Tag: Americans

Americans want to travel for Thanksgiving, but the flood of Covid-19 cases can’t be ignored

Leading up to Thanksgiving, airlines in the United States were still somewhat upbeat about the prospects for the holiday travel season. There had been palpable pent-up demand among consumers to visit friends and family, and what better time than around the holidays to do that?



a group of people that are standing in the water: Passengers walk through Salt Lake City International Airport on October 27, 2020 in Salt Lake City.


© Rick Bowmer/AP
Passengers walk through Salt Lake City International Airport on October 27, 2020 in Salt Lake City.

But that outlook has dramatically changed as the seven-day average Covid-19 case count jumped between November 1 and November 15 and health and government officials warned against Thanksgiving travel and gatherings. Daily deaths from Covid-19 have been reaching levels not seen since the spring.

Major US carriers are now seeing rising cancellations and softness in bookings. The demand uptick they were counting on during the holidays is evaporating with the coronavirus surge. In a best-case scenario, any rise in demand won’t be nearly as large as had been anticipated only a couple of weeks ago.

Thanksgiving is typically one of the busiest periods of the year for airlines, with a record 31.6 million Americans flying in the days just before and after the holiday in 2019 . That amounted to about $8 billion out of $247 billion in total US airline revenue last year.

Based on current recovery trends and recent holiday travel increases, Oliver Wyman now projects a 60% to 65% decline in 2020’s Thanksgiving travel period over the same 12 days in 2019. Given the uncertainty over new government restrictions and rising case counts, we also see a potential for even more last-minute cancellations and cuts in capacity by airlines.

In anticipation of a bump in demand over the Thanksgiving holiday period, the airlines had expanded daily domestic schedules by more than 1,300 flights and 150,000 seats. Low-cost carriers have been particularly aggressive chasing holiday travel and have added to their flights and seats even more than the larger network airlines.

It’s not as if the optimism was unfounded: Americans really want to travel again. And after eight months of shutdowns, mask wearing and social distancing, pandemic fatigue and a bottled-up desire for normalcy might still push many to visit friends and family around the holiday — despite all the warnings not to. Expectations are for an even greater percentage than usual to opt for the perceived safety of their cars over transportation with strangers.

This shouldn’t come as a surprise — even though the seven-day average for new case counts is expected to top 180,000 a day by Thanksgiving, according to projections by the Oliver Wyman Pandemic Navigator. Travel by Americans also jumped over the Labor Day weekend, when medical experts expressed similar concerns about a potential spike in cases as a result of increased mobility and socializing.

Until the recent surge, personal judgment — ahead of government restrictions, guidance from the World Health Organization or Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or even the advent of a vaccine — had been governing individual decisions on travel. According to Oliver Wyman’s October

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Millions of Americans set to ignore warnings against Thanksgiving travel

Experts urged Americans against traveling for family gatherings at Thanksgiving this week even though millions were set to defy the advice, as the US crossed the threshold of more than 12m cases of coronavirus.



a group of people with luggage at an airport: Photograph: Michael Dwyer/AP


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Photograph: Michael Dwyer/AP

Related: US vaccine expert predicts life could be back to normal around May

Ominous warnings came as Donald Trump appeared to admit that coronavirus is “running wild” across the US, in contrast with his statements throughout the election campaign that the virus would simply “go away” or “disappear” and, more recently, that the country was “rounding the turn” on the pandemic.



a group of people with luggage at an airport: JetBlue terminal at Logan Airport, on 20 November in Boston. Dr Anthony Fauci said on Sunday the country was in ‘a very, very difficult situation at all levels’.


© Photograph: Michael Dwyer/AP
JetBlue terminal at Logan Airport, on 20 November in Boston. Dr Anthony Fauci said on Sunday the country was in ‘a very, very difficult situation at all levels’.

As new Covid-19 infections in the US approached 200,000 a day, Trump tweeted on Saturday night to insist things were bad outside the United States as well, posting: “The Fake News is not talking about the fact that ‘Covid’ is running wild all over the world, not just in the US.”

On Sunday, Dr Anthony Fauci, the leading infectious disease expert in the US and top public health official on the White House coronavirus taskforce, said the country was in “a very, very difficult situation at all levels” with infections rising dramatically.

