Tag: Austin

Austin mayor regrets vacation to Mexico where he filmed video instructing residents that they ‘need to stay home’

The mayor of Austin, Texas, said Wednesday that he regretted going on vacation last month to Cabo San Lucas, Mexico, where he filmed a Facebook video instructing residents that they “need to stay home.”



Steve Adler wearing a suit and tie: Austin mayor regrets vacation to Mexico where he filmed video instructing residents that they 'need to stay home'


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Austin mayor regrets vacation to Mexico where he filmed video instructing residents that they ‘need to stay home’

Austin Mayor Steve Adler (D) told The Hill in a statement that he regretted the trip after the Austin American-Statesman reported it on Wednesday.

“I regret this travel,” he said. “I wouldn’t travel now, didn’t over Thanksgiving and won’t over Christmas.”

“But my fear is that this travel, even having happened during a safer period, could be used by some as justification for risky behavior,” Adler said. “In hindsight, and even though it violated no order, it set a bad example for which I apologize.”

Adler reportedly took a private jet with seven other individuals to visit a family timeshare for a week in Cabo after holding an outdoor wedding and reception for his daughter in Austin.

A day after arriving, Adler addressed the city in a Facebook video, requesting residents stay home, according to the Statesman. In the video, he did not reveal that he was outside of the city and country.

“We need to stay home, if you can,” he said in the video at the time. “Do everything you can to try to keep the numbers down. This is not the time to relax. We are going to be looking really closely.”

“We may have to close things down if we are not careful,” Adler added.

The mayor defended his daughter’s wedding and travel to the newspaper, saying that neither broke his city coronavirus orders or Texas state orders.

The Statesman reported that at the time of the wedding comprising of 20 guests and vacation, Austin officials recommended limiting groups to no more than 10 people, that only at-risk people avoid non-essential trips.

“There was no recommendation for people not to travel during that period of time,” he told the Statesman. “Someone could look at me and say, ‘He traveled.’ But what they could not say is that I traveled at a time when I was telling other people not to travel.”

Adler said his family spent hours planning a safe wedding and vacation, and he discussed the matter with interim health director Mark Escott. At the wedding, the 20 guests took a rapid COVID-19 test and socially distanced, and masks were handed out but “probably not” worn the whole time, he told the newspaper.

When the mayor left for Mexico, the positivity rate was less than 4 percent in Austin, but increased while he was away. Mexico is one of the few countries that continues to allow Americans to enter as others have banned U.S. tourists amid the pandemic.

The week following his vacation, Austin officials raised the city to a Stage 4, which recommends residents avoid all nonessential travel.

News about Adler’s trip comes as people have increasingly

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Austin mayor urged people to ‘stay home’ from a timeshare in Cabo San Lucas, where he flew in on a private jet for a vacation with eight others, according to report



Steve Adler wearing a blue shirt: Steve Adler, Mayor of Austin, speaks during the American Cities Climate Challenge conference at the C40 World Mayors Summit on October 10, 2019 in Copenhagen, Denmark. Ole Jensen/Getty Images


© Ole Jensen/Getty Images
Steve Adler, Mayor of Austin, speaks during the American Cities Climate Challenge conference at the C40 World Mayors Summit on October 10, 2019 in Copenhagen, Denmark. Ole Jensen/Getty Images

  • The mayor of Austin, Texas, took a trip to Cabo San Lucas in Mexico on a private jet just before urging constituents to stay home as COVID-19 cases rose in the city, according to the Austin Statesman and KVUE.
  • Steve Adler also hosted a wedding for his daughter the day before the November flight, according to Tony Plohetski, the local reporter who broke the story. Twenty people attended the event.
  • Adler delivered a video address to constituents telling them to “stay home” and avoid unnecessary travel, though he did not disclose that he was doing so from Cabo.
  • “It’s not perfect,” Adler said during an interview this week, according to KVUE. “Obviously there are infections that could happen. But what we did was stay compliant with the rules.”
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The mayor of Austin, Texas, urged his constituents to “stay home” on a video call from a timeshare in Cabo San Lucas last month where he traveled on a private jet with eight family members and guests, according to the Austin Statesman and KVUE.

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“Stay home if you can … this is not the time to relax,” said Steve Adler in the video, which was shared Facebook on November 9. 

