Tag: Historic

Paranormal activity at historic Hotel Apache

LAS VEGAS (KTNV) — Down the long and narrow hallways of the Hotel Apache and up four flights you’ll land at room 400, once known as the penthouse of the historic downtown hotel.

Tony Cornero, one of the original owners, was a bootlegger and gambling entrepreneur and as Elizabeth Bristow explained, he wasn’t known for being a very up and up businessman.

“Sometimes with that type of business can come some interesting activity that happens around those people and it’s likely some of that activity found its way near this property, if not potentially on it,” said Bristow, who’s the social media manager for TLC Casinos.

And ever since, the property with its quirky rolling hallways and dusty secret rooms, has been known for paranormal activity. Employees and guests report hearing voices, seeing shadows and noticing objects have moved. Even Bristow herself has been caught dumbfounded.

RELATED: 13 Most Haunted Places in Las Vegas

“Right before we reopened the hotel after remodeling it, the employees got to stay to do a test run, make sure everything was working the way it was supposed to work,” she said.

Bristow arrived early in the afternoon before her friend was to join her. She began to hear noise in the next room, like someone was moving furniture and even trying to open the windows…which had just been sealed.

“My concern was someone in the room not knowing that things had been sealed would accidentally break it not knowing so I called down to our front desk.” she recounted. “She goes, ‘hold on for a second. There’s no one in that room and there’s no one staying in that room and there’s no one going to be in that room.’ Like, oh okay everything’s fine,” Bristow said with a laugh.

Bristow said that experience made all the other reports feel very real.

RELATED: Halloween events in Las Vegas | 2020

And for someone who believes in that kind of thing, she said it was not only interesting but great!

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Historic hotel gets new life as Columns, starting with modern flavor from Coquette | Where NOLA Eats

It’s something in the appealing mystery rising with each turn of the ornate staircase, the perpetual twilight of the cloistered bar, the tropical languor of the deep porch, framed by those majestic white columns.

All this goes into the feel of the historic mansion long known as the Columns Hotel.



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A coffered ceiling rises over the bar at Columns on St. Charles Avenue in New Orleans, Oct. 26, 2020. (Photo by Chris Granger | The Times-Picayune | The New Orleans Advocate)




It’s a classic setting that’s still as accessible as an afternoon cocktail. Perhaps for that reason, countless New Orleans people have built their own affinity to it through the years.

Now it’s beginning a new chapter with new owners, a new chef and a revamp meant not to transform the old place but rather to revitalize the role it has long held.

It also has a new name, now simply Columns, though whether people really drop “the Columns” remains to be seen, and perhaps heard.



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A view from the hallway into the lounge at Columns on St. Charles Avenue in New Orleans, Oct. 26, 2020. (Photo by Chris Granger | The Times-Picayune | The New Orleans Advocate)




Columns is opening in phases, with the public areas open for food and drinks now and room bookings to come later in the year.

The renovations are significant but rarely feel sweeping, with more layers peeled back than added on. Mostly, it’s about familiar spaces reframed and freshened up, though not too much.

“We don’t want to scare away the ghosts,” said Jayson Seidman, who bought the hotel last year.



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Jayson Seidman at Columns, the hotel in a historic mansion he reopened on St. Charles Avenue in New Orleans, photographed Oct. 26, 2020. (Photo by Chris Granger | The Times-Picayune | The New Orleans Advocate)




The biggest change thus far comes from the kitchen and bar, run now by chef Michael Stoltzfus and his team from Coquette.

Their menu is built around casual food with a modern lens, and a bent toward lighter, fresher flavors.



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Green cabbage with smoked trout roe, fennel aioli and dill at Columns, where chef Mike Stoltzfus and his team from Coquette leads the kitchen and bar, Oct. 26, 2020. (Photo by Chris Granger | The Times-Picayune | The New Orleans Advocate)




Smoked trout roe is dappled between curls of cabbage transformed by char and fennel aioli. There’s a chili-flecked cashew hummus with a rainbow of crunchy vegetables to dip, and broad slices of country ham share a platter with pickles, pimento cheese and puffy shrimp crackers.

