Day: November 7, 2020

N.J. man, 26, found shot to death in hotel parking lot near Newark Airport

A 26-year-old Union County man was found shot to death Friday night in the parking lot of a hotel near Newark Airport, authorities said.

Patrick Shukla, of Elizabeth, was found by police in the lot of Country Inn & Suites by Radisson on International Boulevard, according to Acting Union County Prosecutor Lyndsay V. Ruotolo and the Elizabeth Police Department.

Police were called to the area shortly before midnight and found Shukla seriously wounded. He was pronounced dead at the scene, Ruotolo said.

Anyone with information about the crime is asked to call Elizabeth Police Detective Carrie Scharpnick at 908-558-2069 or Union County Prosecutor’s Office Detective Sean Holcomb at 908-358-8377.

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Anthony G. Attrino may be reached at [email protected] Follow him on Twitter @TonyAttrino. Find NJ.com on Facebook.

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Police investigating shots fired in Blooming Grove hotel parking lot

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Elvis Santana/freeimages.com

BLOOMING GROVE, Wis. — Police are investigating shots that were fired in the Magnuson Grand Hotel parking lot around 2:50 a.m. on Saturday.

A large gathering in the hotel’s parking lot at 3510 Millpond Rd was taking place as police received reports of shots being fired. Police discovered around 30 shell casings in the parking lot afterwards.

Many vehicles were seen leaving the area, but whether any suspects have been identified is unknown. Police are still investigating this incident and urge with information to contact the Dane County Sheriff’s Office.

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Ridgewood hotel project offers attractive returns


Ridgewood hotel project offers attractive returns

(The Philippine Star) – November 8, 2020 – 12:00am

MANILA, Philippines — As property developers start luring back investors in hopes of a post-pandemic economic recovery, one investment option that stands out is the 168-room Ridgewood Premier Hotel.

Alfonso Keh Jr., treasurer at Novel Residential Concepts Inc., the developer of Ridgewood Premier Hotel, said the prime facility in Fort Bonifacio offers a guaranteed six percent annual return on investment, plus a yearly performance bonus of up to six percent based on hotel occupancy.

Ridgewood Premier Hotel is set to open its doors to local and foreign guests by early 2023, or about the time global economic activity will have picked up immensely.

“We are excited to become a major contributor to the eventual rise of the Philippine tourism industry, which has no way to go but up as the world slowly climbs out of the economic rut caused by the COVID-19 pandemic,”  Keh said.

He emphasized that the best investment strategy to take amid the pandemic is one that utilizes “guarded optimism,” which means a willingness to put in your hard-earned money in a venture that gives a considerable rate of return while providing ample security.

This, he noted, is why the innovative investment package for Ridgewood Premier Hotel remains the most viable option compared to other financial instruments amid the uncertainties caused by COVID-19.

With a guaranteed annual return plus yearly occupancy bonus, buyers of Ridgewood Premier Hotel can look forward to recovering their investment in about eight to 10 years, plus capital appreciation, Keh said.

“Ridgewood Premier Hotel will provide easy access to travelers considering our proximity to the airport, while for business and leisure travelers the allure of Bonifacio Global City (BGC) beckons,” he said.

The hotel is located  on C-5 Road adjacent to BGC. It has units ranging from standard suite (24.8 sqm at P3.54 million), to a two-bedroom suite (55.7 sqm at P6.92 million). Investors can choose between two payment schemes spread over 24 months.

Novel Residential Concepts Inc. is backed by veteran property developers who have a strong track record in building, developing, and running hotels – including the Ramada Manila Central Hotel in Binondo, Manila – as well as concept restaurants. This assures investors that the hotel property will be run and managed by a professional team.

 

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Recreation bowling: Scoreboard

BOWL O DROME



Bowling Scoreboard


© STAN HONDA / AFP/Getty Images
Bowling Scoreboard

Dan Wilkinson Memorial

Fred Leslie 685; Paul Collins 676(299); Tom Brough 675(267); Robert Smith 674

Port Huron Hospital AM

Anita Hubbard 508(180); Delores Masters 494(172); Gordon Harvey 584(252); Steve Wagner 527(186); Matt Tanton 514(190)

COLONY BOWL

Wednesday Night

Nick Medley 743(264); Jeff Meldrum 607; Mike Berube 600(240); Mo Ibrahim 244; Jacob Kapanowski 234; Alyssa Crampton 552(228); Terry Crampton 534(200); Patricia Barker 521(189); Deb Block 203; Jen Doher 200; Rachel Tuttle 199

PORT HURON LANES

3 B4 1

Rosann Brachel 678(275); Cory Smith 707(276); Kevin Renno 696; Jim Creasor 687(261)

