trump’s executive immigration ban at O’Hare International Airport on January 29, 2017 in Chicago, Illinois.

Under previous Administrations, Salem’s father would likely have been able to come to the U.S. without complications: Salem’s brother is a U.S. citizen and has filed for a visa on their father’s behalf. Trump’s travel ban—often referred to as the Muslim and African ban—changed that calculus, making it much more difficult, and often impossible, for family members from certain predominately Muslim and African countries to gain entry to the U.S.

Salem, a Somali-American 22-year-old student at Ohio State University, says the stringent restrictions send a message to her and those like her that Africans and Muslims are not welcome in the U.S, that “you don’t have the right to be reunited with your family because of your faith or where you come from.”

President-elect Joe Biden, who is expected to be inaugurated on Jan. 20, 2021, has promised to revoke the Trump-era travel ban on his first day in office—a commitment that families like Salem’s are desperately hoping he follows through on.

Read more: Biden Has Promised to Undo Trump’s Immigration Policies. How Much Is He Really Likely to Reform?

Even before President Donald Trump issued his first executive order attempting to establish a ban just about a week after his inauguration, he had called on the campaign trail for a “total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States,” and falsely declared that “Islam hates us.” It was in this context that Trump began issuing executive orders to keep many Muslims from entering the U.S. (The first was introduced January 2017.) The first few early iterations of a travel ban were struck down by lower courts, but the Supreme Court upheld a recent version in 2018.

The impact of the travel restrictions has been far-reaching. Between Oct. 1, 2015 and Sept. 30, 2019 there was a decrease of 79% in visa issued to Iranians, 74% for Somalians and 66% for Yemenis, according to The Bridge Initiative, a research project based in Georgetown University that focuses on Islamophobia. In Jan. 2019, the libertarian Cato Institute reported that the new restrictions had already prevented more than 15,000 spouses and adopted children of U.S. citizens from joining their spouses or parents in the U.S. In Michigan, a Yemeni-American father and U.S. citizen Mahmood Salem committed suicide after his wife and two of his five children in Djibouti were denied visas under Trump’s travel ban to join him in the U.S., NBC reported.

“Each time the Muslim ban was reintroduced, it carried

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UEFA preparing to move Liverpool Champions League tie to Dortmund amid UK-Denmark travel ban, sources say

liverpool-mohamed-salah.jpg
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Jurgen Klopp’s former home ground stands ready to host Liverpool’s Champions League group game against Midtjylland with UEFA planning to move the game away from Denmark.

Borussia Dortmund’s Westfalenstadion has been earmarked to host the match on December 9, a source at the city government confirmed to CBS Sports. A final decision has not yet been taken and will depend on any further COVID-19 regulations put in place by the German government.

The match was initially due to take place at Midtylland’s home ground, the MCH Arena, but UEFA are prepared to move the tie unless there is a change to the British government’s travel policy for Denmark.

Currently the British government does not allow passenger planes between the United Kingdom and Denmark after a mutated strain of coronavirus was found in mink in the country. A temporary travel corridor was created to allow the Icelandic football team to play England in a UEFA Nations League match at Wembley earlier this month after a fixture in Copenhagen but that option is not currently available to Liverpool.

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Any individuals travelling from Denmark to the United Kingdom are obliged to isolate for 14 days, a period in which Liverpool play three further games.

Though it would be in curious circumstances a trip to his former home would surely be a welcome surprise for Klopp, who managed the club for seven years and won two Bundesliga titles. Reports suggest Midtjylland still would prefer to host the tie. UEFA declined to comment when contacted by CBS Sports but confirmed that no decision had yet been made.

Liverpool currently sit top of Group D despite a 2-0 defeat to Atalanta at Anfield yesterday. Midtjylland are yet to gain a point from their four games and their home match against the Reds will be their final European match of the season.

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England adds Estonia, Latvia to quarantine list, lifts travel ban on Denmark

LONDON (Reuters) – England added Estonia and Latvia to its traveller quarantine list, meaning that from Nov. 28 people arriving from those two countries will be required to self-isolate for 14 days, Transport Secretary Grant Shapps said on Thursday.



graphical user interface, website: FILE PHOTO: Passengers wearing protective masks walk with their luggage at Gatwick Airport, in Gatwick


© Reuters/Toby Melville
FILE PHOTO: Passengers wearing protective masks walk with their luggage at Gatwick Airport, in Gatwick

Shapps also said that a total travel ban on Denmark, announced on Nov. 7 in response to concerns over outbreaks of coronavirus on Danish mink farms, would be lifted on Nov. 28. However, Denmark will remain on the quarantine list.

The minister said Bhutan, Timor-Leste, Mongolia, Aruba and several Pacific island nations had been added to the safe travel list, meaning that people arriving from those countries from Nov. 28 will no longer need to self-isolate.

A new quarantine regime is due to come into force on Dec. 15. From that date, people arriving from quarantine list countries will have to self-isolate for five days, at which point they will have the option to take a COVID test. If the result is negative, they will be released from self-isolation.