He followed up official government advice on Friday from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to Americans not to travel and gather with relatives and friends at the Thanksgiving holiday this coming Thursday.

Fauci said that, more than the risk of flying itself, it was busy airports that made him more concerned.

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Analysis: Can first COVID-19 vaccines bring herd immunity? Experts have doubts

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“You are at a crowded airport, you are lining up, not everybody is wearing masks. That puts yourself at risk … that’s what’s going to get us into even more trouble,” he said.

Fauci warned of “seemingly innocent get-togethers” indoors with family and friends.

As many as 50 million people are expected to travel by various means this week to celebrate Thanksgiving, potentially producing a new surge in infections that will manifest a couple of weeks later and threaten the Christmas holidays, too, Fauci warned.

Maryland’s Republican governor, Larry Hogan, said “we are pretty worried” about Americans planning to defy advice from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and travel for Thanksgiving and gather in unsafe circumstances.

“Family gathering is the number one transmission event,” he said, warning that people let their guard down at such events, failing to wear masks properly and breaking social distancing rules.

The US has recorded a million new cases of coronavirus a week for the past two weeks and now has 12.1m cases and a death toll of 256,000, the highest numbers in the world, as tracked by the Johns Hopkins coronavirus

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Fauci urges Americans to conduct ‘risk-benefit assessment’ before holiday travel

Top infectious disease expert Anthony Fauci urged Americans on Sunday to conduct a “risk-benefit assessment” before traveling for the holidays as Thanksgiving approaches this week.



Anthony S. Fauci wearing a suit and tie: Fauci urges Americans to conduct 'risk-benefit assessment' before holiday travel


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Fauci urges Americans to conduct ‘risk-benefit assessment’ before holiday travel

Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), told NBC News’ “Meet the Press” that families need to consider the risks of gathering indoors. He said families especially need to take into account if their gatherings plan to include those who are elderly or have underlying conditions affecting their immune system.

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“I think the people in this country need to realistically do a risk-benefit assessment,” he said. “Every family is different. Everyone has a different level of risk that they want to tolerate.”

The NIAID director acknowledged that holiday gatherings “have been such joyous things in the past,” but added “this is a very special situation.”

“So you don’t want to call it all off, but you want to say at least give you and your family the benefit of having considered what is the risk-benefit of doing that as opposed to constraining what you do to the very core people who live in your home,” he said. “You just need to consider it and make your own decision.”

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Moderna CMO on peer review process for new Covid-19 vaccine

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Fauci emphasized that the almost exponentially rising numbers in the country “doesn’t necessarily” have to continue.

“We’re not going to completely eliminate it and turn it around rapidly and dramatically, but we can prevent it from increasing,” he said.

“We should not accept that we can’t do anything about that,” the public health expert added. “Putting vaccines aside for a moment, which will be extraordinarily helpful, if we implement the simple public health measures that I was mentioning to you, we can blunt that inflection. It doesn’t have to be as high up.”

The U.S. reached the milestone of 250,000 COVID-19 deaths last week, since the beginning of the pandemic this spring. The country documented single-day records for hospitalizations on Saturday with 83,227 currently hospitalized, according to the COVID Tracking Project.

On Friday, the U.S. confirmed a record-number of COVID-19 cases in a single day at 192,805 new cases.

Last week, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended against traveling for Thanksgiving amid the ongoing surge in cases.

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U.S. hits 12 million COVID-19 cases as many Americans defy Thanksgiving travel guidance

By Gabriella Borter



a group of people standing in front of a building: People wearing protective masks are seen at Rockefeller Center as the global outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, in New York City


© Reuters/JEENAH MOON
People wearing protective masks are seen at Rockefeller Center as the global outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, in New York City

(Reuters) – The United States recorded its 12th million COVID-19 case on Saturday, even as millions of Americans were expected to travel for the upcoming Thanksgiving holiday, ignoring warnings from health officials about furthering the spread of the infectious disease.

More than 12,010,000 cases of the coronavirus were reported, according to a Reuters tally of public health data, capping a series of days with record-breaking infections, with the Midwest experiencing one of the most dramatic increases in cases per capita.



a group of people walking down a street next to tall buildings: People wearing protective masks take a selfie in front of Rockefeller Center as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, in New York City


© Reuters/JEENAH MOON
People wearing protective masks take a selfie in front of Rockefeller Center as the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, in New York City

The COVID-19 epidemic has claimed more than 255,000 lives in the United States – more than in any other nation – according to the Reuters tally – and the recent escalation has prompted more than 20 states to impose sweeping new restrictions this month to curb the virus.

