Tag: architecture

Hotel, home and “hut” among architecture winners

A hotel, home and a “hut” are among seven buildings designed by central Ohio architectural firms recognized this week in the annual American Institute of Architects contest.



a small house in a forest: The "hut," a 600-square-foot cabin near Flushing, Ohio, designed by the Midland architectural firm, received an honor award in the "small project" category in the annual awards sponsored by the Columbus chapter of the American Institute of Architects.


© Greg Dutton
The “hut,” a 600-square-foot cabin near Flushing, Ohio, designed by the Midland architectural firm, received an honor award in the “small project” category in the annual awards sponsored by the Columbus chapter of the American Institute of Architects.

The buildings were chosen from 57 entries, and illustrate the breadth of work being done by Columbus-area architects and designers. This year’s winners, chosen by five members of the Philadelphia AIA chapter: 



This Victorian Village home renovation by Rogers Krajnak Architects received a merit award in the "small project" category in the 2020 AIA Awards sponsored by the Columbus Chapter of the American Institute of Architects.


© Brad Feinknopf, Feinknopf Photography
This Victorian Village home renovation by Rogers Krajnak Architects received a merit award in the “small project” category in the 2020 AIA Awards sponsored by the Columbus Chapter of the American Institute of Architects.

• The “hut,” a 600-square-foot cabin in Belmont County designed by the Midland architectural firm, which has offices in Pittsburgh and Columbus, received an honor award in the “small project” category. 

The $125,000 cedar-clad box is fully off the grid, relying on solar power and collected rain water. The project, which was featured on the Discovery Network’s “Building Off the Grid” show, was praised by judges “for its simple elegance, intentional siting, and beautiful execution.”



a large building: The Columbus architectural firm Moody Nolan designed the University of Cincinnati's Health Science Building.


© James Steinkamp, Connor Steinkamp
The Columbus architectural firm Moody Nolan designed the University of Cincinnati’s Health Science Building.

• The 117,000-square-foot University of Cincinnati Health Science Building, designed by Moody Nolan in Columbus, received an honor award in the “large project” category. 

The $39 million project, which received LEED Gold status for its low environmental impact, was called “superbly executed from concept to execution,” by the jury, which added that “the project team executed the interior and exterior detailing with the utmost craft.”



a kitchen area with a building in the background: The interior architecture of Bath & Body Works' Research and Development Center in New Albany, designed by WSA, was honored in the AIA awards.


© AJ Brown
The interior architecture of Bath & Body Works’ Research and Development Center in New Albany, designed by WSA, was honored in the AIA awards.

• The 53,000-square-foot Bath & Body Works Research and Development Center in New Albany, designed by the Columbus firm WSA, received an honor award for interior architecture. 

Judges called the $7.1 million project “a compelling example of adaptive re-use and interior architecture” and particularly celebrated its effectiveness in connecting the building’s users.



a large room: The Mission Salon in Dublin, designed by Tim Lai ArchitecT received a merit award in the new category of "architectural detail."


© Lauren Davis, Feinknopf Photography
The Mission Salon in Dublin, designed by Tim Lai ArchitecT received a merit award in the new category of “architectural detail.”

• The 2,000-square-foot Mission Salon in Dublin, designed by Tim Lai AchitecT, received a merit award in the new category of “architectural detail.” 

The design relied on natural materials, restrained colors and light to create gender-neutral space. “The shape of natural light through the skylight transforms the found ‘strip mall’ condition,” wrote the judges, who called the space “radiant.” 



a tall building in a city: Judges praised the interactive hummingbird murals on the side of the Graduate Columbus hotel in the Short North.


© Lauren Davis, Feinknopf Photography
Judges praised the interactive hummingbird murals on the side of the Graduate Columbus hotel in the Short North.

• The renovation of a 94,068-square-foot Short North building into the Graduate Columbus hotel, designed

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10 hidden gems of local UK architecture: readers’ travel tips



Photograph: Colin Underhill/Alamy


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Colin Underhill/Alamy

Winning tip: Brewing splendour, Staffordshire



Drink it in … Bass brewery water tower seen from Andresey Bridge, Burton-upon-Trent.


