Tag: stayathome

Minister Tito encourages stay-at-home recreation during holidays amid virus fears – National

Home Minister Tito Karnavian has encouraged the public to spend the next long weekend at home amid concerns over a potential spike in COVID-19 cases during the holidays.

He advised against traveling to other regions and visiting popular tourist destinations to prevent further transmission of the deadly coronavirus throughout the long weekend, which includes the collective leave days from Oct. 28 to 30 and the birthday of the Prophet Muhammad on Oct. 29.

“Based on our previous experience, long weekends usually entail high mobility […] potentially triggering [COVID-19] transmission,” Tito said following a meeting with President Joko “Jokowi” Widodo at the Presidential Palace in Jakarta on Monday.

He called on the public to spend the holiday period with family members at home to help curb the spread of COVID-19.

Read also: Jokowi calls for caution amid concerns over COVID-19 case spike during long weekend

Furthermore, Tito said the central government had scheduled a meeting with several regional heads later this week to minimize mobility among the public amid health concerns.

He suggested that regional administrations re-apply similar protocols that were in effect during the Idul Fitri holidays earlier this year, such as mandatory quarantine for domestic tourists.

“Tourist destinations may become [virus hotspots], which is why they need to be seriously discussed among regional heads,” Tito said, while also calling for the postponement of social and cultural events for the sake of public health and safety.

Jokowi previously urged all related stakeholders to take anticipatory measures amid concerns over a possible spike in COVID-19 cases across the country throughout the long stretch of national holidays later this month.

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Michiganders can’t go back and forth to vacation homes under Gov. Whitmer’s latest stay-at-home order

LANSING, MI — Those who have multiple homes in Michigan will no longer be allowed to travel freely between those properties as part of the latest stay-at-home order.

Gov. Gretchen Whitmer Thursday extended the “Stay Home, Stay Safe” order through April 30, which in part restricts travel for non-essential reasons throughout the state.

That extension now includes more language about traveling between multiple homes in Michigan. According to the order, which goes into effect at 11:59 p.m. tonight, travel is permitted:

“Between two residences in this state, through April 10, 2020. After that date, travel between two residences is not permitted.”

That means Michiganders have until the end of the day Friday to choose which homes they will live in. After that, they will be subject to fines and penalties if they are violating the order by traveling between the two homes. However, if you are returning from out of state or traveling to a residence out of Michigan, that is allowed. That includes ‘snowbirds’ who are currently living out of state and who are weighing their options for when to return to Michigan.

“Data shows that most Michiganders are doing their part by staying home and staying safe. That’s good, but we must keep it up,” Whitmer said in a press release announcing the extension.

The order comes three days after James Janisse, the village president of Elk Rapids, Michigan reached out to the governor, urging her to force Michiganders to make a one-time choice on which home they want to live in during the stay-at-home order. Janisse and other officials in smaller northern Michigan towns have expressed concern regarding downstate residents traveling north to their vacation or second homes.

While those cities and towns typically enjoy having more people around, right now, they’re concerned about the ability to fight the COVID-19 virus in small towns. Janisse says people arriving in the small towns are not self-quarantining and going out to grocery stores, gas stations and other businesses deemed essential and that remain open.

“House activity rivals that of Independence Day and Harbor Days,” Janisse said in a letter to Whitmer. “At any other time, this would be cause for celebration, but right now it is not.”

He’s concerned those traveling may unknowingly spread the virus in communities where health facilities are not equipped to handle a significant outbreak.

In some areas, those who decide to move to vacation homes are encouraged to self-isolate for 14 days once they have arrived home. Earlier this week, Dr. Michael Collins, medical director of the Grand Traverse County Health Department urged travelers to self-isolate and avoid trips to the grocery store or anything that would put them in contact with others.

“It doesn’t take many who don’t follow that kind of instruction to really make a big difference in the ultimate success or failure, in terms of how many cases we get and how quickly,” Collins said.

PREVENTION TIPS

In addition to washing hands regularly and not touching your face, officials recommend

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Outdoor recreation activities limited, not banned by Governor Polis’ stay-at-home order

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We’ve got answers to frequently asked questions about the coronavirus stay-at-home orders.

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Colorado residents can still go outside for exercise under the statewide stay-at-home order, Gov. Jared Polis said Friday, but they are urged to stay close to home and keep a safe distance from others to help slow the spread of the new coronavirus.

The stay-at-home order issued Thursday doesn’t mean you have to stay inside.