Reuters data shows the pace of new U.S. infections has quickened, with nearly one million more cases recorded in just the last 6 days before the latest record. This compares with the 8 days it took to get from 10 million cases to 11 million, and the 10 days it took to get from 9 million to 10 million.

More than 1 million people flew through U.S. airports on Friday, according to data from the Transportation Security Administration, fueling fears of even greater spread of the virus. It was the second-heaviest domestic air traffic day since the start of the pandemic, despite pleas from health officials for Americans to stay home.



a group of people standing in a room: FILE PHOTO: Volunteers hand out Thanksgiving turkeys and bags of free holiday food to those in need at the Central Family Life Center in Staten Island, New York


© Reuters/BRENDAN MCDERMID
FILE PHOTO: Volunteers hand out Thanksgiving turkeys and bags of free holiday food to those in need at the Central Family Life Center in Staten Island, New York

“This is the 2nd time since the pandemic passenger volume has surpassed 1 million,” TSA spokeswoman Lisa Farbstein wrote on Twitter on Saturday.

Friday marked another milestone in the United States as the highest number of new COVID-19 cases was reported – 196,815 infections in a day.

Health officials have warned that the burgeoning wave of infections could soon overwhelm the healthcare system if people do not follow public health guidance, particularly around not traveling and mingling with other households for Thursday’s traditional Thanksgiving celebration.

Still, video footage on Twitter showed more than a hundred people, wearing masks, crowding departure gates at Sky Harbor airport in Phoenix, Arizona, on Friday. Lines for TSA checkpoints and kiosks at Chicago O’Hare airport were also long on Friday and “reminiscent of pre-pandemic times,” local TV station WGN reported.



a person riding a skate board: People wearing a protective masks skate t the skating rink at Rockefeller Center as the global outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, in New York City


© Reuters/JEENAH MOON
People wearing a protective masks skate t the skating rink at Rockefeller Center as the global outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) continues, in New York City

The number of Thanksgiving air travelers was

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Many Americans defy Thanksgiving travel guidance as U.S. nears 12 million COVID-19 cases

By Gabriella Borter



a car parked in a parking lot: A healthcare worker holds a coronavirus disease (COVID-19) informational pamphlet for a resident at a drive-thru testing location in Houston


© Reuters/ADREES LATIF
A healthcare worker holds a coronavirus disease (COVID-19) informational pamphlet for a resident at a drive-thru testing location in Houston

(Reuters) – Millions of people in the United States were expected to travel for the upcoming Thanksgiving holiday, ignoring warnings from health officials about furthering the spread of COVID-19 as the nation was on the verge of recording its 12 millionth case on Saturday.

More than 1 million people flew through U.S. airports on Friday, according to data from the Transportation Security Administration. That made it the second-heaviest domestic air traffic day since the start of the pandemic, despite pleas from health officials for Americans to stay home and stop the spread of the virus.

Many Americans defy Thanksgiving travel guidance as U.S. nears 12 million COVID-19 cases

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“This is the 2nd time since the pandemic passenger volume has surpassed 1 million,” TSA spokeswoman Lisa Farbstein wrote on Twitter on Saturday.

Friday marked another milestone in the United States as the highest number of new COVID-19 cases was reported – 196,815 infections in a day.

Health officials have warned that the burgeoning wave of infections could soon overwhelm the healthcare system if people do not follow public health guidance, particularly around not traveling and mingling with other households for Thursday’s traditional Thanksgiving celebration.

Still, video footage on Twitter showed more than a hundred people, wearing masks, crowding departure gates at Sky Harbor airport in Phoenix, Arizona, on Friday. Lines for TSA checkpoints and kiosks at Chicago O’Hare airport were also long on Friday and “reminiscent of pre-pandemic times,” local TV station WGN reported.

The number of Thanksgiving air travelers was expected to decline by 47.5% from 2019, but 2.4 million people were forecast to take to the skies, according to a report earlier this month from the American Automobile Association. It said the number traveling by car was expected to fall by only about 4%.

