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D.C., New York and Washington state added to Massachusetts COVID high-risk list for out-of-state travel

Massachusetts added three more regions to its list of high-risk states for COVID-19.

Starting Saturday, people traveling to-and-from the District of Columbia, New York and Washington state will need to quarantine or get tested for coronavirus.

There are 44 states included on the high-risk list as of Saturday.

Gov. Charlie Baker enacted a travel order on August 1 mandating all visitors and residents entering Massachusetts following a high-risk area quarantine for 14 days or produce a negative COVID-19 test result that has been administered up to 72 hours prior to arrival in Massachusetts.

Visitors are urged to obtain a negative result before traveling to Massachusetts.

Failure to comply with the order could result in a $500 fine per day.

Exemptions are allowed for travelers from lower-risk states, people commuting for work or school and patients seeking specialized medical care.

The current list of lower-risk states includes:

  • Hawaii
  • Maine
  • New Hampshire
  • Vermont

Massachusetts residents are urged to limit any out-of-state travel only to states designated as COVID-19 lower-risk areas.

Anyone arriving from an international destination must fill out the Massachusetts Travel Form and must quarantine for 14 days or meet the 72-hour testing rule.

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CT’s Coronavirus Travel Advisory List: 2 More States Added

CONNECTICUT — Maine and New Hampshire were added to Connecticut’s coronavirus travel advisory list Tuesday. That brought the number of restricted states and territories to 46, according to the latest report from the state Department of Public Health. No areas were taken off the list.

Nonessential travel among New York, New Jersey and Connecticut remains discouraged but not formally restricted.

States or territories are added to the advisory list if they have a daily positive coronavirus test rate higher than 10 cases per 100,000 residents or a 10 percent or higher positive rate over a seven-day rolling average. Travelers who fail to complete a travel health form face a civil penalty of $1,000 for each violation.

Workers traveling from affected states to Connecticut and vice versa who work in critical infrastructure as designated by the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, including students in certain health care professions, and any state, local and federal officials and employees, are exempt from the quarantine requirement, provided such travel is work-related. Those essential workers must still complete the travel health form, however.

While there currently are no Connecticut-imposed restrictions on international travel, the federal government continues to provide international travel recommendations for anyone living inside the United States. For guidance on international travel, see the “COVID-19 Travel Recommendations” published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

See Also: Coronavirus CT: Continued Rise In Hospitalizations ‘Concerning’

As of Tuesday, the following 46 locations were included in Connecticut’s travel advisory:

  1. Alabama

  2. Alaska

  3. Arizona

  4. Arkansas

  5. California

  6. Colorado

  7. Delaware

  8. Florida

  9. Georgia

  10. Guam

  11. Idaho

  12. Illinois

  13. Indiana

  14. Iowa

  15. Kansas

  16. Kentucky

  17. Louisiana

  18. Maine

  19. Maryland

  20. Massachusetts

  21. Michigan

  22. Minnesota

  23. Mississippi

  24. Missouri

  25. Montana

  26. Nebraska

  27. Nevada

  28. New Hampshire

  29. New Mexico

  30. North Carolina

  31. North Dakota

  32. Ohio

  33. Oklahoma

  34. Oregon

  35. Pennsylvania

  36. Puerto Rico

  37. South Carolina

  38. South Dakota

  39. Tennessee

  40. Texas

  41. Utah

  42. Virginia

  43. Washington

  44. West Virginia

  45. Wisconsin

  46. Wyoming

This article originally appeared on the Across Connecticut Patch

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CT’s Coronavirus Travel Advisory List: 2 States Added

CONNECTICUT — Oregon and Washington were added to Connecticut’s coronavirus travel advisory list Tuesday and no states or territories were dropped. That brought the number of restricted areas to 44, according to the latest report from the state Department of Public Health.

This is the first Connecticut Travel Advisory update since New York broke with the state, and New Jersey, to create its own set of procedures. Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s new policy requires anyone traveling in New York to test negative for the virus within three days prior to arrival. Once they arrive in New York, travelers must quarantine for three days and, on the fourth day, get tested for the virus again. If they test positive, travelers will be required to quarantine for an additional 14 days.

Nonessential travel among the states in the tri-state area is discouraged but not formally restricted.

States are put on the advisory list if they have a daily positive coronavirus test rate higher than 10 cases per 100,000 residents or a 10 percent or higher positive rate over a seven-day rolling average. Failure to complete a travel health form carries a civil penalty of $1,000 for each violation.

There are some exceptions to the rule. Workers traveling from affected states to Connecticut and vice versa who work in critical infrastructure as designated by the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency, including students in exempt health care professions, and any state, local and federal officials and employees, are exempt from the quarantine requirement when such travel is work-related. Such essential workers are required to complete the travel health form, however.