© Photograph: Colin Underhill/Alamy
Drink it in … Bass brewery water tower seen from Andresey Bridge, Burton-upon-Trent.

Bass Water Tower next to the Wash Lands in Burton upon Trent is a fine example of Victorian brewery architecture and an engineering feat in brickwork. Grade II-listed, it is an emblem of the town’s 19th-century heyday as the brewery centre of the world. Majestically rising above the skyline, it can clearly be seen when crossing over the old Trent Bridge. It is one of the few remaining iconic brewery buildings, and can be visited (though not this month) by arrangement with the National Brewery Museum.

Haydn Vernon

Pumping iron, Cambridgeshire



a small house in a body of water: Steam driven pumping station on the Great Ouse


© Provided by The Guardian
Steam driven pumping station on the Great Ouse

Stretham Old Engine, on the Great Ouse River near Ely, is an enduring reminder of both the feats of 19th-century engineering and the nature of its locality. The steam-powered drainage engine pumped water from the ever-shrinking fen up into the river. This method replaced windmill-driven engines and was later usurped by electric pumps. The building is still a striking part of its surroundings, identifiable from a distance by its tall chimney and constructed from pale yellow Cambridgeshire gault brick. It is best appreciated when approached on foot on one of the riverside footpaths – or maybe by boat.

£4/£1, normally open Sundays and bank holidays April-Oct, strethamoldengine.org.uk

Sharon Pinner

Soot-stained history, Isle of Lewis

Traditional “blackhouses” dot the Outer Hebrides. The best collection is at Gearrannan on Lewis. The last permanent residents moved out in 1973, after which the village was converted into a museum which includes a house recreated as it would have looked in 1953. Blackhouses were so named because their walls were stained black with soot. Smoke escaped through the roof as the houses didn’t have chimneys. The houses’ double drystone walls, low profile and insulating thatch made them well suited to the Hebridean climate. Roofs are weighted with tethered stones. In normal times you can stay in the village – in modernised properties.

Paul Kirkwood

Home to roost, Fife



a building with a green field: White Century Priory Dovecot near Crail Harbour,


© Provided by The Guardian
White Century Priory Dovecot near Crail Harbour,

At first sight, this rendered sandstone tower could perhaps be mistaken for an ancient windmill. However, the Doocot of Crail (1550) on the East Neuk of Fife coast, is no such thing. Stepping inside, as if into Narnia, we were amazed to find about 700 pigeon nesting holes in the walls. Particularly impressive is the unusual revolving central ladder called a potence (French for gallows). You first peer down through the floor grating, and your eyes are then drawn upwards to where openings once allowed pigeons in to nest, getting fat and laying eggs for their owners, while the wild raptors were kept out.

scotlandsplaces.gov.uk

Ruth Clay

Glorious Georgian barn, Cumbria

I wonder how many people actually stop to admire this well-maintained, traditional Cumbrian barn as they walk along

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Palm Beach board OKs architecture for Palm House hotel renovation


The Architectural Commission approved the architecture but wants to restudy the landscaping plan for the long-stagnant Palm House hotel property in Palm Beach.

Darrell Hofheinz
 
| Palm Beach Daily News

The Palm Beach Architectural Commission voted 6-1 last week to approve revisions to the architecture of the Palm House hotel renovation project, which has remained unfinished for years.

But the board wants to take another look at the light peach color the building at 160 Royal Palm Way will be painted.

Commissioners, however, deferred the hotel’s landscaping plan to its Nov. 20 meeting for a restudy. The landscaping was extensively discussed at the board’s meeting Wednesday by attorneys representing neighbors on Brazilian Avenue, whose properties back up to the hotel’s southern boundary.

The board first reviewed the renovation project in September and requested multiple revisions. 

The project was designed by a team led by architect Sean McLendon of Cooper Carry in Atlanta for the hotel’s latest owner, a company affiliated with London + Regional Properties. The hotel property changed hands for about $40 million in May 2018 via a private sale approved by a bankruptcy court. No construction work has been carried out at the shuttered building for six years.