“For those who are considering making a trip, the majority will go by car, which provides the flexibility to modify holiday travel plans up until the day of departure,” AAA Senior Vice President Paula Twidale said in a statement.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control has issued a “strong recommendation” to Americans to refrain from all kinds of travel over Thanksgiving.

“We’re alarmed with the exponential increase in cases, hospitalizations, and deaths,” CDC official Henry Walke told reporters on Thursday.

The number of COVID-19 cases in the United States was on track to surpass 12 million on Saturday, with the Midwest experiencing one of the most dramatic increases in cases per capita.

The COVID-19 epidemic has claimed nearly 255,000 lives in the United States – more than in any other nation – according to a Reuters tally of public health data, and the recent escalation has prompted more than 20 states to impose sweeping new restrictions this month to curb the virus.

Reuters data shows the pace of new U.S. infections has quickened,

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CDC pleads with Americans to avoid Thanksgiving travel

NEW YORK (AP) — With the coronavirus surging out of control, the nation’s top public health agency pleaded with Americans on Thursday not to travel for Thanksgiving and not to spend the holiday with people from outside their household.

The Thanksgiving warning from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention came as the White House coronavirus task force held a briefing for the first time in months and Vice President Mike Pence concluded it without responding to questions by reporters or urging Americans not to travel.

Other members of the task force — whose media briefings were a daily fixture during the early days of the outbreak — talked about the progress being made in the development of a vaccine.


Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said pharmaceutical companies Pfizer and BioNTech will seek emergency government approval for their coronavirus vaccine on Friday. And infection disease expert Dr. Anthony Fauci sought to reassure the public that the vaccine is safe while still encouraging Americans to wear masks.

The CDC’s Thanksgiving warning was some of the firmest guidance yet from the government on curtailing traditional gatherings to fight the outbreak.

The CDC issued the recommendations just one week before Thanksgiving, at a time when diagnosed infections, hospitalizations and deaths are skyrocketing across the country. In many areas, the health care system is being squeezed by a combination of sick patients filling up beds and medical workers falling ill themselves.

The CDC’s Dr. Erin Sauber-Schatz cited more than 1 million new cases in the U.S. over the past week as the reason for the new guidance.

“The safest way to celebrate Thanksgiving this year is at home with the people in your household,” she said.

If families do decide to include returning college students, military members or others for turkey and stuffing, the CDC is recommending that the hosts take added precautions: Gatherings should be outdoors if possible, with people keeping 6 feet apart and wearing masks and just one person serving the food.

Whether Americans heed the warning is another matter. The deadly comeback by the virus has been blamed in part on pandemic fatigue, or people getting tired of masks and other precautions. And surges were seen last summer after Memorial Day and July Fourth, despite blunt warnings from health authorities.

The United States has had more than 11 million diagnosed infections and over 250,000 deaths from the coronavirus. CDC scientists believe that somewhere around 40% of people who are infected do not have obvious symptoms but can still spread the virus.

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CALIFORNIA CURFEW

Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom on Thursday announced the imposition of an overnight curfew on most residents as the most populous state tries to head off a virus case surge that officials fears could tax the state’s health care system.

What officials called a limited stay-at-home order requires nonessential residents to stay home from 10 p.m. to 5 a.m. starting Saturday. It lasts until Dec. 21 but could be extended. It covers 94% of the

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Americans are planning their next vacation even though it’ll probably be months before most people can get a COVID-19 vaccine



a large body of water with a city in the background: With news of a vaccine, Americans are ready to visit big cities again. Westend61/Getty Images


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With news of a vaccine, Americans are ready to visit big cities again. Westend61/Getty Images

  • When the news of potential coronavirus vaccines broke, some people immediately started planning their next vacation. 
  • Skyscanner saw spikes in both searches and bookings on the days that news of a potential coronavirus vaccine hit. 
  • While the pandemic had travelers avoiding big cities, when news of the Pfizer vaccine broke, people started searching for big cities once more.
  • When news of Moderna’s vaccine hit, travelers started dreaming bigger and began searching for more international destinations.
  • The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warns that “travel increases your chance of getting and spreading COVID-19.”
  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

When the news of potential coronavirus vaccines broke, the world uttered a collective sigh of relief.