Cowboys & Indians

Bob Pihaylic 749(278); Ray LaVere 741(279); Cliff Crawford 738(278); Jesse Hojnacki 735(268); Matt Langolf 730(262); Ryan Kowalski 708(268); Scott Badley 703; Jerry Beery 693; Austin Bedford 692(277); Dom Cocco 263

Don McIvor Memorial

Austin Bedford 715(266); Caremy Snellenberger 698(266); Cheech 682; Dale Camphausen 671(269); Kristie Lashbrook 529(191); Jackie Karl 509(193); Amy Borowski 502(184)

Friday Wanna Bees

Jose Ganhs 646; Terry Thompson 646(239); Steve Beery 642; Tom Bruehan 257; Paul Lewandowski 254; Brenda Bruehan 490(180); Leeann Hill 481(173)

Inter City Ladies

Nikki Hollis 570(215); Dawn Navarro 555(198); Karley Kirkendall 545; Jessica Badley 212; Sharon Sayko 204; Brook Bauman 197

Masters

Paul Schroll 640(228); Brad Brenske 597; Denise Tubbs 443(167); Vicki Streeter 165

PHL Early 4 Man

John Richardson 705(279); Tom Schmitt 692; Bill Dedoe 683(290); Brad Ashton 681(279); Jim Klein 269; Alex Thomes 262; Jeff Dickinson 257

Saturday Nite Bridge

Chuck Ouellette 716(266); Jim Creasor 670(256); Jim Klein 626; Matt Tetreau 227; Jessica Badley 558(203); Jenny Klein 550(201); Heather Bombard 537; Wendy Tetreau 211; Mikayla Dean 209

Sunday Outcast

Matt Pawlak 705(259); Bob Pihaylic 700(258); Scott Badley 696(264); Shelby Doan 494(180); Pam Reid 470(178); Becky Buchheister 465(183)

ST. CLAIR RIVER LANES

Blue Water Mens

Greg Urben 699(246); Henry Sullivan 694(246); Steve McCoy 693(236); Edward Crampton 673(235); Jerry Warner 678(234); Chris Sills 665(247); Tim Wolfe 661(235); Andrew Ekelund 659(268); Dean Zimmerman 657(248); John Galvin 651(245)

River Queens

Anita Hubbard 517(196); Judy Hamilton 491; Jamie Prize-McCoy 473(178); Gabby Ulatowski 191; Luann Kleeves 178

STRIKERS ENTERTAINMENT CENTER

Monday Mixed

Andy Schultz 720(256); Pete Serra 630(226); Ken Swartz 565; Joe Hansen 212; Vicki Vandevelde 534(203); Ruth Bauman 501(196); Kim Ludwig 477(176)

Friday Mixed

Peg Vanantwerp 542(213); Irene Simmons 540(212); Tammy Landrum 536(220); Gary Thurman 624(226); Tom Landrum 613(256); Rich Vandevelde 607; Eric Fader 224; Scott Whiting 300

Sunday Strikers

Jim Gostovich 716(265); Mike Marshall 611; Brandon Varney 599(233); Bubba VanBuren 219; Irene Simmons 542(202); Joan Mozal 531(201); Vicki Vandevelde 498; Gloria Gostovich 204

Tuesday Classic

Ryan Kelly 686; Zach Dudley 684; Shawn Modzelewski 678; Steve Arnold 278; Jon Kovalcik 277; Nick Medley 265

Tuesday Seniors

Candi Emmi 500(180); Peg Vanantwerp 495(192); Karen Harmon 489(209); Dave Emmi 596; Don Bushbaker 591(230); Ken Swartz 550; Gary Vanantwerp 214; Dennis Grobbel 212

Wednesday Women

Kathy Hayward 587(257); Laurynn Ball 542; Jessie Teltow 540(233); Vicki Vandevelde 199

This article originally appeared on Port Huron Times Herald: Recreation bowling: Scoreboard

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Hotel fire in Victoria that injured at least 6 people treated as probable arson

Firefighters in Victoria are treating a hotel fire Thursday night that injured several people as a probable arson.

The fire broke out at the Capital City Centre Hotel, at the corner of Douglas and Discovery streets.

The Victoria Police Department said officers were at the hotel just before 8:30 p.m. PT after a man who they said was armed and in crisis called police.

In a statement, police said they tried to talk to the man from outside his suite. He said he was at risk of harm and had barricaded the door. The smoke detector later went off and smoke was observed but officers could not get inside.

Paramedics were called to the hotel around 9 p.m. The Victoria Fire Department said crews were called in shortly before 10 p.m.

