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Italy to adopt travel ban within country during holiday season

The prime minister of Italy announced the country will enter an extended period of strict lockdowns to slow the spread of COVID-19.

Speaking to Italian citizens on Thursday evening, Italian Prime Minister Giuseppe Conte said, “It’s clear this will be a Christmas that is different from others,” adding that officials in the country will ban travel through the nation over the holiday season.

The travel ban within the country’s 20 regions will begin on Dec. 21 and last through Jan. 6. The prime minister urged residents of the country to cancel holiday plans, arguing the precaution would help mitigate the spread of the coronavirus.

Conte made the announcement on the same day that Italian health officials recorded the highest number of total deaths in a day, 993 people, eclipsing March 27, when 919 died from complications arising from the disease.

Conte said that although the holiday season will be unlike any other, it would still be “no less authentic” than holidays past.

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Lyndhurst holiday lighting event is Dec. 4; Santa will travel the streets of Mayfield Heights Dec. 12, South Euclid Dec. 13

SOUTH EUCLID, Ohio — Because residents can’t come to see Santa Claus at South Euclid city hall this year, Santa will come to the residents.

The city, as a way of bringing holiday cheer to residents, will hold its first “South Euclid Holiday Parade” from 2-4 p.m. Dec. 13. “We’ve mapped out a route throughout the city we think will reach the majority of residents,” said Community Development Coordinator Daniel Subwick. “Santa Claus and a couple of his holiday pals in costume will be going down many of our streets and they will be passing out gifts to residents as they pass by. There will be a special treat for the first 100 residents.

“The parade will be going through most neighborhoods in the city, but we’re not able to go down every street.”

Subwick said that residents, as the Santa parade passes, are asked to follow safety measures, including social distancing, as they gather on sidewalks.

“We want to thank the police department for providing an escort, and the fire department for the truck that will be participating in the parade. Mayor (Georgine) Welo intends to be part of the parade.”

The city, since 2013, has annually held a holiday lighting event outside city hall, featuring singers, live reindeer, a visit from Santa, and more.

“We weren’t able to have an outdoor event this year (because of the pandemic), so we turned on the (holiday) lights at city hall on Monday (Nov. 30),” Subwick said. “City hall is now lit up, so residents can stop by and, if they’d like, takes photos.”

Subwick said that the parade’s route will soon be posted on the city’s Facebook and Instagram pages.

“It should be a fun event, come rain or shine,” Subwick said. “Santa will be here to keep alive the holiday spirit.”

Lyndhurst

The city of Lyndhurst will hold its annual lighting ceremony and food drive from 7-8 p.m. Dec. 4 behind city hall, 5301 Mayfield Road, in Lyndhurst Park.

A “Candy Cane Lane” has been set up in the park that will feature a visit from Santa Claus, who will be stationed at the park’s gazebo. Visitors are invited to take a photo in front of Santa, but should remember to remain properly distanced. Candy Cane Lane will remain open to visitors throughout the holiday season.

Those attending the lighting event are also invited to the Lyndhurst Community Center patio, at 1341 Parkview Drive, located at the northern end of the park, for hot chocolate and individually wrapped cookies.

During the lighting event, the Daisy Girl Scout Troop No. 71762 will continue its holiday food drive benefitting the Greater Cleveland Food Bank. The goal is to reach 1,000 pounds of donated food. Among items sought are sweets, including candy, pudding mix, cookies and cake mixes; stuffing mix; canned cranberry sauce; packets of chicken or turkey gravy mix; and canned sweet potatoes or yams.

Donations can be made, 24 hours per day, seven days per week, in the drop box

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The Office Or Parks And Recreation Quiz: Who Said It

Whenever you think of any NBC shows to watch, the two most common shows that come up are The Office and Parks and Rec, both produced by legendary TV producer Micheal Schur. The man is a genius for creating both of these incredible, thought-provoking shows. From hilarious insight into the suffocating grey aura of a typical American workplace to their goofy characters.

Running these weird offices of Scranton and Pawnee are the unique and polar opposite bosses Michael Scott and Ron Swanson. Michael loves his job and tries hard to be a better boss every day, considers the office as a family and worries for his employees’ happiness, but his stupidity, insensitivity and completely offensive behaviour only aggravates them. While Ron Swanson is the complete opposite and couldn’t care less about what his employees do and he may run the department, but seems to do the least work often talking about how corrupt the government is, even though he works for the same.