While there currently are no Connecticut-imposed restrictions on international travel, the federal government continues to provide international travel recommendations for anyone living inside the United States. For guidance on international travel, see the “COVID-19 Travel Recommendations” published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

See Also: Town-By-Town Coronavirus Numbers Updated, Trends Cause Concern

As of Tuesday, the following 44 locations were included in Connecticut’s travel advisory:

  1. Alabama

  2. Alaska

  3. Arizona

  4. Arkansas

  5. California

  6. Colorado

  7. Delaware

  8. Florida

  9. Georgia

  10. Guam

  11. Idaho

  12. Illinois

  13. Indiana

  14. Iowa

  15. Kansas

  16. Kentucky

  17. Louisiana

  18. Maryland

  19. Massachusetts

  20. Michigan

  21. Minnesota

  22. Mississippi

  23. Missouri

  24. Montana

  25. Nebraska

  26. Nevada

  27. New Mexico

  28. North Carolina

  29. North Dakota

  30. Ohio

  31. Oklahoma

  32. Oregon

  33. Pennsylvania

  34. Puerto Rico

  35. South Carolina

  36. South Dakota

  37. Tennessee

  38. Texas

  39. Utah

  40. Virginia

  41. Washington

  42. West Virginia

  43. Wisconsin

  44. Wyoming

This article originally appeared on the Across Connecticut Patch

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Connecticut and New Jersey added to Massachusetts COVID high-risk list for out-of-state travel

Massachusetts added two more states to its list of high-risk states for COVID-19.

Starting Saturday, people traveling to-and-from Connecticut and New Jersey will need to quarantine or get tested for coronavirus. Massachusetts was added to the high-risk lists of both states earlier this week.

There are 43 states included on the high-risk list as of Saturday.

Gov. Charlie Baker enacted a travel order on August 1 mandating all visitors and residents entering Massachusetts following a high-risk area quarantine for 14 days or produce a negative COVID-19 test result that has been administered up to 72 hours prior to arrival in Massachusetts.

Visitors are urged to obtain a negative result before traveling to Massachusetts.

Failure to comply with the order could result in a $500 fine per day.

Exemptions are allowed for travelers from lower-risk states, people commuting for work or school and patients seeking specialized medical care.

The current list of lower-risk regions includes:

  • California
  • District of Columbia
  • Hawaii
  • Maine
  • New Hampshire
  • New York
  • Vermont
  • Washington

Massachusetts residents are urged to limit any out-of-state travel only to states designated as COVID-19 lower-risk areas.

Anyone arriving from an international destination must fill out the Massachusetts Travel Form and must quarantine for 14 days or meet the 72-hour testing rule.

State health officials confirmed another 1,488 coronavirus cases on Friday — the highest single-day total since spring.

The seven-day average of positive tests ticked up to 1.9% on Friday, up from a low of .8% just last month.

The number of Massachusetts communities that have seen an average of 8 new daily cases per 100,000 residents increased to 121 on Thursday.

Related Content:

  • Connecticut, New Jersey add Massachusetts to travel advisory due to significant COVID-19 transmission; Travelers from high-risk state must provide negative test or quarantine
  • 1,488 new COVID cases in Massachusetts is the largest single-day report since spring; 23 more deaths

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3 States Added To DC’s Coronavirus Travel Quarantine List

WASHINGTON, DC — D.C. Department of Health on Monday updated its list of states deemed to be at high risk for transmitting the new coronavirus. People traveling from these 42 states to D.C. will be required to self-quarantine for 14 days when they arrive.

A state is categorized as high risk if the seven-day moving average of new cases of COVID-19, the illness associated with the new coronavirus, is 10 or more per 100,000 persons. D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser signed an executive order mandating that people traveling to and from high-risks states self-quarantine. Both Maryland and Virginia are exempt from the order.

The last time the list was updated was on Oct. 19, and the new list should be used until Monday, Nov. 16.

California, New Jersey, and Oregon were added to the list. No states were removed from the previous list for this new list.

Here are the 42 high-risk states that require 14 days of self-quarantine:

  • Alabama

  • Alaska

  • Arizona

  • Arkansas

  • California

  • Colorado

  • Connecticut

  • Delaware

  • Florida

  • Georgia

  • Idaho

  • Illinois

  • Indiana

  • Iowa

  • Kansas

  • Kentucky

  • Louisiana

  • Massachusetts

  • Michigan

  • Minnesota

  • Mississippi

  • Missouri

  • Montana

  • Nebraska

  • Nevada

  • New Jersey

  • New Mexico

  • North Carolina

  • North Dakota

  • Ohio

  • Oklahoma

  • Oregon

  • Pennsylvania

  • Rhode Island

  • South Carolina

  • South Dakota

  • Tennessee

  • Texas

  • Utah

  • West Virginia

  • Wisconsin

  • Wyoming

D.C. Health confirmed 69 new positive cases of COVID-19, the illness associated with the new coronavirus, on Monday. That’s down from the 103 cases reported on Sunday. This brings the District’s total number of positive cases to date to 17,438.

