Tag: Workers

Laid-off hotel workers rally after health insurance yanked: ‘We’ve been thrown out like yesterday’s garbage’

About 150 hotel workers who’d been laid off — but promised their jobs back when the hotel industry rebounds — gathered in Grant Park Friday to call on their employers to continue providing health insurance.

They are among about 7,000 Chicago hotel workers represented by UNITE HERE Local 1 who are out of work and, since Oct. 1, without health insurance.

“I have really, really bad arthritis and only four pills left, and I have a daughter who needs her braces taken off,” said Shawan Johnson, 41, who worked turning over rooms at the Hilton Chicago for six years until she was laid off in March.

“When you work for a company for many, many years and once a pandemic hits they just say, ‘Well, forget it, no more healthcare, no more anything.’ … It’s like insult to injury,” said Johnson.

Jesus Morales, who’d worked as a banquet server at the Drake Hotel for 33 years until he lost his job in March, said he’s in a tough spot because his wife, who had brain surgery a few years ago, and daughter, who was recently in a car accident, both depend on him for health insurance.

“We have spent years and decades of our lives working for these companies, and now we’ve been thrown out like yesterday’s garbage,” he said. “They should be ashamed of how they’re treating us.”

Jesus Morales, a banquet server at The Drake, took part in a rally with other hotel workers who are demanding health insurance in the Loop, Friday afternoon, Oct. 23, 2020. | Pat Nabong/Sun-Times
Pat Nabong/Sun-Times

The crowd chanted, “We deserve better!” before marching under a light drizzle several blocks around the Hilton Chicago, 720 S. Michigan Ave.

The majority of workers represented by the union are women of color, according to Unite Here spokeswoman Sarah Lyons. The workers are, in part, room attendants, bartenders, cooks, servers, bellmen and doormen.

Hotel workers and their supporters march to demand health insurance in the Loop, Friday afternoon, Oct. 23, 2020. | Pat Nabong/Sun-Times
Pat Nabong/Sun-Times

Their jobs are spread among dozens of hotels, but the largest chunk of them work for the Hilton, Marriott and Hyatt hotel chains, Lyons said.

Representatives of the three hotel groups did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

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It’s getting bleak for out-of-work hotel workers: ‘My biggest worry is securing shelter’

Payne, along with her 27-year-old daughter Kipati and 28-year-old son Atrayu, gather in their North Philadelphia living room, with the household bills in hand. She reviews the mortgage payments and her retirement and savings accounts with her children.

“We’re going into our fourth month of not paying our mortgage,” Payne tells them. “I was hoping to pass on my retirement savings to you, but it looks like we’re not going to have that. That’s gone — because we’re using it to get by.”

Payne, 51, a single parent, recently received a letter from Marriott, which she reads out loud to her children: “We’re extending your layoff until December 31, 2020.”

The US leisure and hospitality industry lost 7.5 million jobs in April, accounting for half of all jobs in that sector, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Recovery has been slow, with only about half of those jobs lost early on in the pandemic added back.

In a new survey by the American Hotel Lodging Association, 74% of US hotels say more layoffs are coming if the industry doesn’t get additional federal assistance.

For months, Congress has been negotiating a new stimulus bill, but Democrats and Republicans have yet to reach a deal. House Democrats could potentially vote on a pared down version of their coronavirus stimulus legislation this week, hoping to break the stalemate that has kept relief from reaching many out-of-work Americans and struggling businesses. The hotel industry is looking for assistance through a new version of the Paycheck Protection Program, which would likely be included in the relief bill and would aim to help businesses to pay staff.

“It’s scary because I’m waiting, but there’s no guarantee I’m going to come back,” said Payne.

Payne has lost not one, but two jobs. Her part-time job as a bartender is also on hold, she says. Before the pandemic, she was working seven days a week to pay for her new home and feed her children. Her son Atrayu is autistic and her daughter is his home health aide.

Payne, who has arthritis and a heart condition, is also nervous about getting sick from Covid-19 and fears the worst.

“I’m trying to prepare my daughter — how to pay the mortgage, how we pay the bills — so that she can be the head of the household because my son cannot. I’m preparing for a death sentence financially, as well as physically,” she said.

‘We live and die’ by conventions

Hotel occupancy is at 50% nationwide, but just 27% in Philadelphia, according to STR, a global analytics firm that tracks the hospitality industry.

And that could get worse. Every winter hotels in Philadelphia expect occupancy to dip, but their saving grace has been conventions. Several hotels, including the Marriott, are attached to the Philadelphia Convention Center, which is often booked a decade in advance, according to the Greater Philadelphia Hotel Association. But with gatherings of more than 25 people prohibited in the city, the conventions have come to

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Should laid-off Tacoma hotel workers automatically get their jobs back when COVID ends?

Tacoma City Council is exploring an ordinance that would require hotels in Tacoma with 60 rooms or more to provide recall rights to workers laid off during the pandemic.