Adler kept the jaunt under wraps until local journalist Tony Plohetski broke the story Wednesday afternoon. The Democrat then confirmed the trip to Mexico and said he also hosted a wedding for his daughter the day before flying out for his vacation. Plohetski reported that 20 people attended the celebration.

According to Adler, neither his trip nor the wedding violated any of his own orders or Texas’ COVID-19 restrictions.

“It’s not perfect,” Adler said during an interview this week, according to the local ABC affiliate, KVUE. “Obviously there are infections that could happen. But what we did was stay compliant with the rules.”

In his video address, the mayor gave no indication he was out of town.

He also noted some constituents “seem to be a little reticent” when reached by the city’s contact tracers.

As for the wedding, Adler said in a statement that he consulted with health officials “and worked hard to model the kind of behavior I’ve asked of the community.”

“We ask everyone to be as safe as possible in what they do,” he continued in the statement. “My family and I are no exception and we’ll continue to do as I ask of our community. During Thanksgiving and as anticipated for Christmas and the New Year, we should all be especially mindful.” 

As of Wednesday, more than 13.8 million Americans have tested positive for coronavirus and over 272,400 have died, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University. Texas, the second worst-hit state in the US, has surpassed 1.25 million cases and 22,100 deaths.

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Driskill hotel chef returns after stroke to light Christmas tree – News – Austin American-Statesman

For the first time in more than eight months, Nelson Toala returned to the Driskill Hotel the place he has worked as a chef for more than a decade.

Except in lieu of his chef’s uniform, Toala, 65, wore jeans, a long sleeve gray shirt, a hat and was accompanied by his wife Maria and a designated cane. The couple were honored guests Monday, as they helped continue the tradition of lighting the hotel’s Christmas tree.

The Toala family is part of the Statesman’s Season for Caring program, which helps hundreds of families each year through local nonprofit agencies. The Toala family was nominated by Meals on Wheels Central Texas.

Since 2015, the Driskill has welcomed Season For Caring families to be part of this tradition, which also includes dinner and a one-night stay, typically in the Cattle Baron suite. The Driskill also has hosted the Cookies for Caring event each year, which raises money for Season for Caring.

Amid the coronavirus pandemic, the hotel’s annual traditions look a little different this year. The virtual tree lighting event, which normally floods the downstairs lobby with people, is virtual, and guests and supporters will only be able to tune in online.

Cookies for Caring, which sells tins of cookies prepared by local bakeries, restaurants and hotel restaurants, will continue this year, but instead of having an event to pick up cookies, the cookies will be prepackaged in tins.

This year cookies from the Driskill, Hyatt Regency Austin, Hyatt Regency Lost Pines and Miravel Austin will fill the tins. Tins are available at driskillhotel.com for $50 and can be picked up in the hotel lobby 4-6 p.m. Dec. 17-19.

Since 2015 that event has raised $40,000 for Season for Caring.

To keep the spirit of the tree lighting tradition alive, a small group of hotel staff, Meals on Wheels staff and fellow employees joined the celebration when Toala would flip the switch.

Monday’s tree lighting was prerecorded and streamed on the Driskill’s Facebook page at 6 p.m. Tuesday.

Toala has been absent from his chef job since March.

When the coronavirus pandemic hit, he was temporarily furloughed from his job, but before he could return to the kitchen he had a stroke leaving him with partial paralysis on his right side, making it difficult to walk on his own, shower or cook.

He is the primary caregiver for Maria, and now his two granddaughters Alexssandra, 10, and Isabela, 8, who live with them.

For months, Nelson Toala has been struggling to be able to provide for his family, but with the help of local organizations, like Meals on Wheels, and the love of the staff at the Driskill, they have been able to get by, Toala says.

Since May, Meals on Wheels has been able to provide the family with meals each week and also connected them with resources that have helped with mortgage and utility assistance, and other needs.

While Toala said he was humbled by the help he has received

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New cardinals quarantine in pope’s hotel ahead of ceremony – News – Austin American-Statesman

ROME (AP) ” The Vatican’s Santa Marta hotel was built to sequester cardinals during papal elections. It’s now sequestering soon-to-be cardinals in town for this weekend’s ceremony to get their red hats: A handful are in protective coronavirus quarantine, confined to their rooms on Vatican orders and getting meals delivered to their doors.

The 10-day quarantines, with COVID-19 tests administered at the start and finish, are just one example of how Saturday’s ceremony to elevate new cardinals is like nothing the Holy See has ever seen.