D.C. Health also reported one new death Monday due to COVID-19. The death is described as a 61-year-old man. The total number of deaths in the District stands at 647.

According to D.C. Health, 528,174 coronavirus tests have been administered in the District, 258,983 residents have been tested, and 13,443 have been cleared from isolation.

The District currently has 56 intensive care unit beds available out of 345 total intensive care unit beds. There are currently 183 in-use ventilators out of a total of 440 available. Also, there are 27 COVID-19-positive ICU patients.

Get the latest updates on the new coronavirus in D.C. as they happen. Sign up for free news alerts and a newsletter in your Patch town.

Globally, more than 46.6 million people have been infected by COVID-19, and over 1.2 million people have died, Johns Hopkins University reported Monday morning. In the United States, more than 9.2 million people have been infected and over 231,000 people have died from COVID-19.

District residents should take the following actions to help prevent the spread of COVID-19:

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.

  • Wash hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. An alcohol-based hand sanitizer can be used if soap and water are not available.

  • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.

  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.

  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.

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This article originally appeared on the Washington

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Canary Islands added to UK travel corridor list

Last-minute holidays to the Canaries will be back on sale in time for a half-term getaway after the islands were added to the UK travel corridor list.



a couple of people that are walking on the beach: Photograph: Valery Bareta/Alamy


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Valery Bareta/Alamy

Holidaymakers will be able to visit any of the eight main islands in the archipelago without the need to quarantine for 14 days on their return. The move comes into effect from 4am on Sunday (25 October), the transport Grant Shapps confirmed on Twitter on Thursday.

TUI, the UK’s largest holiday company, said it will have holidays on sale to Fuerteventura and Lanzarote from Saturday (24 October), with more flights to follow.

TUI’s managing director for UK and Ireland, Andrew Flintham, described the addition of its most popular winter sun destination to the safe list as “a positive step forward”.

“We haven’t been able to take people to the Canary Islands for 89 days, when the sudden quarantine and subsequent travel advice was imposed with little notice. We’re therefore delighted that UK flights will now resume from Saturday.”

The operator will also have twice-weekly flights to St Lucia and Cuba over the winter, starting from Sunday.

Adventure company Explore Worldwide said it will now increase the number of small group trips it runs to Gran Canaria, Lanzarote, Tenerife and La Gomera over the winter. Managing director John Telfer said that as well as being great news for travellers, the opening up of the islands was “a much-needed shot in the arm for all our hoteliers and guides in the Canaries”.

The Maldives, the Greek island of Mykonos and Denmark were also added to the travel corridor list which already included Greece, Gibraltar, Sweden and Germany. However, the German government has placed the whole of the UK into a high-alert category, meaning anyone arriving from the UK has to quarantine on arrival into Germany, from 11.01am on Friday; and the UK is on Denmark’s list of banned countries.

A spokesman for the Association of British Travel Agents described the announcement by Shapps as “a bit of light at the end of a very dark tunnel for the travel industry”, but stressed that the pandemic had brought foreign travel to a standstill leaving companies “facing difficult decisions around jobs in the weeks ahead”.

Paul Charles of the PC Agency, who has been campaigning for affordable airport testing for months, agreed the outlook for travel over the winter is “harsh”.

“We’re looking at a cruel six months for travel anywhere. Share prices [in travel companies] have fallen; capacity has been cut by airlines; more businesses will fail and more staff will be made redundant. The short-term outlook is harsh – that’s why we need effective testing,” he said.

Airlines are currently operating at less than a third of their usual capacity. BA announced more cuts to its flights on 22 October. It will fly no more than 30% of its timetabled flights for the rest of the year, after it reported a £1.17bn loss for the period from

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Canary Islands added to UK’s safe travel list

Playa De Las Teresitas in Tenerife
Playa De Las Teresitas in Tenerife

UK tourists seeking winter sun have been given a boost, after Spain’s Canary Islands and the Greek island of Mykonos were added to the government’s safe travel list.

It means visitors will no longer need to quarantine for 14 days on their return, with the Maldives and Denmark also deemed safe.

The changes apply to anyone arriving in the UK after 04:00 BST on Sunday.

But Lichtenstein has been taken off the list, meaning arrivals must isolate.

The changes apply to citizens from England, Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales. The Foreign Office still advises British nationals against all but essential international travel due to the pandemic.