The roasted oysters are dabbed with swiss chard, butter and a Tabasco mash; the burger is made with a dash of smoky andouille.



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Making a Sazerac at Columns on St. Charles Avenue in New Orleans, Oct. 26, 2020. (Photo by Chris Granger | The Times-Picayune | The New Orleans Advocate)




The

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Historic Downtown Beaumont building could become hotel, apartments


A long-time property owner of historic buildings in Downtown Beaumont is asking the city for approval to transform his property into a new hotel and apartment complex.

Richard Gilbert, principal of GP Realty and owner of the antique mall building on the corner of Orleans and Forsyth streets, will present a request Tuesday at the Beaumont City Council meeting for a specific use permit to zone the buildings for multi-family dwellings and hotel lodging.


Gilbert, a real estate developer in Houston, said he decided to make the move because he has long felt Beaumont’s downtown has missed out from a lack of housing opportunities.

“The demand is there, just no one has developed it for whatever reason,” he said. “I’ve been having this idea to redevelop this property to a residential facility, but kept them commercial because there was still demand for the space.”



The pandemic’s impact on brick-and-mortar businesses combined with low interest rates and widely available capital created the perfect environment to start the transformation to a residential property, Gilbert said.

The former antique mall on Orleans Street currently is zoned commercial — which allows for use as a storefront, office or hotel — but will have to be zoned multi-family in order to house apartments.


The building itself was built in 1938 and is about 12,800 square feet. The entire property, which includes about a quarter-acre of land, was last appraised by the Jefferson County Appraisal District at around $216,000.


If approved by the council, the project would join a smattering of existing condos spread through the city’s central business district.

Chris Boone, director of planning and development for the City of Beaumont, said there currently were just 60 units downtown, mostly concentrated in two developments completed about a decade ago.

“The majority of those (units) were brought on the market about 10 years ago when Landmark Realty out of North Carolina developed the old Antioch Church and the old Neches Electric into apartments, and the Cathedral Square development came online about the same time,” Boone said in an email to the Enterprise.

A cursory

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Conversion of historic downtown Milwaukee Masonic Center to hotel is on hold, and the building is for sale.

Plans to convert a historic downtown Milwaukee building into a luxury hotel have been indefinitely delayed, with the property listed for sale.



a view of a city at night: Construction of a luxury hotel is to begin by June at downtown Milwaukee's former Humphrey Scottish Rite Masonic Center.


© Kraig Kalashian Architecture & Design, Metro Studio
Construction of a luxury hotel is to begin by June at downtown Milwaukee’s former Humphrey Scottish Rite Masonic Center.

An affiliate of Madison-based Ascendant Holdings Real Estate bought the former Humphrey Scottish Rite Masonic Center,  790 N. Van Buren St., in 2017 for $3.5 million.

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Ascendant planned to convert the three-story Masonic Center into the hotel’s lobby, restaurant and meeting rooms, with a 14-story addition atop the building’s southern end, stepped back from the street.

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That tower was designed for 215 to 220 guest rooms, with five to 10 guest rooms on the Masonic Center’s third floor. 

Those plans were approved by the city Historic Preservation Commission, with Portland, Oregon-based Provenance Hotels agreeing to manage the hotel.

But, a planned 2019 construction start didn’t happen. And this year’s COVID-19 pandemic has devastated the hotel industry.

Ascendant now has the building listed for sale with Colliers International, a commercial real estate brokerage.

“In light of the current market conditions in the hospitality sector, our proposed hotel plan is on hold,” said Eric Nordeen, Ascendant co-owner.

Prospective buyers include hotel developers, Nordeen said, “so the possibility for a similar project still exists, and we may or may not have a role in the project going forward.”

“It’s a great site for a variety of uses, and should be worthy of development when market conditions stabilize, he said.

Scottish Rite sold the building because the fraternal organization’s dwindling membership could no longer afford to maintain it.

The building was constructed as a church in 1889 and became a Masonic facility in 1912. It was extensively remodeled in 1936.