‘They told me it would be like this but I didn’t think it would be so strict!’ marveled Cardinal-designate Felipe Arizmendi Esquivel, the retired archbishop of Chiapas, Mexico.

During a Zoom call with The Associated Press from his hotel room, Esquivel said he had thought there might be some exceptions to the lockdown for new cardinals. ‘No! Here, it doesn’t matter if you’re a cardinal or a pope. The virus doesn’t respect anyone,’ he said.

Pope Francis on Saturday will elevate 13 clerics to the College of Cardinals, the elite group of red-robed churchmen whose primary task is to elect a new pope. It’s the seventh time Francis has named a new batch of cardinals since his election in 2013, and his imprint is increasingly shifting the balance of power away from Europe and toward the developing world.

The Vatican has said two new cardinals won’t make it to Rome for the ceremony, known as a consistory, because of COVID-19 and travel concerns: The Vatican’s ambassador to Brunei, Cardinal-designate Cornelius Sim, and the archbishop of Capiz, Philippines, Cardinal-designate Jose Advincula.

The Vatican is arranging for them, and any of the cardinals who might not make it, to participate in the ceremony remotely from their homes. They’ll get their three-pointed ‘biretta’ hats from a Vatican ambassador or another envoy.

For those who are participating in person, the public health crisis has posed an unusual set of challenges. Italy, where the pandemic erupted in late February, is currently in the throes of a second wave. The Vatican itself has returned to a modified lockdown in recent weeks, with the Vatican Museums shuttered and a dozen Swiss Guards testing positive.

Francis, 83, has been criticized for his rather lax mask usage, but he has abided by social distancing measures to a degree. He too lives at Santa Marta, where there has been at least one positive case reported in recent months.

Usually, consistories are full of parties and crowds: Cardinals come to town with family, friends and sometimes benefactors and parishioners who get to see the new ‘princes of the church’ up close and then attend receptions and dinners in their honor. Under normal circumstances, the consistory would be followed by ‘courtesy visits,’ where the new cardinals greet well-wishers and the general public from the grandeur of their own reception rooms in the Apostolic Palace or Vatican auditorium.

This year, there will be no courtesy visits, and each cardinal has a 10-person limit for guests. For Esquivel,

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Nelson Toala: Stroke, pandemic changed life for Driskill Hotel cook – News – Austin American-Statesman

Up until about six months ago, Nelson Toala was the primary provider for his wife and two granddaughters.

He has worked as a cook at the Driskill Hotel in downtown Austin for more than a decade, but when the coronavirus pandemic hit, he was temporarily furloughed. He was hoping to return back to the kitchen, but before he got the chance, he had a stroke that left him with partial paralysis on his right side. He is unable to walk or shower on his own and his speech is not as clear.

“We were sent home from work on March 17, and since then I have had a difficult time,” Toala says. “I am head of household. I recently turned 65, and without the income, it has been difficult to maintain bills and cope with my financial responsibility.”

The change is something that is unfamiliar to Toala.

He was born and raised in Ecuador. As the son of a farmer, he grew up working on the farm before going off to college to become a pharmacist. He soon would be married and become a father of three. He has always worked to provide for his family, he says.

In 2006, when he moved from Manta, Ecuador, to Austin with his wife, Maria, 65, he says although things were challenging he did not let that stop him from doing what was expected of him — providing for his family.

“At the very beginning there were a lot of difficulties because of my age, language and culture and economic barriers,” Toala says. “That was challenging for me, but we found good programs, and the people in Austin are so giving.”

He says he started taking classes so he could learn English, and Goodwill was able to help him find a job and go back to school, but he wasn’t sure what was next for him. His pharmacist license from Ecuador would not carry over in Austin. He had to start all over.

Toala first worked at Bealls, but he needed to make more money to keep up with expenses, so he got a second job working at the Marriott. He says everyone in the hotel kitchen seemed to be in culinary school, and so he thought culinary school would be the logical next step for him as well.

While working two jobs, Toala attended part-time classes at Austin Community College’s culinary program and graduated in early 2011, about three years after taking his first culinary course.

“The language barrier was difficult, but my passion to redesign my career helped get me through it,” he says. “It took me three years because I worked two jobs, was going to school and had family responsibilities. But I did it.”