“When we made entry to that suite, there was heavy fire conditions,” Victoria Fire Department Deputy Chief Dan Atkinson said. “We initiated a fire attack at that point in time but the fire was already fairly well established and was able to grow relatively quickly.

“Fortunately, we were on scene quickly and we were able to get water on the fire and prevent further spread from the suite of origin.”

An incident report from the fire department said the fire was mostly confined to the original suite but there was substantial smoke damage to the third and fourth floors.

Flames and smoke erupted from the building as shown by video from the scene and witnessed by fire crews. The building was evacuated.

“We had to perform a rescue of about three different suites [and] perform a rescue off the fourth floor with ground ladders,” Atkinson said.

Atkinson said one person suffered “fairly significant” burns to their arms. Five other people were treated for smoke inhalation. All are now out of hospital.

B.C. Emergency Health Services says it transported seven people to hospital in stable condition.

Police said the man in the suite was apprehended under the Mental Health Act and taken to hospital.

Hotel was providing rooms for homeless people

B.C. Housing told CBC News in an email that it had leased 84 rooms in the hotel to provide supportive housing to 87 people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness. The fire did not originate in one of those rooms.

A spokesperson said in an email that B.C. Housing is now looking for alternative shelter arrangements for the 87 people who are now displaced.

“We are waiting to hear when residents will be able to safely return to their homes at Capital City Centre Hotel,” the spokesperson wrote.

“Meanwhile, we will continue to support and stay connected to residents who have been displaced, ensuring we are doing everything possible to meet their needs during this difficult time.”

Grant McKenzie, communications director with the Our Place Society, which supports homeless people, says the society has managed the B.C. Housing-leased rooms at the hotel since Oct. 15.

He said half the hotel was being used for supportive housing while

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Local sections of Palmetto Trail named as National Recreation Trail (copy) | News

from A1

The Swamp Fox and Awendaw passages of the Palmetto Trail have been recognized as the newest additions to the National Recreation Trail Program. The two passages combined will now be known as The Palmetto National Recreation Trail.

A National Recreation Trail is a designated part of America’s National Trails System. Each NRT must demonstrate that it represents its region, supports a diverse community, and is among Americas best trails. This portion of South Carolina’s state-wide Palmetto Trail spans 58.05 miles and is primarily located within the Francis Marion National Forest.

“We are excited to have received the National Recreation Trail designation for the Swamp Fox and Awendaw Trail passages,” said Mary Roe, Executive Director of the Palmetto Trail. “The 58.05 miles of trail has been used by thousands of hikers and mountain bikers enjoying nature walks, bird watching, cross country runs and camping trips. This is a wonderful example of our successful partnership with the Forest Service.”

The USDA Forest Service – Francis Marion & Sumter National Forests’ Supervisor Rick Lint expressed his appreciation of the Palmetto Conservation Foundations’ work and efforts.

“Our affiliation with the Palmetto Conservation Foundation has been nothing but positive, and we are delighted to hear about this historic national designation of these two popular trails, that will undoubtedly better inform those in nearby communities of unrealized recreational opportunities,” Lint said. “It is our goal to encourage everyone to seek the benefits the outdoors can provide them for better health and well-being, in addition to being good stewards of their public lands.”

American Trails provides a searchable database and map of NRTs and NWTs online. Visitors can access information about a particular NRT, search for different trail activities, or get a list of all the NRTs in any state. Go online to learn more .

About The National Recreation Trails Program

The National Trails System Act of 1968 (Public Law 90-543) authorized creation of a national system of trails comprised of National Recreation Trails, National Scenic Trails, and National Historic Trails.

While National Scenic Trails and National Historic Trails may only be designated by an act of Congress, National Recreation Trails may be designated by the Secretary of Interior or the Secretary of Agriculture to recognize exemplary trails of local and regional significance in response to an application from the trail’s managing agency or organization. Through designation, these trails are recognized as part of America’s national system of trails.

The National Recreation Trails Program supports designated NRT’s with an array of benefits, including promotion, technical assistance, and networking. Its goal is to promote the use and care of existing trails and stimulate the development of new trails to create a national network of trails and realize the vision of “Trails for All Americans.”

About The Palmetto Trail

Our Mission at the Palmetto Trail is to foster an appreciation for South Carolina’s natural and cultural resources, providing opportunities for active recreation on the Palmetto Trail and other trail systems that can be enjoyed by all

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Local sections of Palmetto Trail named as National Recreation Trail | News

from A1

The Swamp Fox and Awendaw passages of the Palmetto Trail have been recognized as the newest additions to the National Recreation Trail Program. The two passages combined will now be known as The Palmetto National Recreation Trail.

