Tag: 14day

Newsom urges Californians not to travel out of state, advises 14-day quarantine for those who do

SACRAMENTO — As California sees the fastest rate of growth in coronavirus cases since the start of the pandemic, Gov. Gavin Newsom announced Friday an advisory urging anyone traveling to California or returning from out of state to quarantine for two weeks.

The advisory is voluntary, not mandatory. It comes as several Bay Area counties are moving to shut down or restrict indoor dining and other activities to try to quell the rising number of cases, and as many Americans are preparing to travel for the Thanksgiving holiday.

The travel advisory issued by the California Department of Public Health encourages Californians to stay home and avoid nonessential travel to other states and countries.

Travelers arriving in California, including residents returning home from trips, should quarantine for 14 days, the state said. During that time, they should limit their interactions to their immediate households.

“California just surpassed a sobering threshold — 1 million COVID-19 cases — with no signs of the virus slowing down,” Newsom said in a statement. “Travel increases the risk of spreading COVID-19, and we must all collectively increase our efforts at this time to keep the virus at bay and save lives.”

California is reporting the fastest weekly rate of growth in coronavirus case since the pandemic began, state health officer Dr. Erica Pan said Friday. Cases grew 47% the first week of November — a steeper rise than the 39% jump the third week of June, when the summer surge was taking off. The daily average of new coronavirus cases in California is nearing 7,000, about twice as many as a month ago. Hospitalizations and ICU admissions related to COVID-19 are also rising, each increasing about 34% over the last two weeks, Pan said.

“The peak will be even higher (than the previous July peak) if we don’t act,” Pan said.

Nationally, the U.S. is breaking records daily for new infections, averaging more than 134,000 cases a day over the last week — a 72% increase from two weeks earlier, according to The New York Times.

The Bay Area is faring better than most major U.S. metropolitan areas. But even here, coronavirus cases started ticking up in mid-October, and began a steeper and more concerning climb the first week of November.

On Friday, Contra Costa and Santa Clara counties announced plans to close indoor dining Tuesday. They join San Francisco, which earlier this week said it would halt indoor dining starting Friday and pause school reopenings. Marin County this week asked restaurants to voluntarily reduce indoor dining capacity from 50% to 25%.

“It’s absolutely imperative we take action now, each and every one of us, in order to get through this,” Santa Clara County Health Officer Dr. Sara Cody said at a press conference Friday announcing the new restrictions.

Santa Clara next week will move back from the orange to the red tier in the state’s reopening structure, indicating the virus is spreading more quickly. That will mean that indoor fitness centers will operate at 10%

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California, Oregon and Washington issue Covid travel advisory urging 14-day quarantine

  • The governors of California, Oregon and Washington issued a joint coronavirus travel advisory on Friday urging people arriving to their states to self-quarantine for 14 days.
  • The West Coast states also advised people to avoid non-essential out-of-state travel.
  • The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warns that traveling can increase someone’s chance of spreading and becoming infected with the coronavirus.



a person sitting in a car: A masked passenger is seen seated on a flight from San Francisco, California to Newark, New Jersey on October 27, 2020.


© Provided by CNBC
A masked passenger is seen seated on a flight from San Francisco, California to Newark, New Jersey on October 27, 2020.

The governors of California, Oregon and Washington issued a joint coronavirus travel advisory on Friday urging people arriving to their states to self-quarantine for 14 days and asking residents to avoid all non-essential out-of-state trips.

The Pacific Northwest states said essential travel includes people who are traveling for “work and study, critical infrastructure support, economic services and supply chains, health, immediate medical care and safety and security,” according to a statement.

The Democratic governors also recommended that travelers limit their interactions with only people in their households.

“California just surpassed a sobering threshold – one million COVID-19 cases – with no signs of the virus slowing down,” California Gov. Gavin Newsom said in a statement. “Increased cases are adding pressure on our hospital systems and threatening the lives of seniors, essential workers and vulnerable Californians. Travel increases the risk of spreading COVID-19, and we must all collectively increase our efforts at this time to keep the virus at bay and save lives.”

The travel advisory is voluntary, according to Newsom’s office, which sent out a statement saying the best enforcement is “encouraging others to be respectable and be responsible by taking action. Asking people to do the right thing is the most powerful enforcement tool we have.”

Friday’s travel warning comes as families across the country modify their holiday plans and university students plan their return trips home amid a surge of Covid-19 cases in nearly every corner of the U.S.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo told reporters on a call late last week that the state would ramp up enforcement at its airports during the holiday season to ensure arriving travelers follow quarantine and testing requirements.

Cuomo said he plans to send in more National Guard to help enforce the state’s travel advisory, adding that he spoke with New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio about increasing the New York City Police Department’s presence as well.

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warns that traveling can increase someone’s chance of spreading and becoming infected with the coronavirus. The safest option is to stay home, the CDC’s guidance says.