But what connects these two iconic TV characters is the love from fans, whether you laugh at Michael’s downright erroneous cringey misquotes or simply giggle over Swanson’s comments on manliness or his kooky love for food. Can you tell these two archetypal bosses apart from their quotes alone?

Answers are at the end!

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Data show Americans couldn’t resist Thanksgiving travel

Americans couldn’t resist the urge to gather for Thanksgiving, driving only slightly less than a year ago and largely ignoring the pleas of public health experts, who begged them to forgo holiday travel to help contain the COVID-19 pandemic, data from roadways and airports show.

The nation’s unwillingness to tamp down on travel offered a warning in advance of Christmas and New Year’s as virus deaths and hospitalizations hit new highs a week after Thanksgiving. U.S. deaths from the outbreak eclipsed 3,100 on Thursday, obliterating the single-day record set last spring.

Vehicle travel in early November was as much as 20% lower than a year earlier, but it surged around the holiday and peaked on Thanksgiving Day at only about 5% less than the pandemic-free period in 2019, according to StreetLight Data, which provided an analysis to the Associated Press.

“People were less willing to change their behavior than any other day during the pandemic,” said Laura Schewel, founder of StreetLight Data.

Airports also saw some of their busiest days of the pandemic, though air travel was much lower than last year. The Transportation Security Administration screened more than 1 million passengers on four separate days during the Thanksgiving travel period. Since the pandemic gutted travel in March, there has been only one other day when the number of travelers topped 1 million — Oct. 18.

“If only a small percentage of those travelers were asymptomatically infected, this can translate into hundreds of thousands of additional infections moving from one community to another,” Dr. Cindy Friedman, a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention official, said this week during a briefing.

Wide swaths of the country saw a sudden influx of people arriving from university campuses in the days leading up to the holiday, according to a data visualization of anonymous cellphone data from a firm called Tectonix.

The CDC has urged people to stay home for the holidays, but officials acknowledged that many people would not heed that advice and advised them to get tested before and after trips. Friedman said that this year’s holidays presented “tough choices” for many families.

The travelers included some elected officials who preached against trips. The mayors of Denver and Austin, Texas, faced fierce backlashes for traveling after telling other people to stay home.

Others had no regrets. Trananda Graves, who runs a travel planning company in Keller, Texas, took a Thanksgiving road trip with her family to Nashville. It was a chance for her daughter to connect with relatives as they shared recipes, and Graves said everyone’s mood was uplifted.

“It was just a break to get away from home,” Graves said. “We work at home, we go to school at home.”

She decided to drive to meet extended family after seeing that flights were crowded and said her family followed guidance to avoid spreading infections.

But infections, even from small Thanksgiving gatherings, have begun to stream in around the country, adding another burden to health departments that are already overwhelmed.

“This uptick

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Data shows Americans couldn’t resist Thanksgiving travel

FILE - In this Nov. 25, 2020, file photo, air travelers line up to go through a a security checkpoint at Salt Lake City International Airport in Salt Lake City. Data from roadways and airports shows millions could not resist the urge to gather on Thanksgiving, even during a pandemic.

FILE – In this Nov. 25, 2020, file photo, air travelers line up to go through a a security checkpoint at Salt Lake City International Airport in Salt Lake City. Data from roadways and airports shows millions could not resist the urge to gather on Thanksgiving, even during a pandemic.

AP

Americans couldn’t resist the urge to gather for Thanksgiving, driving only slightly less than a year ago and largely ignoring the pleas of public health experts, who begged them to forgo holiday travel to help contain the coronavirus pandemic, data from roadways and airports shows.

The nation’s unwillingness to tamp down on travel offered a warning in advance of Christmas and New Year’s as virus deaths and hospitalizations hit new highs a week after Thanksgiving. U.S. deaths from the outbreak eclipsed 3,100 on Thursday, obliterating the single-day record set last spring.

Vehicle travel in early November was as much as 20% lower than a year earlier, but it surged around the holiday and peaked on Thanksgiving Day at only about 5% less than the pandemic-free period in 2019, according to StreetLight Data, which provided an analysis to The Associated Press.

“People were less willing to change their behavior than any other day during the pandemic,” said Laura Schewel, founder of StreetLight Data.

Airports also saw some of their busiest days of the pandemic, though air travel was much lower than last year. The Transportation Security Administration screened more than 1 million passengers on four separate days during the Thanksgiving travel period. Since the pandemic gutted travel in March, there has been only one other day when the number of travelers topped 1 million — Oct. 18.