A National Recreation Trail is a designated part of America’s National Trails System. Each NRT must demonstrate that it represents its region, supports a diverse community, and is among Americas best trails. This portion of South Carolina’s state-wide Palmetto Trail spans 58.05 miles and is primarily located within the Francis Marion National Forest.

“We are excited to have received the National Recreation Trail designation for the Swamp Fox and Awendaw Trail passages,” said Mary Roe, Executive Director of the Palmetto Trail. “The 58.05 miles of trail has been used by thousands of hikers and mountain bikers enjoying nature walks, bird watching, cross country runs and camping trips. This is a wonderful example of our successful partnership with the Forest Service.”

The USDA Forest Service – Francis Marion & Sumter National Forests’ Supervisor Rick Lint expressed his appreciation of the Palmetto Conservation Foundations’ work and efforts.

“Our affiliation with the Palmetto Conservation Foundation has been nothing but positive, and we are delighted to hear about this historic national designation of these two popular trails, that will undoubtedly better inform those in nearby communities of unrealized recreational opportunities,” Lint said. “It is our goal to encourage everyone to seek the benefits the outdoors can provide them for better health and well-being, in addition to being good stewards of their public lands.”

American Trails provides a searchable database and map of NRTs and NWTs online. Visitors can access information about a particular NRT, search for different trail activities, or get a list of all the NRTs in any state. Go online to learn more.

About The National Recreation Trails Program

The National Trails System Act of 1968 (Public Law 90-543) authorized creation of a national system of trails comprised of National Recreation Trails, National Scenic Trails, and National Historic Trails.

While National Scenic Trails and National Historic Trails may only be designated by an act of Congress, National Recreation Trails may be designated by the Secretary of Interior or the Secretary of Agriculture to recognize exemplary trails of local and regional significance in response to an application from the trail’s managing agency or organization. Through designation, these trails are recognized as part of America’s national system of trails.

The National Recreation Trails Program supports designated NRT’s with an array of benefits, including promotion, technical assistance, and networking. Its goal is to promote the use and care of existing trails and stimulate the development of new trails to create a national network of trails and realize the vision of “Trails for All Americans.”

About The Palmetto Trail

Our Mission at the Palmetto Trail is to foster an appreciation for South Carolina’s natural and cultural resources, providing opportunities for active recreation on the Palmetto Trail and other trail systems that can be enjoyed by all in

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FGCU temporarily closes recreation center after two students test positive for COVID-19

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The surging coronavirus cases and hospitalizations happening around the country reflect the challenge that President Donald Trump or Joe Biden will face in the coming months. (Nov. 6)

AP Domestic

Florida Gulf Coast University closed one of its campus recreation centers Friday after two students tested positive for COVID-19.

Those students recently participated in activities at the University Recreation and Wellness Center and it was likely that other students were in close contact with them, according to an email sent by FGCU Vice President and Chief of Staff Susan Evans.

The entrance to Florida Gulf Coast University. (Photo: Andrea Melendez/The News-Press/USA Today Florida Network)

At 5 p.m. Friday, the center closed temporarily for deep cleaning and to allow case investigators to identify any students who will need to quarantine in addition to the two students who are positive.

The two students with COVID-19 will be isolated and the center will be closed until further notice, Evans stated in the email.

Read: Lee schools: Skyline Elementary classroom closed for 14-day quarantine

Read: FGCU police may have identified person behind anti-Semitic signs

All other campus recreation facilities will remain open.

“If you were in the Center this week and believe you were exposed to COVID-19 – or have concerns you may have been – please call our COVID-19 hotline at 239-590-1206,” Evans said in the email. 

The University Recreation and Wellness Center’s website will have information on reopening.  

Read or Share this story: https://www.news-press.com/story/news/local/2020/11/07/fgcu-temporarily-closes-recreation-center-after-two-students-test-positive-covid-19/6201528002/

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Conditions deteriorating on the Prairies, with dangerous blizzard expected to shut down travel across the region Sunday

CBC

Winter will help COVID-19 spread more easily, experts say — here’s what they suggest you do about it