Tom Daykin can be emailed at tdaykin@jrn.com and followed on Instagram, Twitter and Facebook. 

Our subscribers make this reporting possible. Please consider supporting local journalism by subscribing to the Journal Sentinel at jsonline.com/deal.

This article originally appeared on Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: Conversion of historic downtown Milwaukee Masonic Center to hotel is on hold, and the building is for sale.

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Voting in Person in Los Angeles? Do It at the Historic Hotel Figueroa

The Hotel Figueroa in downtown Los Angeles is doing its part to help Californians do their civic duty.



a statue in front of a building: Hotel Figueroa


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Hotel Figueroa

From Oct. 30 through Nov. 3, the historic hotel — a Travel + Leisure 2020 World’s Best Award winner — is transforming its premier ballroom into 2,100 square feet of socially-distanced voting space.

Californians will be able to cast their votes in-person at the hotel from 10:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. Oct. 30 through Nov. 2. Socially-distanced voting booths will open at 7 a.m. on Nov. 3 (Election Day) and close at 8:00 p.m.

The hotel is requiring face masks indoors and has built 10-feet of social distance into its coronavirus prevention protocols. “We are humbled to be able to offer a safe space to help facilitate socially-distanced voter turnout and engagement during this historic election,” Hotel Figueroa’s Managing Director, Connie Wang, said in a statement.

Hotel Figueroa is among several hotels across the U.S. that are hosting in-person voting this year as an increasing number of properties look to repurpose spaces emptied by the pandemic.

The Hotel Figueroa opened as a YWCA hostel in 1926 and has served as a meeting spot for several local women’s groups over the years. Nowadays, it’s a Moroccan-inspired downtown oasis that conjures up images of Casablanca just a few blocks from the Staples Center. The hotel has 285 rooms, hand-painted ceilings, and serves up drinks from a poolside bar that’ll make you feel like you’ve escaped to Tangier.



a statue in front of a building: The celebrate with a poolside drink.


© Hotel Figueroa
The celebrate with a poolside drink.

If that isn’t enough to make you want to add a staycation or workation to your voting day, Hotel Figueroa offers both California resident discounts and work-from-hotel pricing.

Meena Thiruvengadam is a Travel + Leisure contributor who has visited 50 countries on six continents and 47 U.S. states. She loves historic plaques, wandering new streets, and walking on beaches. Find her on Twitter and Instagram.

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Is This Historic Santa Monica Hotel Haunted?

SANTA MONICA, CA — One of the earliest stays and great architectural designs in Santa Monica is also rumored to be one of the spookiest. The Georgian Hotel on Ocean Avenue opened in 1933 and was converted to apartments in the 1960s. In the 1990s it was converted back into a hotel—and some say some guests never left.

The gorgeous, bright blue and gold art deco gem is recognized as a historic landmark in the city. It was built at 1415 Ocean View Avenue in 1931 by architect M. Eugene Durfee, according to the Santa Monica Conservancy. The building was one of the tallest in Santa Monica for many years. Durfee was also known for the Art Deco Central Tower Building at 1424 Fourth Street, which was completed in 1929.

The Georgian Hotel was built in the Depression, which halted much of the city’s tourism and leisure industry at the time, but some wealthy clients still wanted to be near the ocean. Once it was completed and opened, the hotel attracted the rich and stylish, including some of the early Hollywood celebrities.

Stars like Carole Lombard and Clark Gable would sneak away to the coast to get away and stay there. People also loved the famed speakeasy, where it was private and guests could drink in comfort—before Prohibition was repealed.

According to Santa Monica Daily Press, “some current guests allege the spirits of former tenants still linger” with stories circling of staff getting phone calls from unoccupied rooms and hearing voices in the former speakeasy space.

“One of our overnight officers tells a story about getting a telephone call from a guest room that was not occupied and he just heard giggling,” Westermeier told SMPD. “A guest claims to have checked into their room, put their stuff down and jumped into the shower. When they came out the television was on, the bed was open and the suitcase was empty.”

