Wyndham Vacation Resorts / Timeshares – Scam promise! Review 59202

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I am completely appalled by what I am about to tell you. Purchased a timeshare from fairfield fairshare plus resorts currently doing business as wyndham vacation resorts, rci, cendant inc (parent company). Being skeptical about the ease and worry free vacation promise, they promised big vacation savings, convenience, flexibility, and great customer service. All false. My main contention for buying this timeshare was my inability to use it yearly and lengthy advance reservations. “no problem, you can bank up to 4 years of unused timeshare, ” they preached. I have called several times and have not had any unused timeshare banked because I called to early, too late, on time and they still miss handled it. They told me if I ever need to stay in a hotel call one off the list and use my vacation points to get a room. That sounded good, so I tried that by calling their hotel number for a reservation 16 days in advance. They mail a certificate to use in about 14 days. I left and the certificate never arrived, how convenient is that, shouldn’t it be click, click and in the mail? I asked to have it emailed and I will print it out, or let me right down the numbers needed to check in. What a hassle. I had to pay for hotel, and never got reimbursed by fairfield. As it turns out, they embellished, lied about the ease of getting a hotel if I am traveling by car and need to stop and get a room.

As a bonus for being a new wonderfully appreciated customer (sucker) I received a free vacation week. I found out 2 years later by a fairfield sales person, that fairfield was charging me maintenance assessment fees for the free vacation time. According to a fairfield sales person, and a fairfield customer service representative, that should not happen. Not resolved.
Fairfield’s timeshare costs about $600 per year in maintenance fees for a week vacation. And in addition, a $5 monthly service fee for mailing a monthly bill. Fairfield’s scam begins by calling me to give them a credit card number for an automatic maintenance fee withdrawal to eliminate the $5 per month service fee for mailing the monthly maintenance assessment fee. I refused twice, and gave them my credit card number for the automatic withdrawal the third time they called.

The scam continues with a letter saying my maintenance fee is two months over due. I called customer service several times over several months. Their responses were first, you’re all set up and we have been making withdrawals, we’ll research this and get back to you. Second, they said we’ll remove this, it may take a month. Two months later I call customer service after receiving another late payment letter, and explain my previous calls, to resolve this mistake. Now customer service tells me to disregard future letters, we have your information, we will take care of this. Now a collection letter arrives.

Timeshares and Vacation Plans | FTC Consumer Information

The thought of owning a vacation home may sound appealing, but the year-round responsibility — and expense — that come with it may not. Buying a timeshare or vacation plan may be an alternative. If you’re thinking about opting for a timeshare or vacation plan, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the nation’s consumer protection agency, says it’s a good idea to do some homework. If you’re not careful, you could end up having a hard time selling your timeshare.

The Basics of Buying a Timeshare

Two basic vacation ownership options are available: timeshares and vacation interval plans. The value of these options is in their use as vacation destinations, not as investments. Because so many timeshares and vacation interval plans are available, the resale value of yours is likely to be a good deal lower than what you paid. Both a timeshare and a vacation interval plan require you to pay an initial purchase price and periodic maintenance fees. The initial purchase price may be paid all at once or over time; periodic maintenance fees are likely to increase every year.

Deeded Timeshare Ownership. In a timeshare, you either own your vacation unit for the rest of your life, for the number of years spelled out in your purchase contract, or until you sell it. Your interest is legally considered real property. You buy the right to use a specific unit at a specific time every year, and you may rent, sell, exchange, or bequeath your specific timeshare unit. You and the other timeshare owners collectively own the resort property.

Unless you’ve bought the timeshare outright for cash, you are responsible for paying the monthly mortgage. Regardless of how you bought the timeshare, you also are responsible for paying an annual maintenance fee; property taxes may be extra. Owners share in the use and upkeep of the units and of the common grounds of the resort property. A homeowners’ association usually handles management of the resort. Timeshare owners elect officers and control the expenses, the upkeep of the resort property, and the selection of the resort management company.

“Right to Use” Vacation Interval Option. In this option, a developer owns the resort, which is made up of condominiums or units. Each condo or unit is divided into “intervals” — either by weeks or the equivalent in points. You purchase the right to use an interval at the resort for a specific number of years — typically between 10 and 50 years. The interest you own is legally considered personal property. The specific unit you use at the resort may not be the same each year. In addition to the price for the right to use an interval, you pay an annual maintenance fee that is likely to increase each year.

Within the “right to use” option, several plans can affect your ability to use a unit:

  • Fixed or Floating Time. In a fixed time option, you buy the unit for use during a specific week of the year. In a