Canada is heading into its first winter of the COVID-19 pandemic, and some experts say the change in seasons will serve the coronavirus that causes the illness well.Cold weather affects viruses themselves in two major ways: through temperature and humidity, said Dr. Colin Furness, an infection control epidemiologist and assistant professor at the University of Toronto’s faculty of information.When a virus is exhaled, it begins to break down right away, Furness said. But the colder it gets, the slower that process is.”Instead of dying, perhaps, in minutes on a hot summer day, in freezing temperatures, it will last essentially — as far as we know — indefinitely,” Furness said. “It goes from being quick-dying to being immortal, based on temperature.”Winter weather can also help the virus stay aloft longer and travel farther, he said — because of the drier air that typically comes with lower temperatures, and how that affects the respiratory droplets we exhale.”When the droplet you exhale comes out in humid weather … it gets bigger. It attracts water and falls to the ground,” Furness said. “But in really dry, cold air, the opposite happens. The droplet evaporates, it gets lighter, and that happens very fast.”WATCH | Doctors answer questions about what places are higher risk for COVID-19:Then there’s the effect the weather has on people.Cold weather pushes people indoors, Furness said. It also means we don’t have our windows open, meaning our living spaces are won’t be as well ventilated as they other at other times of year.”If you have enough people in a poorly enough ventilated space, [like] holiday time in the winter … that’s sort of the perfect storm for virus transmission,” he said.”It pushes people exactly to where the virus moves very, very well — between people in close quarters.”The dry air also makes our bodies more vulnerable to pathogens, such as the new coronavirus, by drying out the protective mucus membrane that lines our respiratory tracts, said Dr. Dasantila Golemi-Kotra, an expert on microbial infections.”This mucus membrane actually traps these pathogens, and as the air moves out, these pathogens are expelled,” said Golemi-Kotra, who is also an associate professor in York University’s biology department.”At low humidity, this membrane becomes dry … so it’s much easier, now, for the pathogens to get access to the respiratory tract and infect us.”That’s the bad news. Here’s what these experts suggest you can do about it.Mind your mittens”First of all, avoid touching your face with mittens,” Golemi-Kotra said.Your gloves or mittens could come into contact with a lot of high-touch surfaces as you go about your day, so be careful with them. Gauge your daily activities and treat your mitts or gloves accordingly, she advised.If you don’t wear them long or contact many high-touch surfaces, it’s enough to let them sit for several hours in a safe area before re-wearing, she said. Studies show the virus’s stability in

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Vermont advises limiting gatherings, no holiday travel

Lisa Rathke, Associated Press
Published 8:28 a.m. ET Nov. 7, 2020 | Updated 8:29 a.m. ET Nov. 7, 2020

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48. Vermont • Roadway in poor condition: 22.9% (21st highest) • Structurally deficient bridges: 2.4% of bridges (5th lowest) • Locomotive derailments from 2015-2019: 10 (1.7 per 100 miles of track — 5th fewest out of 49 states) • State highway spending per licensed driver: $804 (12th highest) Like most states in the Northeast, Vermont has a higher than average share of roadway in poor condition. States with longer and harsher winters tend to have greater wear and tear on their roads, as water seeps into cracks in the asphalt and expands as it freezes, weakening the integrity of the surface. In Vermont, 22.9% of roadway is in poor condition compared to 21.8% of roadway nationwide. Still, bridges in Vermont are more likely to be structurally sound than in all but four other states. Additionally, railways in the state appear to be in better than average condition as train derailments are far less common than average in Vermont. Broken rails are the leading cause of derailment. ALSO READ: The Plan for Reopening Schools in Vermont This Fall (Photo: Sean Pavone / iStock via Getty Images)

State officials on Friday advised Vermonters not to travel during Thanksgiving and to limit social gatherings in general and to no more than 10 people with a rise in coronavirus outbreaks in Vermont and a surge in cases regionally and nationally.

“The data and the trends of the past few weeks are sending a clear message that we need to up our game in order to protect ourselves and our communities and prevent large-spread infections,” said Health Commissioner Dr. Mark Levine during the governor’s bi-weekly virus briefing.

Even small gatherings can have a big impact, he said. In Vermont, events such as birth parties, dinner parties, sleepovers, baby showers and barbecues have resulted in the spread of COVID-19, the illness caused by the virus, he said.

“I am strongly urging people to lay low this season and forego nonessential travel,” Levine said. He also “strongly” advises that any social gatherings be with 10 or fewer people and with a very limited number of trusted households.

“We cannot know for sure each others infection status. And that’s how the virus spreads,” he said. “Even though we call people trusted households and they mean no ill to us or us to them, it is very challenging in an environment where there is more virus around for people to understand what their potential infection status is at any given point in time even if they’ve had a test recently.”

In Vermont’s largest city, Burlington Mayor Miro Weinberger on Friday urged Chittenden County residents to double down after the county’s seven-day average rose to 12.9 new cases per day.

“We are facing an elevated risk of virus infections in the community right now and this weekend is the time when we can bring it back down, back under control,”

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