“If only a small percentage of those travelers were asymptomatically infected, this can translate into hundreds of thousands of additional infections moving from one community to another,” Dr. Cindy Friedman, a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention official, said this week during a briefing.

Wide swaths of the country saw a sudden influx of people arriving from university campuses in the days leading up to the holiday, according to a data visualization of anonymous cellphone data from a firm called Tectonix.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has urged people to stay home for the holidays, but officials acknowledged that many people would not heed that advice and advised them to get tested before and after trips. Friedman said that this year’s holidays presented “tough choices” for many families.

The travelers included some elected officials who preached against trips. The mayors of Denver and Austin, Texas, faced fierce backlashes for traveling after telling other people to stay home.

Others had no regrets. Trananda Graves, who runs a travel-planning company in Keller, Texas, took a Thanksgiving road trip with her family to Nashville, Tennessee. It was a chance for her daughter to connect with relatives as they shared recipes, and Graves said everyone’s mood was uplifted.

“It was just a break to get away from home,” Graves said.

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Airlines try to thread the needle as CDC warns against holiday travel

The airline and travel industry are wrestling with how to promote their struggling sectors in the run-up to the usually-busy Thanksgiving holiday, against the backdrop of stern new CDC recommendations released Thursday warning to avoid travel as coronavirus cases spiral uncontrolled.



a group of people sitting at a airport: A passenger carries her luggage through a nearly deserted terminal at the Tampa International Airport in Florida.


© Chris O’Meara/AP Photo
A passenger carries her luggage through a nearly deserted terminal at the Tampa International Airport in Florida.

“CDC is recommending against travel during the Thanksgiving period,” Henry Walke, the CDC’s Covid-19 incident manager, said during a briefing Thursday, adding that the health agency is especially concerned about “transportation hubs.”

The agency’s recommendation lines up with a growing number of new state restrictions and warnings in response to record numbers of new cases and more than 250,000 U.S. deaths, as well as disease experts’ concerns that even small indoor gatherings of people from different locations could spread the virus further.

Thanksgiving is typically a banner time of year for the airline industry, which has seen rock bottom revenues in 2020. While the volume of travelers will be much less than in previous years, air carriers have still been hoping for a healthy uptick.

During a press conference held a week ago, Nick Calio, CEO of Airlines for America, said “I hope you’re flying somewhere” for Thanksgiving. “I am,” he continued.

“Flying is safe, I will state that categorically,” Calio said.

But by Thursday, as Covid cases and spread spiked ever higher, Calio had adopted a more cautious tone, though he still insisted the risk of being infected on board a plane is low. On a joint holiday travel call with TSA, Calio said airlines want travelers to “make an informed decision.”

He suggested they look to research like a recent Harvard study that found that with a layered approach — including social distancing, masks and air filtration — the risk of coronavirus transmission aboard a plane is low.

Several additional studies have found the same, although the science is far from settled and other researchers have found suspected cases of transmission on board planes.

The mood was more grim at a U.S. Travel Association press conference later in the day. “We’re in an unprecedented and dangerous time,” said Michael Parkinson, a doctor who serves on an advisory panel for the group.

Roger Dow, the association’s president, said “I’d rather have a little less travel now to come back more quickly down the road.” However, the 74-year-old Dow said he himself will be traveling from Florida to Maryland for Thanksgiving.

TSA chief David Pekoske repeatedly side-stepped questions about whether the agency would discourage holiday travel, saying travelers should “make their own decisions.”

“The decision to travel is up to the traveler,” he said. “And my best advice to the traveler is to consider the recommendations that the Centers for Disease Control have made, that their local public health officials have made and any consultations that they think are appropriate with their own physicians.”

TSA expects to see travel volumes that are consistent with the Columbus Day weekend,

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Buried trash at UTA construction site uncovers glimpse of 19th century rail travel

Buried trash at UTA construction site uncovers glimpse of 19th century rail travel

(Photo courtesy of Utah Transit Authority) Examples of artifacts found in a buried trash pile at the construction site of a new UTA facility offer a glimpse into what 19th century railroads used.

Finding a pile of trash on your property may not seem like reason for excitement. But discovery of one buried at the downtown Salt Lake City site of a new Utah Transit Authority bus maintenance facility is delighting archeologists.