He says while he was in culinary school, Bealls had closed, and so he started applying for another second job. He would eventually land at the Driskill, working his way from a part-time breakfast line cook to banquets. In the last 14 years, he has

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Renaissance Austin Hotel sells for $70 million



a car parked on the side of a building: A Renaissance Austin Hotel employee greets an arriving customer in this photo from 2016. The hotel at 9721 Arboretum Blvd. has been sold to a California investment firm for $70 million.  [AMERICAN-STATESMAN FILE]


© Provided by Austin American-Statesman
A Renaissance Austin Hotel employee greets an arriving customer in this photo from 2016. The hotel at 9721 Arboretum Blvd. has been sold to a California investment firm for $70 million. [AMERICAN-STATESMAN FILE]

A San Francisco–based investment firm has purchased the Renaissance Austin Hotel, agreeing to pay $70 million for the 492-room hotel in the Arboretum retail development.

The Axton Group is purchasing the hotel from Florida-based Xenia Hotels & Resorts, the companies said Tuesday.

Xenia had agreed in February to sell the Renaissance Austin Hotel for $100 million to an unnamed buyer. However, Xenia announced in April that it had terminated the planned sale, as the coronavirus pandemic impacted the U.S. hotel industry.

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Located at 9721 Arboretum Blvd., the Renaissance Austin Hotel is a 457,000 square foot property on 9.7 acres, according to the Travis Central Appraisal District. Its appraised value is $93.3 million, according to the appraisal district’s 2020 figures.

The hotel includes 88 suites and 77,600 square feet of indoor and outdoor meeting and event facilities, according to the Axton Group. The firm said it plans a number of renovations to the property, including a redesign of the entrance and lobby and renovations to meeting and banquet facilities.

The Axton Group “is actively evaluating opportunistic investments across the U.S. from sellers seeking liquidity,” the firm said in a news release announcing the acquisition.

“This investment is representative of the cyclical nature of hotel assets, which have been even more acutely impacted in this current environment than previous economic cycles given the dynamics of the pandemic,” Peter Oberndorf, founder and CEO of Axton, said in a written statement. “It is now our responsibility to reposition and enhance this property, guiding it on a path of recovery and ultimately leaving it in a better place than we entered. We look forward to making this vision a reality.”

The hotel will retain the Renaissance brand and continue to be managed by Marriott, the Axton Group said.

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Renaissance Austin Hotel sells for $70 million – Business – Austin American-Statesman

A San Francisco–based investment firm has purchased the Renaissance Austin Hotel, agreeing to pay $70 million for the 492-room hotel in the Arboretum retail development.

The Axton Group is purchasing the hotel from Florida-based Xenia Hotels & Resorts, the companies said Tuesday.

Xenia had agreed in February to sell the Renaissance Austin Hotel for $100 million to an unnamed buyer. However, Xenia announced in April that it had terminated the planned sale, as the coronavirus pandemic impacted the U.S. hotel industry.

Located at 9721 Arboretum Blvd., the Renaissance Austin Hotel is a 457,000 square foot property on 9.7 acres, according to the Travis Central Appraisal District. Its appraised value is $93.3 million, according to the appraisal district’s 2020 figures.

The hotel includes 88 suites and 77,600 square feet of indoor and outdoor meeting and event facilities, according to the Axton Group. The firm said it plans a number of renovations to the property, including a redesign of the entrance and lobby and renovations to meeting and banquet facilities.

The Axton Group “is actively evaluating opportunistic investments across the U.S. from sellers seeking liquidity,” the firm said in a news release announcing the acquisition.

“This investment is representative of the cyclical nature of hotel assets, which have been even more acutely impacted in this current environment than previous economic cycles given the dynamics of the pandemic,” Peter Oberndorf, founder and CEO of Axton, said in a written statement. “It is now our responsibility to reposition and enhance this property, guiding it on a path of recovery and ultimately leaving it in a better place than we entered. We look forward to making this vision a reality.”

The hotel will retain the Renaissance brand and continue to be managed by Marriott, the Axton Group said.

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The Axton Group Closes Acquisition of the Renaissance Austin Hotel for $70 Million

SAN FRANCISCO, Nov. 24, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — An affiliate of The Axton Group (“Axton”) today announced the firm has closed on the acquisition of the Renaissance Austin Hotel for $70 million. The 492-room, full-service hotel in north Austin is one of the city’s largest hotels, with spacious guest rooms including 88 suites, many upscale amenities, and spectacular views of the Texas Hill Country and the downtown Austin skyline. The hotel features 77,600 square feet of indoor and outdoor meeting and event facilities.