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Enjoy Maine’s coastline from a historic grand hotel or aboard a sailboat

Enjoy Maine’s coastline from a historic grand hotel or aboard a sailboat

Always drawn to the water, Anthony Everett checks in at The Colony Hotel in Kennebunkport, conveniently located near town shops and art galleries.


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ANTHON MAJESTIC IN THE MORNING LIGHT. A GRANDE DAME LOOKING OVER THE ATLANTIC. WITNESS AND HOST TO MORE THAN A CENTURY OF HISTORY. ♪ ANTHON IT WAS 1873 WHEN THE OCEAN BLUFF HOTEL WAS FIRS BUILT ON THIS PROMONTORY WHERE THE KENNEBUNK RIVER SPILLS TO THE SEA A QUARTER-CENTURY LATER, IT BURNED TO THE GROUND. IN 1914, THE BREAKWATER COURT ROSE FROM HER ASHES. AND THIS ATTRACTIV YANKEE SOON DREW THE ATTENTION OF A SOUTHERN BELLE. THE ICONIC COLONY HOTEL OF DELRAY BEACH, FLORIDA. ABOUT 10 FAMILY, WHO OWNED THE COLONY, THOUGH THE BREAKWATER WOULD MAKE A PERFECT SUMME COMPANION TO THEIR WINTER RESORT. >> THEY NEED SOME — NEEDED SOMETHING TO O WITH THEIR STAFF IN T SUMMER. SO THEY PURCHASED A HOTEL HERE SO THEY COULD BRING THEIR STAFF NORTH AND SOUTH. ANTHONY: IN 1947, THE MARRIAGE WAS COMPLETE, AND THE BREAKWATER TOOK THE COLON NAME. THE TWO HOTELS HAVE REMAINED IN THE MOUNTAIN FAMILY EVER SINCE. THAD VISITED WITH JUSTINE ABOUT AN IN DEL RAY IN 2018 PARTNER JOHN MARTIN, WHO VALUES THE HISTORIC RELEVANCE O THIS 105-YEAR-OLD LANDMARK. >> WE ARE TRYING TO NOT PRESERVE HISTORY LIKE COLONIAL LOOMS NECESSARILY, BUT WE ARE TRYING TO STAY TRUE TO THE NATURE OF TH COLONY. . IT TAKES A LONG TIME TO GET YOUR ARMS WRAPPED AROUND THAT CONCEPT, AND THEN TRY TO STAY WITH IT. RENOVATED, MAKE IT BEAUTIFUL, BUT MAKE IT TRUE TO WHAT IT IS. ANTHON THAT MEANS SPENDING MORE THAN $1 MILLION EACH YEAR ON RENOVATIONS. >> WE TRY TO DO SOMETHING THAT IS KIND OF ATTRACTIVE TO THE FRONT OF HOUSE THAT PEOPLE WOULD NOTICE. CARPETING, FLOORING, DRAPES. DA OBVIOUSLY, THERE IS A BUNCH OF BORING THINGS LIKE FOUNDATIONS AND HEAT SYSTEMS AND OTHER THINGS THAT HAVE TO GO ON BEHIND THE SCENES. ANTHONY: AND O COURSE, IF YOU NEED A CHANGE OF SCENE, KENNEBUNK BOARD HAS PLENTY TO OFFER. SHOPPING, DINING, MORE SHOPPING, AND A VIBRANT ARTISTIC COMMUNITY. A GOOD DEAL OF THAT REPRESENTED AT MAINE ART HILL RIGHT DOWNTOWN. IF THE KINETIC SCULPTURES OF ARTISTS OUTSIDE DO NOT GRAB YOUR ATTENTION — >> A LOT OF PEOPLE HAVE NEVER SEEN ANYTHING LIKE IT. ANTHONY: THEN PERHAPS THE LIT — THE VIVID LANDSCAPE IS INSIDE WILL. >> I HOPE VISITORS MAIN ART HE’LL GET TO SEE THE MANY TALENTS THAT A LOT OF LOCAL ARTISTS HAVE FROM OIL PAINTINGS TO GLASSBLOWING. WE TRY TO SHOW A VARIETY OF MEDIUMS. ANTHONY: BETWEEN THE MAIN GALLERY EXHIBIT SPACE AT THE GRAND HOTEL, 70 MICRO GALLERIES AND REGULAR POP-UPS. THERE ARE DIVERSE AND EVER-CHANGING OFFERINGS. ABBY DAGGETT AND NATE BRETT ARE OUR GALLERY MANAGERS. >> WE REALLY WANT THEM TO SEE THE WORLD THROUGH THE EYES OF THE ARTISTS.