Commissioners last week said they want more information about where plant buffers on the southern perimeter will be installed and how the landscaping there will be affected by the constraints of building setbacks and a 5-foot-wide easement shared by the hotel and neighboring homes.

“If you were living behind this (hotel), what would you want to see done?” asked attorney John Eubanks, who represented two of the neighboring property owners.

Commissioners also asked the design team to restudy the landscaping on the east side of the hotel, opposite a commercial building, and consider adding a service gate there at the driveway leading from Royal Palm Way.

Like Eubanks, attorney Don Lunny, representing another neighbor, said his client was concerned about the impact of three items recently added to plans that were approved by the town years ago.  Those include a prep kitchen for the hotel’s banquet room; a bar and restroom area in the pool courtyard; and a fountain feature at the south end of the pool.

In a separate vote, the commission endorsed 11 code variances for the project, which are expected to be considered for approval Nov. 13 by the Town Council, said Palm House attorney Maura Ziska.

Commissioners learned from the design team that the trash-collection area at the southeast corner of the building will be removed. That had been a concern of one of the neighbors directly behind the garbage area.

Instead, the hotel will now keep its garbage in the hotel’s basement in cold storage until it is picked up, Ziska said. Commissioner Jeffrey Smith had suggested that option at the September meeting.

Commissioner Alexander Ives cast the lone vote against approving the architecture, saying it needed refinements to unify the scale of different parts of the building.

But he acknowledged that the designers are

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Palm Springs’ architecture, adventure are just a click away

Yellow striped umbrellas shade the poolside chaises, the sky above a technicolor blue and — wait a sec. Let’s try the purple ridges of Mount San Jacinto against a tangerine sunset sky and — hmm. Would the vintage black and white party scene be better?

If we can’t be in Palm Springs for real, we’re going to thoroughly pretend we are, using 21st century tech to immerse ourselves in that mid-century modernist vibe. But choosing a Zoom backdrop for a mod happy hour is proving more challenging than expected.

It’s opening night of Palm Springs’ Modernism Week Preview — and like so many other things in this world, the celebration has gone virtual, starting with a “Live from the Zoom Zoom Room” happy hour, complete with snappy repartee and a DJ spinning discs from the ’60s. As it turns out, our backdrop doesn’t matter. All we need to pair with those Rat Pack-era tunes is the syncopation of a martini-filled cocktail shaker and a little time travel.

For the last 15 years, Palm Springs’ Modernism Week has celebrated this mecca of mid-century style, and the distinctive cityscape designed by Albert Frey, Donald Wexler, Richard Neutra and other architectural icons, with house tours, film screenings, panel discussions and parties. And the newer fall Modernism Week Preview has become a celebration of its own with four days of splashy events. Normally, that is.

This year’s preview is not only virtual, it runs through November and offers half a dozen streaming architecture tours — including “Palms Springsland” — and special events you can enjoy from home. The only live event, the online Zoom Zoom Room frolic, was in mid-October, but it included enough fun elements to start any party, from the vintage tunes and martinis to an architect-inspired drinking game. Take a sip when you hear the name Frey, host Kellee McQuinn told modernism fans during the Zoom party, and the chat screen erupted with delighted shouts: Frey! Sip! Frey!! Sip!!

Streaming “Palms Springsland” ($35) the next evening, we realize why. Frey gets a shout out every two minutes on the whirlwind tour led by midcentury pop culture expert Charles Phoenix. So do his colleagues Neutra and Wexler, because their work is everywhere. Phoenix leads some of the most popular architecture tours during real-life Modernism Week, offering exuberant commentary atop a double-decker bus. In the virtual version, he takes viewers on a 40-minute joyride through Palm Springs, peppering his narration with historical tidbits, architectural context and delighted exclamations, including his catch phrase, “I know!”

Eager for more architectural fun on our virtual Palm Springs getaway, we queue up the more sedate “Modernism Week Signature Home Tour” ($35) next for a streaming look inside five homes, including the Edris House designed in 1954 by E. Stewart Williams. Williams was Frank Sinatra’s architect, too, for his Twin Palms Estate.

A post-screening email from the Modernism Week organizers brings a bonus: A link to virtual tours of all five, so you can “walk” through each room,

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