Winter sun

The Canary Islands are popular with winter holidaymakers, being one of the few parts of Europe warm enough for beach holidays during that time.

However, the rest of Spain, including the Balearic Islands, remains exempt from the safe travel list amid a surge in infections.

Mykonos and the Maldives, the Indian Ocean, are also widely visited during autumn and winter.

But the Maldives will continue to require all visitors to prove they have had a negative Covid test within 96 hours of arrival.

Meanwhile, Denmark says anyone from the UK – which it deems high risk – must show they have a “worthy purpose” for visiting, such as work or study. Tourism is not permitted unless you have a second home in the country.

The Department for Transport said the new additions to the safe list had seen a decrease in confirmed cases of coronavirus.

However, it said there had been “a significant change in both the level and pace of confirmed cases of coronavirus in Liechtenstein” leading to it being removed from the current list of travel corridors.

Analysis box by Tom Burridge, transport correspondent
Analysis box by Tom Burridge, transport correspondent

After so much doom and gloom, travel companies can suddenly see the sunshine. The Canaries are a key destination for UK airlines and tour operators.

And it is not an exaggeration to say that the removal of the quarantine will help these companies make it through the winter.

The government has, in effect, dialled-up the tourism “on switch”.

However it will be a real test case for whether, in these uncertain Covid times, there is demand for travel.

With plenty of time for people to make winter bookings it’s a timely moment.

British Airways recently scheduled a direct flight to the Maldives, so maybe they knew something we didn’t.

Travel companies, which have seen demand slump due to the quarantine rules, welcomed the decision on the Canaries.

“The Canaries are a hugely important market for winter travel – representing over 50% of bookings for some tour operators – so this is very welcome news for the whole sector,” said industry body Airlines UK.

Andrew Flintham, managing director of TUI, said the holiday operator had not been able to take people on a holiday to the Canaries for 89 days.

“We’re therefore delighted that UK flights will now resume

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Would you like added peace of mind with your hotel room? That will be $30 please

“It doesn’t seem like a good idea to me,” said Jan Jones, coordinator for hospitality and tourism management at the University of New Haven. “I understand that hotels are going to have to recoup some of the extra costs involved in cleaning. To me, it’s sort of like saying, ‘Yes, it’s pretty clean, but if you want it really clean it’s going to cost you more.’”

Currently, the Yotel Boston, which is located in the Seaport neighborhood and where rooms start at around $100, is the only hotel in the chain using this particular robot. These robots, produced by a Danish company called UVD Robots, also roam the terminals at Heathrow in London to clean surfaces and the air. For a Yotel stay, the robot must be booked prior to arrival, and yes, it costs $25 or $30 to have the robot come into your room for the extra layer of clean.

Anthony Melchiorri, creator of the television show “Hotel Impossible” and founder of the hotel management and consultancy group Argeo Hospitality, said the add-on robot layer of protection almost gives the appearance of a hotel asking “Would you like a fire extinguisher in your room?” or “Would you like a room with a sprinkler system?” for an up-charge.

“It feels like a counterintuitive move,” Melchiorri said. “This is a time when hotels need to be drawing customers back, and no one likes an extra charge.”

To be clear, the rooms at the Yotel are subject to the same upgraded cleaning protocols that major hotels around the world have adopted to keep patrons safe from COVID-19. Within the hotel, high-touch surfaces are frequently wiped down, hand sanitizers are abundant, and masks and social distancing are required when guests are not in their rooms.

Trish Berry, general manager of Yotel Boston, said in a release that it’s important that the hospitality industry do everything it can to reassure travelers. When not cleaning rooms for an additional charge, Vi-Yo-Let whirls through and cleans common spaces in the hotel.

The Vi-Yo-Let UV robot at the Yotel in Boston. For an additional charge, guests can have the robot blast their room with UV light before arrival to kill germs.
The Vi-Yo-Let UV robot at the Yotel in Boston. For an additional charge, guests can have the robot blast their room with UV light before arrival to kill germs.Brian Samuels

UVD Robots, which is renting the robots to Yotel, claims its robots are able to disinfect pretty much anything you point them at — each robot has a mobile array of powerful short wavelength ultraviolet-C (UVC) lights that emit enough energy to literally shred the DNA or RNA of any microorganisms that have the misfortune of being exposed to them.

The company’s robots, which are a bit like bright, disinfecting Roombas, first found popularity in hospitals, but they jumped to the hospitality sector after the pandemic arrived earlier this year. Yotel is one of many hotel chains trying new technologies to win back guests who abandoned travel in record numbers since the start of the pandemic.

The Westin Houston Medical Center, Waldorf Astoria Beverly Hills, and the Beverly Hilton are using similar UV

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