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Aimbridge Hospitality Expands Full-Service Portfolio with the Addition of the Renaissance Charleston Historic District Hotel

PLANO, Texas, Oct. 19, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Aimbridge Hospitality, the leading, global, third-party hotel management company, announces it has been selected to manage the Renaissance Charleston Historic District Hotel.

With specialized operating expertise across all verticals and a deep understanding of full-service properties, Aimbridge Hospitality leverages its scale to add resources, efficiencies, and proprietary tools along with operating acumen focused on nuance. “We are very pleased to be the designated management company for Renaissance Charleston Historic District Hotel,” said Mike Deitemeyer, Global President of Aimbridge Hospitality. “As we continue to expand our full-service portfolio, our specialized teams provide a focused approach in operating this hotel category, backed by our advantage of scale.”

Renaissance Charleston Historic District Hotel boasts 166 design-forward guest rooms and eclectic, inviting décor throughout common areas. Located between King Street and Meeting Street, the property is central to the best of Charleston’s attractions, yet nestled in on a quiet street, giving guests the best of both worlds. The AAA four-diamond boutique hotel’s amenities include more than 2,700 square feet of event space and an outdoor saltwater pool. Additionally, renowned Chef Vivian Howard has designed two new restaurants, Handy and Hot, currently open for grab-and-go breakfast and lunch opens, and Lenoir opening for dinner by the end of 2020.

Renaissance Charleston Historic District Hotel is located at 68 Wentworth Street, Charleston, South Carolina 29401. For more information or to book a stay, please click here or call 843-534-0300.

About Aimbridge Hospitality

Aimbridge Hospitality is the leading, global, third-party hotel management company operating branded full service, select service, luxury hotels, destination resorts, convention centers, and lifestyle hotels. Aimbridge merged with Interstate Hotels & Resorts in 2019, and now represents a premium portfolio of more than 1,400 branded and independent properties in 49 states and 20 countries. Aimbridge is based in Plano, Texas, and has additional corporate offices in Atlanta, Calgary, Fargo, Puerto Rico, San Clemente, Toronto, and Washington D.C. Aimbridge’s International Division, Interstate Hotels & Resorts, has supporting offices spread across Europe in Amsterdam, Birmingham, Glasgow, and Moscow.

For more information on Aimbridge Hospitality, please visit www.aimbridgehospitality.com and connect with Aimbridge on LinkedIn.

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A Look Inside One Of Newport’s Most Historic Properties

Hotel Viking is located in the heart of Newport, Rhode Island, and dates back to 1926. The five-story Georgian Colonial is on the National Registry of Historic Places and has been a member of the prestigious Historic Hotels of American for more than 90 years. The property recently underwent a $6.2 million restoration that included renovating and updating the guest rooms, spa, pool, and fitness area. 

Location and Rooms

The property’s ten premier Mansion Suites capture the essence of Newport’s mansions from the Chateau to the Marble House to Rosecliff, with unique sitting rooms and stunning Gilded Age decor, including Queen Anne furnishings, rich velvet, silk, satin, and tapestries. 

There are 208 rooms, including the suites and junior suites. Some rooms include claw-foot baths, fireplaces, and sitting rooms. You can request a room in the historic part of the property. With a nod to the nautical theme of Newport, the color blue is subtly incorporated in the design aesthetic, but is not an overwhelming presence. Instead the boutique property serves to create an understated historic glamour. As one of the first hotels in Newport, Hotel Viking sits atop Historic Hill on Bellevue Avenue and is walking distance to pretty much everything in town. The Newport Trolley also stops right on the corner by the hotel.