Like all hotels across the country, Renaissance Austin Hotel’s occupancy is currently low as a result of COVID-19. The city of Austin is one of the fastest growing in the country, with booming growth in the technology, medical and biotech sectors, and other major tenants and employers.

Peter Oberndorf, Founder and CEO of Axton, said, “This investment is representative of the cyclical nature of hotel assets, which have been even more acutely impacted in this current environment than previous economic cycles given the dynamics of the pandemic. It is now our responsibility to reposition and enhance this property, guiding it on a path of recovery and ultimately leaving it in a better place than we entered. We look forward to making this vision a reality. We are seeking additional opportunities where we believe we can acquire assets and add value at an attractive entry basis, in robust markets with excellent long-term fundamentals and promising growth prospects.”

Austin has major and expanding tenants including Apple, Google, Hewlett-Packard, Cisco, Microsoft, Dell, 3M, University of Texas and the Texas State Capital government. The city is also a leading tourist destination historically hosting over 27 million visitors each year.

Andrew Slusser, Principal at Axton, said, “Our purchase of the Renaissance Austin Hotel reflects the reduced capital availability in the hospitality industry. We see great value at our point of entry and expect the property to return to and grow its pre-COVID earnings over the coming years.”

Axton is planning renovations to the hotel’s public spaces and meeting rooms that will position the property as a premier venue for the meeting and event business that the firm anticipates will gradually return in the post-COVID era. The immediate renovations call for significant improvements to the hotel entrance; a redesign of the lobby and the majestic atrium; creating more revenue-generating spaces, while maintaining functionality for group events, with the goal of offering a more attractive and modern look and feel for guests. Planned meeting and banquet space renovations will enhance the property and enable it to be more competitive with newer product as the market recovers.

The hotel will continue to be managed by Marriott under the Renaissance Brand.

The purchase price of the hotel represents more than a 50% discount to replacement cost. Axton is actively evaluating opportunistic investments across the U.S. from sellers seeking liquidity. The firm has a contrarian view that select properties in strong markets with high return on investment repositioning dynamics will allow for a

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Xenia Hotels & Resorts Completes Dispositions Of Hotel Commonwealth And Renaissance Austin Hotel

ORLANDO, Fla., Nov. 24, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Xenia Hotels & Resorts, Inc. (NYSE: XHR) (“Xenia” or the “Company”) today announced it has completed the previously announced dispositions of the 245-room Hotel Commonwealth in Boston, Massachusetts for $113.0 million, or approximately $461,000 per key, and the 492-room Renaissance Austin Hotel in Austin, Texas for $70.0 million, or approximately $142,000 per key. In addition to the sale proceeds, the Company retained a total of $6.6 million in cash that was held in the properties’ FF&E reserves.

“We are pleased to have completed both of these transactions in an efficient manner,” commented Marcel Verbaas, Xenia’s Chairman and Chief Executive Officer. “Year to date, we have now sold four hotels for nearly $400 million. These dispositions have allowed us to efficiently raise a significant amount of capital at a superior cost to other alternatives. Additionally, we have successfully increased our balance sheet flexibility to help position the Company to be opportunistic as the recovery takes hold.”

The sale price for Hotel Commonwealth represented an 11.8x multiple on the hotel’s 2019 Hotel EBITDA, while the Renaissance Austin’s sale price represented a 6.8x multiple on its 2019 Hotel EBITDA. Including the dispositions of Residence Inn Boston Cambridge and Marriott Napa Valley Hotel & Spa, which were both completed in October, the combined sale prices of the four properties sold by the Company in 2020 represented an approximately 10x multiple on 2019 Hotel EBITDA.

“Our high-quality portfolio has afforded us the opportunity to create meaningful additional liquidity and balance sheet flexibility as the COVID-19 pandemic has profoundly impacted our Company and the lodging industry as a whole,” continued Mr. Verbaas. “The sale of Hotel Commonwealth at a highly attractive valuation, particularly given the current uncertain operating environment, is representative of the value embedded in our portfolio. Meanwhile, the sale price for Renaissance Austin reflects its dependence on corporate and group demand which have been severely affected by the pandemic, as well as the hotel’s substantial near-term capital needs and its location in a market where a significant number of higher-quality and better-located hotels have opened in recent years. Having completed the most recent renovations to the hotel’s guest rooms and the majority of its public and meeting space almost 8 years ago, we believe the sale of this non-strategic hotel, which achieved the second-lowest RevPAR in our portfolio in 2019, was the most prudent course of action at this time.  With our recently completed dispositions and additional balance sheet activity, we believe we have taken the right steps during this pandemic to position the Company for future growth.”