The proposed ordinance, brought to City Council for discussion at a meeting on Tuesday, would sunset in March 2021 unless extended by Council. It would require hotels to:

? Provide written notice to laid-off employees of job positions that become available for which those employees are qualified, and

? Offer available positions to the laid-off employees with the greatest length of service for the hotel.

City Council decided Tuesday to first run the idea through the Economic Development Committee to determine how the ordinance would impact workers and the hotel industry.

“It was sent to EDC because it wasn’t simple and begged for greater vetting and understanding,” said Council member Robert Thoms, who also chairs the EDC. “As we work to schedule discussions on this issue, I truly hope our hotels can effectively and safely reopen and our workers can get back to work.”

The proposal was brought forward by Council member Lillian Hunter after former workers at Hotel Murano, operated by Provenance Hotels, spoke at a City Council meeting on Sept. 22.

The workers sought the Council’s help to implement recall rights, which allow laid-off workers to be recalled to their former jobs when they become available. The workers, represented by Unite Here Local 8, had recall rights in their contracts, but they expired mid-September, they said.

“My family and I have counted on this Hotel Murano for my family’s second income,” Stephen Reeves, a 17-year banquet bartender at Hotel Murano, told City Council in September. “It’s just heartbreaking to hear what we are hearing about Hotel Murano’s desire to rid itself of all the experience that has made this hotel what it is.”

Unite Here Local 8 represents more than 100 workers at the Hotel Murano and is in support of the ordinance, and not just for its own unionized workers.

“We think a hotel recall ordinance is a fair proposition for workers and the industry to make sure workers get back to work as business starts to return,” Maris Zivarts, research director for Unite Here Local 8, told The News Tribune by phone Oct. 13. He added that workers will gather for a vigil at 7 p.m. Monday outside of Tacoma City Hall in support of laid off hotel workers.

Mark Filipini, outside counsel for Hotel Murano, told The News Tribune in a phone interview Oct. 15 that formal negotiations with the union representing the workers could take place in the next few weeks.

“When I talk to the HR director, and others, the employees are really well liked, they’re long-term staff,” Filipini said. “Yes it’s true the recall rights have expired, but I haven’t heard any plan to replace the employees wholesale or anything like that. I think they are an important part of the business.”

The state’s Employment Security Department in June first made public the

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Tacoma explores required recall rights for hotel workers

Tacoma City Council is exploring an ordinance that would require hotels in Tacoma with 60 rooms or more to provide recall rights to workers laid off during the pandemic.

The proposed ordinance, brought to City Council for discussion at a meeting on Tuesday, would sunset in March 2021 unless extended by Council. It would require hotels to:

Provide written notice to laid-off employees of job positions that become available for which those employees are qualified, and

Offer available positions to the laid-off employees with the greatest length of service for the hotel.

City Council decided Tuesday to first run the idea through the Economic Development Committee to determine how the ordinance would impact workers and the hotel industry.

“It was sent to EDC because it wasn’t simple and begged for greater vetting and understanding,” said Council member Robert Thoms, who also chairs the EDC. “As we work to schedule discussions on this issue, I truly hope our hotels can effectively and safely reopen and our workers can get back to work.”

The proposal was brought forward by Council member Lillian Hunter after former workers at Hotel Murano, operated by Provenance Hotels, spoke at a City Council meeting on Sept. 22.

The workers sought the Council’s help to implement recall rights, which allow laid-off workers to be recalled to their former jobs when they become available. The workers, represented by Unite Here Local 8, had recall rights in their contracts, but they expired mid-September, they said.

“My family and I have counted on this Hotel Murano for my family’s second income,” Stephen Reeves, a 17-year banquet bartender at Hotel Murano, told City Council in September. “It’s just heartbreaking to hear what we are hearing about Hotel Murano’s desire to rid itself of all the experience that has made this hotel what it is.”

Unite Here Local 8 represents more than 100 workers at the Hotel Murano and is in support of the ordinance, and not just for its own unionized workers.

“We think a hotel recall ordinance is a fair proposition for workers and the industry to make sure workers get back to work as business starts to return,” Maris Zivarts, research director for Unite Here Local 8, told The News Tribune by phone Oct. 13. He added that workers will gather for a vigil at 7 p.m. Monday outside of Tacoma City Hall in support of laid off hotel workers.

Mark Filipini, outside counsel for Hotel Murano, told The News Tribune in a phone interview Oct. 15 that formal negotiations with the union representing the workers could take place in the next few weeks.

“When I talk to the HR director, and others, the employees are really well liked, they’re long-term staff,” Filipini said. “Yes it’s true the recall rights have expired, but I haven’t heard any plan to replace the employees wholesale or anything like that. I think they are an important part of the business.”

The state’s Employment Security Department in June first made public the

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Top NYC hospital execs are in Florida as workers fight virus

Two of the Mount Sinai Health System’s top executives are riding out the coronavirus pandemic down in Florida, as their hospitals up north weather medical supply shortages and rising death tolls, report Melissa Klein and Beth Landman of the New York Post.