Crews installing a storm drain unearthed a “midden” — a fancy word for trash pile — full of artifacts from trains used as long ago as the 19th century, when the site was a maintenance shop for the Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad between the mid-1880s to the late 1950s.
“I have a sneaking suspicion these are the contents of a passenger car,” said Christopher Merritt, historic preservation officer for the Utah Division of State History. They include fully intact bottles and ceramic pottery, plus plates and even a soap dish.

“Sort of like a movie theater, once the movie was over, the crew went in and cleaned out all the trash and these items were deposited. That’s really unique,” he said. “I can’t think of any other similar discovery in the United States of what a passenger experience would have been like on the Denver & Rio Grande Western Railroad in the 19th century.”

(Photo courtesy of Utah Transit Authority) Examples of artifacts found in a buried trash pile at the construction site of a new UTA facility that offer a glimpse into what 19th century railroads used.

UTA said in a news release that when Big D Construction crews made the find during work on its new Depot District Fuels Technology Center, they notified the state. Archeologists and crews have been mapping the area where the artifacts were deposited, nestled against a long concrete foundation with embedded rails.

“Several of the bottles were still corked and had contents in them, what looks like whiskey or other hard liquor in the bottles, which is kind of a cool time capsule in itself,” Merritt said.

He adds that it’s impossible to say whether the artifacts will be the only ones found on the construction.

(Photo courtesy of Utah Transit Authority) Historical photo of Denver & Rio Grande Western maintenance shop that once stood where a new UTA bus facility is being built.

“In this area we’re just learning about this really cool railroad history. What was it like to ride in a passenger train dining car in the 19th century? What were they drinking and eating? This kind of discovery is our only window into the past,” Merritt said.

He praised the construction crews who made the discovery.

“The operators on the ground are experienced. They’re highly skilled. They know what doesn’t feel right when they’re digging with a back hoe,”

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Data shows Americans couldn’t resist Thanksgiving travel

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — Americans couldn’t resist the urge to gather for Thanksgiving, driving only slightly less than a year ago and largely ignoring the pleas of public health experts, who begged them to forgo holiday travel to help contain the coronavirus pandemic, data from roadways and airports shows.



FILE - In this Nov. 25, 2020, file photo, air travelers line up to go through a a security checkpoint at Salt Lake City International Airport in Salt Lake City. Data from roadways and airports shows millions could not resist the urge to gather on Thanksgiving, even during a pandemic. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)


© Provided by Associated Press
FILE – In this Nov. 25, 2020, file photo, air travelers line up to go through a a security checkpoint at Salt Lake City International Airport in Salt Lake City. Data from roadways and airports shows millions could not resist the urge to gather on Thanksgiving, even during a pandemic. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)

The nation’s unwillingness to tamp down on travel offered a warning in advance of Christmas and New Year’s as virus deaths and hospitalizations hit new highs a week after Thanksgiving. U.S. deaths from the outbreak eclipsed 3,100 on Thursday, obliterating the single-day record set last spring.

Vehicle travel in early November was as much as 20% lower than a year earlier, but it surged around the holiday and peaked on Thanksgiving Day at only about 5% less than the pandemic-free period in 2019, according to StreetLight Data, which provided an analysis to The Associated Press.

“People were less willing to change their behavior than any other day during the pandemic,” said Laura Schewel, founder of StreetLight Data.

Airports also saw some of their busiest days of the pandemic, though air travel was much lower than last year. The Transportation Security Administration screened more than 1 million passengers on four separate days during the Thanksgiving travel period. Since the pandemic gutted travel in March, there has been only one other day when the number of travelers topped 1 million — Oct. 18.



FILE - In this Nov. 24, 2020, file photo, air travelers arriving at Midway Airport in Chicago are reminded of the city's COVID-19 travel orders. Data from roadways and airports shows millions could not resist the urge to gather on Thanksgiving, even during a pandemic. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast, File)


© Provided by Associated Press
FILE – In this Nov. 24, 2020, file photo, air travelers arriving at Midway Airport in Chicago are reminded of the city’s COVID-19 travel orders. Data from roadways and airports shows millions could not resist the urge to gather on Thanksgiving, even during a pandemic. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast, File)

“If only a small percentage of those travelers were asymptomatically infected, this can translate into hundreds of thousands of additional infections moving from one community to another,” Dr. Cindy Friedman, a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention official, said this week during a briefing.