And, despite the fact that the vaccines likely won’t be available to everyone in the US until May 2021, some people have immediately started planning their next vacation. 

Travel search engine Skyscanner told Insider that on November 9, 2020, when news of Pfizer’s promising vaccine broke, searches for economy class round-trips from the US increased by 39% compared to the previous day. Bookings jumped 25%.

Similarly, on November 16, 2020, when news of the promising Moderna vaccine hit, searches for economy class round-trips from the US rose by 63% compared to the previous day. Bookings spiked 17%.

On November 9, tentative travelers kept their potential trips pretty local, with US destinations making up most of the top 10. 

However, what US cities Americans were searching for came as a surprise, as most of the list consisted of large cities, with New York, Los Angeles, and Miami rounding out the top three. 

Whereas the pandemic had travelers avoiding big cities in lieu of small towns, camping, and road trips, the vaccine news had big cities shoot up to the top of people’s bucket lists once more.

Even more interesting is that, once news of a second potentially viable vaccine broke, travelers began dreaming even bigger, with international destinations from London to Munich making up the top 10 most-searched destinations.

Most experts predicted travel rebounding

Mark Crossey, the US Traveler Expert for Skyscanner, said that US travelers are emboldened by most airlines’ scrapped change fees.

“The emergence of truly flexible travel fares has not gone unnoticed, and US travelers are taking advantage,” he said, adding that low fares and flexibility will likely be around for a while to encourage bookings.

He added that the post-vaccine news spike just shows how unwavering Americans’ appetite for travel is.

Insider reported in April that many experts predicted this, agreeing that while the question of when and how long it will take to get there was unclear, travel would rebound swiftly.

“People’s desire to travel is resilient,” a TripAdvisor spokesperson previously said in a statement to Insider. “What we’ve seen through SARS, Ebola, terrorist attacks, and numerous natural disasters is that the travel industry has always rebounded.”

“Humans need to

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As the U.S. nears the 200,000 daily case mark, Americans are urged to avoid Thanksgiving travel.

“The tragedy that could happen is one of your family members, from coming together in a family gathering, could wind up hospitalized and severely ill and could die. We don’t want to see that happen,” Dr. Walke said. “This year we’re asking people to be as safe as possible.”

College students returning home for the holiday should isolate themselves and limit interactions with friends on campus before their return. Once home, they should try to limit interactions with family members, interact outside rather than indoors, and wear masks indoors if a family member has a chronic condition that places them at risk.

Dr. Walke said he himself is not going to visit his parents, though he has not seen them in many months and they are imploring him to come home, and he has encouraged his own adult and college-aged children to isolate themselves before coming home for the holiday.

New concerns about the virus have been reflected in air travel plans. United Airlines said recently that it expected Thanksgiving week to be its busiest period since the pandemic’s onset, but on Thursday it reported that bookings had slowed and cancellations had risen in recent days. American Airlines has slashed December flights between the United States and Europe as cases rise sharply on both sides of the Atlantic.

AAA Travel said last week that it anticipates at least a 10 percent drop in travel this Thanksgiving, the largest one-year decrease since 2008, when the country was in the throes of the Great Recession. People who decide to travel are likely to drive, going shorter distances for fewer days than they may have otherwise, the organization said. Car trips were projected to fall 4.3 percent, far less than air travel. AAA cited rising cases, quarantine rules, health concerns and increased unemployment as factors.

If Americans choose to travel, they should do so as safely as possible, wearing masks and maintaining social distancing, even during the Thanksgiving meal with others outside the household.

The American Hospital Association joined with the American Nurses Association and the American Medical Association, which represents many of the nation’s doctors, to urge the public to be careful over the Thanksgiving holiday weekend.

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CDC recommends Americans don’t travel for Thanksgiving

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Holidays are usually for gatherings but many get-togethers are complicated or canceled because of COVID-19.

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is recommending against travel for Thanksgiving. 

During a news briefing Thursday, Dr. Henry Walke, the CDC’s COVID-19 incident manager, said the agency is “recommending against travel during the Thanksgiving period.”

“The tragedy that could happen is that one of your family members is coming to this family gathering and they could end up severely ill, hospitalized or dying. And we don’t want that to happen,” he said, as COVID-19 cases tick up across the country. “These times are tough, it’s been a long outbreak, almost 11 months, and we understand people are tired.”