Dr. Kenneth Davis, 72, the CEO of the Mount Sinai Health System, and Dr. Arthur Klein, 72, president of the Mount Sinai Health Network, are both sheltering near Palm Beach, Florida, according to the Post. Dr. Davis is thought to have been in his waterfront $2.6 million, six-bedroom, eight-bathroom mansion since at least early March. It is not known how long Dr. Klein has been in Florida, but the Post reports that he is staying at his oceanfront condo down in Palm Beach.

Their absence from New York City comes as the city’s health system overflows with victims and patients while the coronavirus pandemic wreaks havoc on the state. New York City is now the epicenter of the virus in the United States, with over 45,000 cases and at least 1,500 reported deaths.

Amid a medical supply shortage, hospital workers have resorted to reusing face masks and wearing trash bags as hospital gowns to treat patients. Makeshift morgues are now situated outside of hospitals, and a field hospital has been set up at Central Park. 

Dr. Davis has been CEO of the Mount Sinai Medical Center since 2003. He was previously the chair of Mount Sinai’s Department of Psychiatry, a position he held for 15 years. He is also a noted Alzheimer’s researcher. Dr. Klein has been president of the Mount Sinai Health Network since February 2013. Trained as a pediatric cardiologist, he previously worked as the Regional Executive Director, Western Region of the North Shore-LIJ Health System.

Two hospital leaders take to Palm Beach as workers in New York City succumb to the coronavirus

In his daily briefing on April 2, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said New York City has only a 6-day supply of ventilators. Meanwhile, NYC Mayor Bill de Blasio expects the number of cases to rise substantially, with an urgent need for increased help and more medical professionals in the city.

Dr. Davis, when reached by the Post, said that he had been in Florida before the pandemic reached the point it’s at now. He also told the Post’s reporters that he was advised by his doctor to stay in Florida because of his age. He then suggested that Dr. Klein was told the same thing and that they don’t have to physically be in the city to “get the job done.”

Meanwhile, hospital workers in the city, including those who work for Mount Sinai, are being infected with the virus as they treat patients. On April 2, it was reported that Priscilla Carrow, a coordinating manager at Elmhurst Hospital in Queens, had died from COVID-19, just days after Kious Kelly, an assistant nurse manager at Mount Sinai West in Manhattan, died. Kelly was just 48.

“Do you know that from the time

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Recreation Workers


39-9032 Recreation Workers

Conduct recreation activities with groups in public, private, or volunteer agencies or recreation facilities. Organize and promote activities, such as arts and crafts, sports, games, music, dramatics, social recreation, camping, and hobbies, taking into account the needs and interests of individual members.


National estimates for this occupation
Industry profile for this occupation
Geographic profile for this occupation

National estimates for this occupation: Top

Employment estimate and mean wage estimates for this occupation:



Employment (1) Employment
RSE (3)
Mean hourly
wage
Mean annual
wage (2)
Wage RSE (3)
358,750 1.1 % $14.10 $29,330 0.4 %

Percentile wage estimates for this occupation:




Percentile 10% 25% 50%
(Median)
75% 90%
Hourly Wage $9.07 $10.66 $12.67 $16.17 $21.15
Annual Wage (2) $18,860 $22,170 $26,350 $33,630 $44,000


Industry profile for this occupation: Top

Industries with the highest published employment and wages for this occupation are provided.
For a list of all industries with employment in this occupation, see the Create Customized Tables function.

Industries with the highest levels of employment in this occupation:







Industry Employment (1) Percent of industry employment Hourly mean wage Annual mean wage (2)
Local Government, excluding schools and hospitals (OES Designation) 114,640 2.07 $14.17 $29,460
Nursing Care Facilities (Skilled Nursing Facilities) 37,970 2.37 $14.28 $29,690
Other Amusement and Recreation Industries 37,240 2.76 $13.37 $27,810
Civic and Social Organizations 36,690 9.49 $13.13 $27,310
Individual and Family Services 24,960 0.98 $14.19 $29,520

Industries with the highest concentration of employment in this occupation:







Industry Employment (1) Percent of industry employment Hourly mean wage Annual mean wage (2)
RV (Recreational Vehicle) Parks and Recreational Camps 6,780 11.47 $13.36 $27,790
Civic and Social Organizations 36,690 9.49 $13.13 $27,310
Other Amusement and Recreation Industries 37,240 2.76 $13.37 $27,810
Continuing Care Retirement Communities and Assisted Living Facilities for the Elderly 22,740 2.40 $14.70 $30,570
Nursing Care Facilities (Skilled Nursing Facilities) 37,970 2.37 $14.28 $29,690

Top paying industries for this occupation:






Industry Employment (1) Percent of industry employment Hourly mean wage Annual mean wage (2)
Federal Executive Branch (OES Designation) 1,620 0.08 $28.40 $59,080
State Government, excluding schools and hospitals (OES Designation) 2,360 0.11 $19.52 $40,600
Independent Artists, Writers, and Performers 60 0.12 $18.86 $39,240
Specialty (except Psychiatric and Substance Abuse) Hospitals 300 0.11 $16.75 $34,840
Community Food and Housing, and Emergency and
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