(Reporting by William Schomberg and Estelle Shirbon)

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The US is reportedly close to lifting its 8-month travel ban for Europe, now that its own COVID-19 outbreak is far worse



a group of people performing on a counter: Travelers walk through a nearly empty terminal at Boston's Logan Airport on November 20. AP Photo/Michael Dwyer


© AP Photo/Michael Dwyer
Travelers walk through a nearly empty terminal at Boston’s Logan Airport on November 20. AP Photo/Michael Dwyer

  • The White House is considering lifting the travel ban on non-US citizens coming from Europe and Brazil, Reuters reported.
  • President Trump has not made up his mind yet, but the plan is supported by members of the White House coronavirus task force and other agencies, according to Reuters.
  • The US barred entry to travellers from Europe in March as the outbreak surged there, but the US outbreak has now spent months as the world’s worst-affected country.
  • Currently, non-US residents who have been in European nations or Brazil in the previous 14 days can’t enter the US, though some travellers are considered exceptions.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The White House is considering lifting its travel ban on inbound travel to the US from Europe and Brazil, Reuters reported early Wednesday.

It comes as the US’s coronavirus outbreak continues to be the worst in the world.

Reuters cited five US and airline officials saying that an end to the ban was close.

It reported that the plan is supported by members of the White House’s coronavirus task force and other federal agencies.

But it said that President Donald Trump has not yet decided whether he supports it. There is currently no date for when an easing may take place.

The US banned travellers from Europe in March in an effort to stop the spread of COVID-19, and added Brazil in May.

But the US outbreak has spiralled since, and the US has now spent months as the country with the highest number of virus cases and deaths in the world.

Not long after the US put its ban in place, much of Europe likewise banned entry from the US.

Video: 2019: Trump signs executive order to overhaul organ transplant and kidney dialysis (The Washington Post)

2019: Trump signs executive order to overhaul organ transplant and kidney dialysis

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More than 12.5 million people in the US have now been infected by the coronavirus, and more than 259,000 people have died from it. The US is currently in the middle of a third surge, with its cases at an all-time high.

Europe’s cases rose rapidly in the last few months after the virus was brought under control over the summer. But the continent’s cases have started falling after countries implemented lockdowns and new restrictions.

Here’s how the US’s outbreak looks:



chart, histogram: The US's new daily coronavirus cases as of November 24. Worldometer


© Worldometer
The US’s new daily coronavirus cases as of November 24. Worldometer


 

And here’s the outbreak across Europe, where cases have started falling again:



The number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 across the EU/EEA and the UK, as of November 25. ECDC


© ECDC
The number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 across the EU/EEA and the UK, as of November 25. ECDC

The lower infection rate in Europe may prompt Trump to decide against lifting the ban, Reuters reported.

Currently, non-US residents who have been in the European countries or Brazil over the last 14 days can’t enter, though there are

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White House close to lifting Europe COVID-19 travel ban: Reuters

  • The White House is considering lifting the travel ban on non-US citizens coming from Europe and Brazil, Reuters reported.
  • President Trump has not made up his mind yet, but the plan is supported by members of the White House coronavirus task force and other agencies, according to Reuters.
  • The US barred entry to travellers from Europe in March as the outbreak surged there, but the US outbreak has now spent months as the world’s worst-affected country.
  • Currently, non-US residents who have been in European nations or Brazil in the previous 14 days can’t enter the US, though some travellers are considered exceptions.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The White House is considering lifting its travel ban on inbound travel to the US from Europe and Brazil, Reuters reported early Wednesday.

It comes as the US’s coronavirus outbreak continues to be the worst in the world.

Reuters cited five US and airline officials saying that an end to the ban was close.

It reported that the plan is supported by members of the White House’s coronavirus task force and other federal agencies.

But it said that President Donald Trump has not yet decided whether he supports it. There is currently no date for when an easing may take place.

The US banned travellers from Europe in March in an effort to stop the spread of COVID-19, and added Brazil in May.

But the US outbreak has spiralled since, and the US has now spent months as the country with the highest number of virus cases and deaths in the world.

Not long after the US put its ban in place, much of Europe likewise banned entry from the US.

More than 12.5 million people in the US have now been infected by the coronavirus, and more than 259,000 people have died from it. The US is currently in the middle of a third surge, with its cases at an all-time high.

Europe’s cases rose rapidly in the last few months after the virus was brought under control over the summer. But the continent’s cases have started falling after countries implemented lockdowns and new restrictions.

Here’s how the US’s outbreak looks:

Worldometer

The US’s new daily coronavirus cases as of November 24.

Worldometer


 

And here’s the outbreak across Europe, where cases have started falling again:

Europe infections

The number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 across the EU/EEA and the UK, as of November 25.

ECDC


The lower infection rate in Europe may prompt Trump to decide against lifting the ban, Reuters reported.

Currently, non-US residents who have been in the European countries or Brazil over the last 14 days can’t enter, though there are some travellers that are considered exceptions.

Reuters reported that many officials say the ban on Europe and Brazil doesn’t make sense because travellers from other countries with similarly severe outbreaks are not banned from coming to the US.

The White House, Department of Homeland Security and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) did not comment to

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