You can go for a walk in the park, a jog around the neighborhood, a bicycle ride or to your favorite local fishing spot, the governor said. It’s even OK to get in your car and drive to locations near your home to participate in those activities.

The city of Fort Collins and the Larimer County Department of Health and Environment, following the lead of the World Health Organization, continue to stress the importance of outdoor exercise for personal health. The governor also emphasized it but suggests outdoor recreation be limited to what is “absolutely necessary” for the duration of the stay-at-home order, which runs through April 11.

Larimer County’s order lasts through April 17.

“If you need to recreate, and we love our outdoors, do it in communities close to your home,” Polis said at a news conference a day after issuing the stay-at-home order to combat the spread of the coronavirus. “… This pandemic is not a vacation. It’s not the time to drive 2 or 3 hours from Denver to mountain communities, many of which are reeling from the crisis. Let me add that that is really dumb, because those communities have a higher rate of infection than where you live.”

FAQs: Larimer County and Colorado stay-at-home orders to prevent coronavirus

Polis is asking residents to avoid parking areas and trails that don’t have enough space for people from different households to remain at least 6 feet apart from one another. That might also mean finding a less-used trail or recreating at off-peak times, he said.

Horsetooth Reservoir and the trails surrounding it are a great option for Fort Collins residents, Larimer County Department of Health and Environment spokeswoman Katie O’Donnell said, provided they don’t all go to the same trails at the same time.

There are numerous city, county and state parks and open spaces in and around Fort Collins for people to get outside and enjoy.

Even the three city-run golf courses that have been closed for play — City Park Nine, Collindale and SouthRidge —are open for walking, running and similar activities “for the mental and physical well-being of our community,” city spokeswoman Valerie Van Ry wrote in an email Friday night.

“Visitors to the course(s) are asked to recreate responsibly and observe the minimum physical distancing of 6 feet from other individuals,” she wrote.

Police: We won’t pull you over just to enforce Larimer County’s stay-at-home order

Some outdoor recreation areas where people were found to be consistently violating social-distancing guidelines have already been closed and others will be, she said, if the guidelines

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How the governor’s stay-at-home order applies to outdoor recreation

A cyclist make her way up Lookout Mountain on March 25. (Andy Cross, The Denver Post)

Gov. Jared Polis last week imposed a stay-at-home order for Coloradans due to the coronavirus, but added that outdoor exercise is still allowed as an “essential” activity. He also urged Coloradans to recreate in communities close to where they live.

“Our mountains and our canyons have been here for hundreds of thousands of years, and they’re going to be here for hundreds of thousands of years,” Polis said. “So wait until this blows over to enjoy them.”

Here are answers to some of the questions that have arisen since the order was issued:

Is outdoor exercise allowed under the stay-at-home order?

Not only is it allowed, it is encouraged. The governor has been consistent about that since the beginning of the crisis because of the physical and mental health benefits associated with exercise. He has, however, suggested people cut back on their outdoor exercise and mix in indoor exercise alternatives on occasion. “Stop putting yourself and others at risk,” Polis said. “Of course, maintain your physical fitness, and engage as you need in physical activity. But please, be careful and judicious.”

RELATED: Where to go online for free home workouts, from cardio to yoga

If I live in Denver, may I go to the mountains to recreate?

“If you live in a city, you certainly shouldn’t be leaving your city to recreate,” Polis said. “You should use your municipal parks at off-hours. I’ve encouraged municipalities to expand the hours of operation of those parks to further spread it out. It also generally will mean recreating less during this crisis.”

If I live outside of Denver, may I leave my town or county to recreate?

People should recreate near where they live, Polis insisted. While acknowledging that means different things to different people depending on where they live, he strongly discouraged people living in the Front Range from visiting the mountains. “Just because you’re not working, this doesn’t mean it’s vacation,” Polis said. “It’s not the time to drive two or three hours from Denver to mountain communities, many of which are reeling from the crisis. Let me add, that is really dumb, because those communities have a higher rate of infection than where you live. So the last thing you should want to do is drive to your second residence, or a hotel, or a cabin in the mountains.”

Which types of outdoor recreation are allowed?

Individual exercise is OK but participating in group activities is not. Denver Parks have closed basketball and tennis courts. Playgrounds are closed.

Maintaining social distancing and avoiding groups is mandatory. “People shouldn’t be playing in groups,” Polis said. “Basketball, as an example. You can play one on one with a housemate, but not full-team basketball. Frisbee, again, with a housemate, but not Frisbee tag or ultimate (Frisbee). It’s about using common sense to try to engage in the necessary recreation you need, as close to home as possible.”

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