The property draws a wide demographic, including couples looking for a romantic getaway as well as families looking for a long weekend away. The property is removed enough from the waterfront to afford quiet relaxation yet close enough to be able to walk to the hustle and bustle of restaurants, shops, and other attractions. The location is ideal; it’s a ten-minute walk to the famed Cliff Walk and a short walk to Bowen’s Wharf. The hotel also has free use of on-site bicycles, which is an ideal way to get around Newport and really explore the area. 

Most travelers come from driving distance—New England as well as the New York, Connecticut, and New Jersey tristate area. Newport is three hours from New York City and 90 minutes from Boston. 

Culinary 

One Bellevue Restaurant is the fine-dining venue and focuses on fresh local produce and meats from the area. Be sure to start with the Georges Banks scallops with toasted pork belly. For mains, fan favorites include the pan-roasted salmon served with wild mushrooms and the Atlantic halibut with tarragon chimichurri sauce. Meat lovers can choose between the seared rib eye, the filet mignon in rosemary demi-glace, or the New York strip served in bourbon cream. The slow-roasted chicken with shallots, garlic, and thyme is also a popular choice. The grilled asparagus side is crisp and fresh and lightly sautéed in olive oil. Outdoor dining is open seasonally;

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NYS Parks, Recreation & Historic Preservation

Covid-19 Update. New York State Parks encourages all boaters to recreate locally, practice social distancing, and use common sense to protect themselves and others. Avoid crowded launch sites and
congregating at marinas – launch or depart the slip as quickly as possible. For guidance on visiting the outdoors during the Covid-19 outbreak, visit: https://parks.ny.gov/covid19/ .
New York’s waters remain cold throughout the spring. Life jacket wear is required through May 1 on pleasure boats less than 21 feet long and dressing in layers is recommended to avoid hypothermia. Boaters should be alert at
all times and follow the rules of the nautical road. Under Brianna’s law, all operators of motorized vessels must take a safe boating course and earn a safe boating certificate by 2025. Due to the COVID-19 public health crisis,
all in-classroom safe boating classes are postponed until further notice, but online course options remain available. For a list of approved online providers, please visit the Boating Education Page

New York Safe Boating

Welcome aboard! New York State offers an abundance of scenic waterways for boaters including the Atlantic Ocean, Long Island Sound, the Hudson and St. Lawrence Rivers, lakes in the Adirondacks, the Barge Canal, the Finger Lakes, Great Lakes, and hundreds of other streams, lakes and rivers to enjoy. Boaters can escape on a relaxing cruise, fish a favorite cove, or embark on a family adventure exploring new waters, all while experiencing first-hand New York’s incredible natural beauty.

The Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation provides the public with a safe and enjoyable environment for recreational boating. Our goal is to assist the boater in developing safe boating habits and maintaining a strong law enforcement presence on our waters.

Everyone can be a safer boater by following the four suggestions below

Watch our safe boating PSA’S on YouTubeLeaving New York State Parks

Top questions about boating

Trending Topics in Boating!

Brianna's Law

Brianna’s Law

Brianna’s Law requires all motorboat operators to complete a boating safety course. New age requirements begin January 1, 2020, with full compliance by January 1, 2025

Click here to view video of Governor Cuomo signing Brianna’s Law

Click here to learn more about the new law

Standup PaddleBoarding

Stand Up Paddleboards (SUPs)

Stand up paddleboarding is one of the fastest growing watersports. The SUP is reminiscent of a surf board and is propelled by a paddler standing up.

SUP is considered a vessel when it is used outside of the surf zone or swim area.

A life jacket is required for each person on board a paddle craft, which include canoes, kayaks and SUP’s, as well as a sound signaling device. A mouth whistle is acceptable and is easily attached to the life jacket. It is highly recommended that the life jacket is worn. The exception to wearing a life jacket is when paddling in the ocean surf zone as the life jacket may restrict the ability to swim under the waves. In addition to the required life jacket and whistle, a leash is a recommended piece of safety

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