Wide swaths of the country saw a sudden influx of people arriving from university campuses in the days leading up to the holiday, according to a data visualization of anonymous cellphone data from a firm called Tectonix.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has urged people to stay home for the holidays, but officials acknowledged that many people would not heed that advice and advised them to get tested before and after trips. Friedman said that this year’s holidays presented “tough choices” for many families.

The travelers included some elected officials who preached against trips. The mayors of Denver and Austin, Texas, faced fierce backlashes for traveling after telling other

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Rico Nasty Drops Debut Album ‘Nightmare Vacation’

For longtime Rico Nasty fans, today is a global holiday of sorts thanks to the release of the genreless artist’s debut studio album Nightmare Vacation.

As Nasty explained during a recent in-depth chat with Zane Lowe for Apple Music, much of this album was written and recorded during a time in her life where her personal confidence wasn’t dialed up to its usual level of 10. She attributed this to both the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and “growing up,” though the ultimate result was a fresh sense of pride in the self.

“That’s why I named it Nightmare Vacation because all the shit that I was scared of at one point, scared to do and scared to say, it just became my second nature,” Nasty told Lowe. “I want to say that shit. I don’t care if I hurt somebody’s feelings. I’m going to wear it. I don’t care if I get dirty looks … Nightmare Vacation is really just about being yourself, your truest self, going through things that people tell you you can’t get out of and getting out of them, coming out a rockstar.”

The album touches on virtually every aspect of what makes Rico Nasty such a compelling artist, building its sonic peaks across a wide range of production from 100 gecs, Kenny Beats, Take a Daytrip, and more.

“I heard about 100 gecs from my A&R,” Nasty told Lowe of her introduction to the acclaimed brand of pop made possible by the duo of Dylan Brady and Laura Les. “I’m always asking him to put me on to weird sounding shit. I was looking for something. I like ear orgasms.”

Stream Nightmare Vacation, featuring appearances by Gucci Mane and more, below via Spotify.

Moments before the album dropped, Nasty hosted a live YouTube event dubbed Sometimes You Have to Tell People to Shut the F*ck Up.

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Panel to discuss disability sport and recreation in COVID-19

The panel will feature a discussion that focuses on what the rebuild of disability sport and recreation may look like in Victoria and what role sporting organisations can play in this new, post-COVID world.

The discussion will be hosted by diversity and inclusion specialist, Rana Hussain, and features lived experience of disability.

Our speakers:

  • Matthew Haanappel – Diversity & Inclusion Coordinator, Active Monash
  • Ned Brewer-Maiga – Community Assistant – Social Inclusion, Hawthorn Football Club
  • Sarah Anderson – Chair, Disability Sport & Recreation
  • Libby Mears – CEO, Leisure Network

Attendees will learn how their organisation can support people with disability to actively engage with sport and recreation in 2021, with practical strategies and examples on how to do this.

After a challenging year, DSR CEO Richard Amon said it would be refreshing to look at how the sector can collectively work together to get more people with disability physically active in 2021.

“We’ve all had the experience of missing out on community sport during the COVID-19 pandemic. People with disability, however, are particularly at risk of being left behind in the return to sport.

“It is up to us to work together to remove the barriers that prevent participation.

“We have worked with our partners to develop a range of resources that support organisations who work in the sport and recreation sector to meaningfully engage people with disability and change the narrative moving forward.

“This is even more timely given that 2021 is a Paralympics year. We hope this panel discussion will get you thinking outside the box about how you can create a better future for all Victorians.”

VicHealth Physical Activity and Sport Manager, Chris Lacey, said sporting organisations will play a key role in supporting people with disability to reconnect with their community in the coronavirus recovery.

“It’s been great to support Disability Sport & Recreation to bring this expert panel together,” he said.

“This panel will provide sporting organisations with practical information and examples on how to ensure Victorians with disability can participate in sport and physical activity in 2021 and into the future.”

This panel is presented as the first session of the 2020 Victorian Disability Sport and Recreation Festival – a unique community event that promotes and celebrates physically active lifestyles for people with disability.

This year the festival is going virtual – with interactive sessions, videos, Q&As and special panels all aimed at engaging people with disability and those who support them.

We encourage everyone that attends the panel discussion to stay on the festival platform and watch the official opening speeches, including a message from Dr Sandro Demaio, CEO VicHealth.

This panel is free to attend but registration is required to access the festival platform.

Register now to access the festival and attend the panel

When: Friday 11 December 2020

Time: 8:00am – 8:50am

/Public Release. The material in this public release comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here.
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