He continued: “We understand that people want to see their family and relatives and do it as they’ve always done it. But this year we’re asking them to limit their travel.”

Walke added that Americans who do decide to travel for the holiday should do so “as safely as possible by following the same recommendations for everyday living,” including wearing a mask, staying 6 feet apart and washing your hands. 

Roger Dow, president and CEO of the U.S. Travel Association, an industry group, said he expects some people to heed the CDC’s recommendation but noted that AAA projects that 50 million Americans will travel for Thanksgiving.

“We’re equally sure that many will chose to travel,” he said, adding, “If you travel, you must travel safely.”

As for specific Thanksgiving gathering safety tips, the CDC recommends:

  • Bringing your own food, drinks, plates, cups and utensils
  • Avoiding passing by areas where food is being prepared, such as the kitchen
  • Using single-use options, like salad dressing and condiment packets
  • Using disposable items like food containers, plates and utensils.

The holidays are coming: What experts say about even small family gatherings

If you plan to host a gathering, the CDC recommends keeping it outdoors, limiting the number of people and having guests bring their own food and drink. If food is being shared, the agency suggests having only one person serve the food.

Walke also warned about who should and shouldn’t be considered safe after traveling to the gathering.

“Anyone who has not lived in your household for the last 14 days should not be considered a member of your household,” he said. “Regardless of where they’ve been, if they’re coming home and they haven’t been living with you, you definitely need to take precautions. Having their own bathroom for someone who might be an overnight guest, for example.”

That guidance includes college students returning home, the CDC said when it released details. While colleges are pleading with students to get tested or quarantine before they return home, they remain at risk to develop COVID-19 after receiving a negative test or while traveling home.

The CDC’s warning is the latest and most high profile about the risks of traveling as coronavirus cases surge across the country.

Officials in states including California and Illinois have urged residents

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Coronavirus: CDC urges Americans not to travel for Thanksgiving

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The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has told Americans to avoid travel for the Thanksgiving holiday amid soaring Covid-19 cases.

“In the last week, we’ve seen over a million new cases,” said the CDC’s Erin Sauber-Schatz to reporters on Thursday. “Thanksgiving is a week away.”

But the agency stopped short of issuing a travel ban for Americans.

The US has so far recorded more than 11.6 million coronavirus infections and more than 250,000 deaths.

Thanksgiving typically heralds the busiest week for travel in the US. Last year, an estimated 26 million travellers passed through the country’s airports in the week surrounding the holiday.

“It’s not a requirement. It’s a recommendation for the American public to consider,” Dr Henry Walke, the CDC’s Covid-19 incident manager, said during Thursday’s press briefing.

“Right now, especially as we’re seeing this sort of exponential growth in cases, and the opportunity to translocate disease or infection from one part of the country to another, it leads to our recommendation to avoid travel at this time.”

Also on Thursday, the White House coronavirus task force had its first public briefing in months. Members of the task force, including Vice-President Mike Pence, noted the rise in coronavirus cases and positivity rates – meaning the percentage of coronavirus tests that come back positive – across the country.

“This is really a call to action for every American to increase their vigilance,” said task force coordinator Dr Deborah Birx. “This is more cases, more rapidly, than what we had seen before.”

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Dr Deborah Birx warned of rising infections across the US

Though Dr Birx urged Americans to limit indoor interactions – like the type of group gatherings characteristic of Thanksgiving – the task force did not comment specifically on holiday travel. And Mr Pence in particular maintained an upbeat tone, emphasising the recent progress in vaccine development and touting the country’s improved preparedness.

“American has never been more prepared to combat this virus than we have been today,” the vice-president said.

The White House has so far declined to engage with President-elect Joe Biden and his incoming administration on coronavirus policy, as President Donald Trump refuses to concede the presidential contest.

Mr Biden on Thursday called Mr Trump’s failure to concede an “incredibly damaging message” for the rest of the world. The Democrat has said that co-ordination is necessary to combat the coronavirus outbreak.

Asked on Thursday if he would close down the economy in an effort to curb the outbreak, Mr Biden dismissed the notion of a nationwide shutdown.

“I’m going to shut down the virus. That’s what I’m going to shut down,” he said. “There’s no circumstance which I can see that would require total national shutdown.”


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