When it comes to traveling by air, people should be aware that the risk isn’t limited to sitting on the plane alone, said Keri Althoff, an associate professor in the department of epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, during a media call Thursday.

Althoff cautioned that standing in line, especially if travelers are less than 6 feet away

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China exempt from Hong Kong’s new 14-day hotel quarantine

Nov. 3 (UPI) — Hong Kong is requiring all overseas travelers to quarantine at a hotel for 14 days, with the exception of mainland China, after a mainland Chinese woman tested positive for the coronavirus in Hong Kong on Sunday.

The government of Hong Kong said the 14-day hotel quarantine is mandatory for all visitors, with the exception of people coming from the Chinese mainland, the special administrative region of Macau and Taiwan, the South China Morning Post reported Tuesday.

Starting Nov. 13, all other travelers will be required to show proof of a room reservation at a Hong Kong hotel. Before the policy goes into effect, arrivals can still quarantine at home for two weeks.

“We wanted to tighten the quarantine measures due to the worsening COVID-19 situation globally,” said Chuang Shuk-kwan, a physician and head of the disease branch of Hong Kong’s Center for Health Protection. “In the past, there were a few cases [of people who] infected other family members while they were quarantining at home.”

Hong Kong’s confirmed cases now stand at 5,345, lower than most neighboring countries but still higher than Taiwan, which has recorded only 564 cases of COVID-19 since the beginning of the pandemic.

China reported 86,070 cases on Tuesday, but the country is being exempted from the hotel quarantine requirement at a time when Hong Kong authorities have been curbing pro-democracy protests.

A cluster of infections at Hong Kong’s Mui Wo beach resort hotel has been traced to a Chinese national who tested positive on Sunday, the Hong Kong Free Press reported.

The woman, identified as a 42-year-old sex worker, is facing deportation after reportedly gaining illegal entry into Hong Kong, where police are tracking down about 100 clients who had contact with the woman, according to Hong Kong news service HK01.

On Tuesday Chinese leader Xi Jinping said uncertainties face China, as well as “shocks and challenges,” during a meeting of the Chinese Communist Party’s Central Committee.

Last month Xi stressed the importance of integrating Hong Kong to the mainland on the 40th anniversary of the establishment of the Shenzhen special economic zone.

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N.J. sticks with 14-day quarantine travel advisory for coronavirus hot spots despite N.Y.’s rule change

New Jersey doesn’t plan to scrap its travel advisory calling for a 14-day quarantine for those arriving from coronavirus hot spots despite the announcement over the weekend that New York was ending its list and instead will require visitors from non-neighboring states to take a COVID-19 test, Gov. Phil Murphy said Monday.

Both states, along with Connecticut, have maintained a joint travel advisory for states with high COVID-19 infection rates. But New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced Saturday it was dropping its list as coronavirus numbers continue to rise across the country.

New York is now requiring travelers from all non-neighboring states to test negative no more than three days before they enter. Those who arrive without proof of a negative test won’t be stopped from entering but will be required to quarantine for 14 days.

Even those who test negative will have to quarantine for three days after they arrive and then take a second test. If that’s also negative, they can cease their quarantine.

Cuomo admitted Saturday it had become increasingly difficult to enforce the travel advisory.

“The list started small and then the list got longer and longer and longer,” he said. “At one point, it was no longer a list, it was all-inclusive. Now, you don’t have a list.”

But Murphy said Monday there are no plans to make a similar change in New Jersey.

“We’re gonna stay with the current posture that we’ve got,” the governor said during his latest online coronavirus briefing.

Murphy stressed that the advisory does not apply to people who are crossing into neighboring states like Connecticut, Delaware, New York, and Pennsylvania for work or other essential reasons.

But he emphasized that people shouldn’t travel unless it’s necessary.

“We’re just asking people if you don’t have to travel, just flat out don’t travel. Period,” he said.

Things got awkward in New Jersey last month when New Jersey met the criteria to qualify for its own advisory. The Garden State has recorded 16 straight days of more than 1,000 new cases.

While violators of New York’s advisory have faced a possible $2,000 fine, New Jersey has never established fines. Instead, Murphy and other officials have asked people to practice “personal responsibility” and follow the order.

There are currently 41 states and territories on the quarantine list. Neighboring states — New York, Pennsylvania, and Delaware — are exempt from being on the list despite meeting the criteria.

New Jersey on Monday reported 1,379 more COVID-19 cases and three additional deaths. The state’s hospitals had more than 1,000 patients with confirmed or suspected COVID-19 cases for the sixth straight day, and the statewide rate of transmission decreased slightly to 1.28, but it remains above the key mark indicating the outbreak here is growing.

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Brent Johnson may be reached at [email protected].

Matt Arco may be reached at [email protected].

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