Proceeds from the sales will be utilized to repay borrowings under the Company’s line of credit and for general corporate purposes.

About Xenia Hotels & Resorts, Inc.
Xenia Hotels & Resorts, Inc. is a self-advised and self-administered REIT that invests in uniquely positioned luxury and upper upscale hotels and resorts, with a focus on the top 25 U.S. lodging markets as well as key

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As Austin weighs new hotel levy, operators ask for more details



a tall building in a city: Construction continues on the 5th and Brazos development in downtown Austin on Thursday. The project will include more than 400 hotel rooms. The Austin City Council is considering adding a 1% to 2% assessment on hotels that have more than 100 rooms. [Stephen Spillman/For Statesman]


© Provided by Austin American-Statesman
Construction continues on the 5th and Brazos development in downtown Austin on Thursday. The project will include more than 400 hotel rooms. The Austin City Council is considering adding a 1% to 2% assessment on hotels that have more than 100 rooms. [Stephen Spillman/For Statesman]

Roughly 160 hotels in Austin could soon be required to give up 1% to 2% of their nightly revenue to the city, with the city then using that money to promote Austin to the convention planning industry.

The assessment would be made on hotels with 100 or more rooms for sleeping, and it would pay for costs associated with marketing and sales, primarily for the Austin Convention Center and the Palmer Events Center. City staff projections are that the assessment would produce $4.8 million to $24.5 million annually.

The creation of the Austin Tourism Public Improvement District, which would operate the program, was scheduled for a vote Thursday by the Austin City Council. However, members of the local hotel community were granted a delay to review the plan. The assessment won’t be official until 60% of hotel owners whose properties are in the district give their approval.



a tall building in a city: The new Austin Marriott Downtown, shown Thursday, is scheduled to open early next year near the Austin Convention Center. The City Council is considering a new 1% to 2% assessment on hotels with more than 100 rooms. [Stephen Spillman/For Statesman]


© Provided by Austin American-Statesman
The new Austin Marriott Downtown, shown Thursday, is scheduled to open early next year near the Austin Convention Center. The City Council is considering a new 1% to 2% assessment on hotels with more than 100 rooms. [Stephen Spillman/For Statesman]

Tom Noonan, president of Visit Austin, the city’s convention and visitors’ bureau, said the hotel operators wanted “more information on how to best implement this opportunity.” He said 80 to 100 hotel groups would be subject to the assessment, but, in theory, they could receive an overall benefit from increased hotel traffic.



a sign on the side of a building: The new Austin Marriott Downtown, shown Thursday, is scheduled to open early next year near the Austin Convention Center. The Austin City Council is considering adding a 1% to 2% assessment on hotels that have more than 100 rooms. [Stephen Spillman/ for Statesman]


© Provided by Austin American-Statesman
The new Austin Marriott Downtown, shown Thursday, is scheduled to open early next year near the Austin Convention Center. The Austin City Council is considering adding a 1% to 2% assessment on hotels that have more than 100 rooms. [Stephen Spillman/ for Statesman]

The earliest the City Council would revisit the new assessment would be during a work session Dec. 1. Some of the details that need to be addressed will be handled in private session, City Manager Spencer Cronk said Thursday.

The planned assessment dates back to a resolution the council passed in May 2019 that directed Cronk to engage with hotel and tourism groups and homelessness service providers to prepare for establishing the new tourism district. At that same meeting, the council gave preliminary approval to a $1.2 billion expansion to the convention center. Financial projections show the planned expansion would inject an additional $306 million per year into the local economy, but only if large events are again held in-person after the COVID-19 pandemic subsides.



Workers are constructing the 5th and Brazos development, which will include more than 400 hotel rooms. The City Council is considering a new assessment on hotels with 100 or more rooms to pay for costs associated with convention marketing and sales, primarily for the Austin Convention Center and the Palmer Events Center. [Stephen Spillman/For Statesman]


© Provided by Austin American-Statesman
Workers are constructing the 5th and Brazos development, which will include more than 400 hotel rooms. The City Council is considering a new assessment on hotels with 100

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